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From the Vault

From the Vault

We're teaming up with NZ On Screen, to polish up some local gems from the past. Relive some of the best moments in television history, from breaking news to pop culture, comedy, drama, sports and more.

New theme available the 1st of every month on TVNZ OnDemand

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  • Watch First

    Before They Were Famous: Russell Crowe
    • Wednesday 1 Nov 2017

    G These days Russell Crowe is known for his movie career, but back in 1985 he was busy trying to make a name for himself in the music business. In fact, he was trying to make a somewhat different name for himself than the one we now know him by. Back then, Russell went by Russ le Roq, and was the leader of Auckland band Roman Antix. Here he's seen promoting their debut video on teen music show Shazam!, looking fresh-faced, but already showing the drive and determination that would soon land him in Hollywood. Fast-forward 15 years and he would be leading Romans of a different kind, playing General Maximum Meridius in Gladiator.

    Watch Now
      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G World War II didn't end after victory in Europe - the fighting continued in the Pacific until Japan's surrender in August 1945. This clip shows historic footage of the Japanese surrendering aboard HMS Glory, and the accompanying celebrations, but also gives us a sobering reminder of the high cost New Zealand paid as the price of war. It ends with Prime Minister Peter Fraser's victory speech.

      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G Johnny Checketts is a suitably dashing name for one of New Zealand's greatest wartime pilots. The Kiwi pilot shot down 14 enemy aircraft during the war and was celebrated on this episode of This is Your Life. This excerpt shows dramatic footage of Checketts shooting down German planes from the cockpit of his own Spitfire.

      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G Aotearoa is no stranger to war: from the Land Wars, to WWI and WWII, to the conflicts in the late last century. Thousands of Kiwis have gone to war, and many of them have never returned. Our People, Our Century explores the experiences of both soldiers and the families who waited at home. This excerpt looks at the experience of one young man, keen to join the 28th Māori Battalion.

      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G This clip from a special edition of Weekly Review shows the return to New Zealand of heroic Kiwi soldiers; on the cruiser HMS Achilles after the sinking of the Graf Spee, as well as from the Battle for Crete. The threat of invading Japanese forces at home required the defence of the Home Guard with "all the men and all the weapons we had", including jam-tin bombs.

      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G History series, The Years Back, explores different aspects of Kiwi life from 1900 to 1960. This episode focuses on the impact of the World War II on Kiwi women, many of whom took up jobs left vacant by men who were serving overseas. Women also joined the war effort, with more than 8,000 enlisted across the services. This clip, although ripe with the sexist stereotypical narration of the time, shows women putting their 'dainty hands' to use and making munitions for the men to use at the frontline.

      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G Writer Maurice Gee's experiences growing up in Auckland during World War II are the basis for this home front drama from 1989. It explores the realities of living in a country that didn't see active fighting, but was affected, nonetheless. As seen in this clip, it also explores the presence of the American GIs who were stationed in New Zealand during the conflict, and the local prejudices that came with many Kiwis meeting black Americans for the first time.

      • Saturday 1 Aug

      G Seventy-five years ago, New Zealanders were celebrating victory in Japan, which officially marked the end of World War II. The six-year war was over for New Zealand at 11am on 15 August 1945, as Japan formally surrendered. Kiwis took to the streets to celebrate this momentous occasion. This excerpt from Weekly Review shows Wellingtonians and Aucklanders braving the winter weather to dance in the streets. Victory in Japan came three months after victory in Europe, and the feeling of relief in this clip is palpable.

      • Wednesday 1 Jul

      G In the 80s, Telethons were the closest New Zealanders got to 24-hour television. The whole nation would get excited at the prospect of being able to stay up all night and watch the telly, as local celebrities took pledges and international stars got into the spirit of letting loose and losing their inhibitions all for a good cause. The theme song alone is enough to bring on a tidal wave of nostalgia.

      • Wednesday 1 Jul

      G Thingee and his human counterpart Jason Gunn were much loved companions to a generation of Kiwi kids in the 1980s. While it's not exactly clear just what Thingee was, his madcap loony style endeared him to children across Aotearoa. This clip showcases some of the characteristic adlibbing of the show. Check out Jason Gunn's oversized sunglasses and 80s shirt.

      • Wednesday 1 Jul

      G Kaleidoscope was one TVNZ's flagship arts show during the 1970s and 1980s. In this episode, the show celebrates the 10-year anniversary of Split Enz. The clip looks at the influence that Noel Crombie had on the band, from his conceptual video directing right through to his costume design that helped make the band so memorable.

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