Kiwi dentists picking up the pieces when 'dental tourism' goes wrong

New Zealand dentists are increasingly having to pick up the pieces for "dental tourists" whose dental work done overseas has gone wrong, research shows.

A University of Otago survey of 337 New Zealand dentists in 2016 showed 96 per cent had encountered dental tourists at least once or twice a year, usually because they required remedial treatment.  

The most important issue dentists identified from their patients receiving treatment abroad was a lack of follow-up maintenance and a lack of availability post-treatment.  

About half of the respondents identified lack of treatment planning and lack of treatment records to be issues. 

One dentist explained they saw a patient in pain who had a full mouth of crowns and bridges.

"I wasn't prepared to treat the patient as the quality of work was absolutely appalling. The dentition had been absolutely wrecked and I wanted nothing to do with it," the dentist said. 

Many dentists were concerned that patients are unaware of the poor quality of work often being carried out. 

"Patients are often over-treated and inappropriately treated with irreversible damage to their teeth and no apparent discussion or awareness of treatment options," another dentist said.

Thailand was the most commonly noted country of treatment, with nearly 90 per cent of dental patients having been treated there, followed by India and Indonesia.

The most common type of treatment sought abroad was crowns, while implants and bridges were other commonly observed treatments.

While about half of the dentists acknowledged dental tourism provides access to affordable dental treatment, only six per cent felt it enhances dental health outcomes for their patients and only 1.9 per cent would recommend it to their patients.  

New Zealand Dental Association CEO Dr David Crum says dental tourism exists and will appeal to a small sector of New Zealanders. 

"It comes with risks most often related to quick care supplied over a very short duration by a practitioner unknown to the patient," Dr Crum said.

Most often the dental care required is at the advanced, and more expensive, end of the spectrum, and often not discovered to be poorly implemented until months later after the patient has returned home, he said.

The Dental Association says patients are best served by establishing a long-term care relationship with a dentist who meets mandatory New Zealand standards in their own community.

Source: 1 NEWS



'What’s up Muzza' - is it weird to call your parents by their first name?

What do you call your parents - mum and dad, or Geoff and Pam?

The idea some people call their parents by their first name was a hot topic on Breakfast this morning, with Hayley Holt saying it was a bit weird calling her parents by their given names.

‘I’d feel a bit odd, ‘hey Robin, what’s up Muzza?’”

Many viewers said calling parents by their given names was disrespectful, with one viewer saying she had earned the title of mum.

Another said when children were older, it could be a discussion families could have together.

Newsreader Scotty Morrison said in Te Reo Māori there were “beautiful terms” for older members of the whanāu.

“As our people get older they get more and more respect because of the life they have had, the life experience, the knowledge that they’ve gained," he said. 

“It’s important in Māori culture to have that respect for the older generation.”

Some Breakfast viewers thought it was disrespectful not to be called mum or dad. Source: Breakfast


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Police on the hunt after man seriously hurt in Hamilton shooting

A man has sustained serious injuries after being shot in Hamilton last night

Police responded to Derby Street, Nawton at 10:25pm after receiving reports of a shooting.

An investigation is underway to establish exactly what has occurred and inquiries are being made to find the offenders, who left the scene in a car.

The man is in a stable condition in a high dependency unit at Waikato Hospital.  

A scene examination on Derby Street will continue this morning.

Police car generic.
Police car generic. Source: 1 NEWS

Police are keen to talk to anyone who was in the area last night and may have information of interest to the investigation.

The incident took place in Nawton at 10.25pm yesterday – the offender fled the scene by car. Source: Breakfast

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Record number of happy punters as two win Powerball, 40 win Lotto first division

There were a lot more ecstatic Kiwi punters than usual last night, with two lucky Powerball players winning $2.5 million each and a record 40 players winning Lotto First Division.

Never before in the Lotto's 31-year history have that many winners been announced in a single draw. The 38 first division winners (without Powerball) will take home $25,000 each.

The winning Powerball tickets were sold at a Countdown supermarket in Hastings and at New Brighton Lotto & Discounter in Christchurch.

It follows a winning $7.2 million Powerball draw just a week earlier, sold from a Pak'n Save in Silverdale. As of yet, however, no one has come forward to claim it.

Some winners might be slightly disappointed by their haul from last night’s draw, while two others claimed over $2.5 million. Source: Breakfast


Strong growth expected in GDP figures to be released this morning

All eyes are on the country's financial performance this morning with economists expecting strong growth.

The latest GDP figures are due for release, with ASB tipping they'll show strong quarterly growth.

Westpac have forecast the annual rate of growth to hold steady at 2.7 percent and both banks are picking a 0.9 per cent rise for the quarter.

Eyes are on the country’s financial performance this morning, with ASB tipping strong quarterly growth. Source: Breakfast