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Re:

Re:

Rethinking New Zealand’s news, Re: covers the important issues that matter to young New Zealanders.

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  • Watch First

    Brad's Story

    M Brad Smeele broke his neck wakeboarding four years ago and is a quadriplegic. Before his accident, he was a good-looking, popular, professional athlete living a carefree life. All that changed and he is now completely dependent on caregivers. He tries not to look back too much but is struggling to accept his new reality. He is determined to walk again but instead of just relying on his physical self, he is now working on his mind.

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      G A Pākehā criminal lawyer sits down with a Māori former-prisoner to talk about Aotearoa's justice system. Awatea Mita was jailed for a non-violent drug crime. She meets a criminal defence lawyer, Charlotte Shade in Te Whanganui-a-Tara. How can our justice system rehabilitate rather than only punish?

      G 28-year-old Tyla, from Ngāi Tahu, married the love of his life, Saba, who came to Aotearoa from Pakistan when she was seven. In March, Saba's uncle and cousin were shot and killed at their mosque, along with 49 others in the Christchurch terrorist attack. How does the long shadow of racism and white supremacy affect Māori and Muslim communities?

      G When he was four weeks old, Mana was placed into foster care. The first years of his life were marked with fear, violence and isolation as he was moved from home to home until he was lucky taken in by loving foster parents. Māori make up 59 percent of children in state care. How can rangatahi find their own sense of whānau when theirs is fractured?

      G Medicine student Aniket Chawla is welcomed to Motatau Marae in Northland. He meets Juan and Tahjai Brown, students of rongoā - traditional Māori healing. How does a collective te ao Māori view of health differ from an individualistic Western one, and what can this mean for our mental health system?

      G Gender diversity was an accepted part of Māori and Pasifika societies before colonisation. But British Christian values brought stigma and shame. Jamie Waititi and Falencie Filipo are members of queer arts collective FAFSWAG. What does it mean to decolonise your identity?

      G There are 110 statues or monuments in Wellington, but only 10 of those represent Māori narratives. Two strangers, Safari Hynes and Peter McKenzie, meet to discuss whose ancestors are represented around the city.

      G Ngā Hinepūkōrero are a group of champion slam poets fluent in te reo. They meet Takunda Muzondiwa, who moved to Aotearoa from Zimbabwe as a child, at the grand final of a slam poetry competition in Tāmaki Makaurau (Auckland). How does your mother tongue help you find your voice?

      G The last bullet of the Land Wars was shot in 1916 at Maungapohatu in Te Urewera, and the forest was later taken into government control. Atamira Tumarae-Nuku, a Maungapohatu local welcomes Tait Burge, an inner-city Wellington conservationist to Te Urewera. How do we protect our land when we are disconnected from it?