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From the Vault

From the Vault

We're teaming up with NZ On Screen, to polish up some local gems from the past. Relive some of the best moments in television history, from breaking news to pop culture, comedy, drama, sports and more.

New theme available the 1st of every month on TVNZ OnDemand

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  • Watch First

    Before They Were Famous: Russell Crowe
    • Wednesday 1 Nov 2017

    G These days Russell Crowe is known for his movie career, but back in 1985 he was busy trying to make a name for himself in the music business. In fact, he was trying to make a somewhat different name for himself than the one we now know him by. Back then, Russell went by Russ le Roq, and was the leader of Auckland band Roman Antix. Here he's seen promoting their debut video on teen music show Shazam!, looking fresh-faced, but already showing the drive and determination that would soon land him in Hollywood. Fast-forward 15 years and he would be leading Romans of a different kind, playing General Maximum Meridius in Gladiator.

    Watch Now
      • Sunday 1 Aug

      G The iconic music! The prizes! Selwyn Toogood! Has there ever been a better game show in New Zealand? This clip sees Dunedin man Paul Bennett put through his paces by Selwyn Toogood, who even makes him recite a nursery rhyme. Toogood's catchphrases, such as, "by hokey!" and, "what'll it be customers, the money or the bag?", have become part of the Kiwi vernacular. But what'll it be for Paul Bennett - the money or the bag? You'll have to watch and find out.

      • Sunday 1 Aug

      G If you're old enough to remember the 70s, then you'll remember the catchphrase of A Week of It - Jeez Wayne. A Week of It both entertained and outraged audiences in equal measure. The comedy series was ground-breaking for local television in that it took aim at current issues and dealt heavily in satire. In this clip, Robin Harrison introduces the search for the 'ordinary bloke' and found three of them in the pub yarning over the issues of day. Be warned, the yarning might be a bit 'offside' for these gentler times.

      • Sunday 1 Aug

      G The Grunt Machine began life in 1975 as a pop culture show for adolescents and teenagers with a particular focus on music and reporter-based stories. It had a reincarnation of sorts in 1976 when it dropped the 'The' and introduced a new presenter by the name of Paul Holmes. This excerpt features a staple of 70s local television - the airport interview with the visiting celebrity. But wait! There's a catch - Rock star Hiram W Violent looks suspiciously like comedian and prankster John Clarke. You might also recognise the interviewer as Andy Anderson who later found fame in the Australian series The Sullivans.

      • Sunday 1 Aug

      G The pioneering Kiwi soap opera, Close to Home, made household names of some of our biggest actors. The soap, which screened on TV One, followed the trials and tribulations of the Hearte family and enjoyed enormous popularity during its eight-year run. The final episode was the 818th episode of the series and, in this excerpt, there are a lot of drinks spilled, cigarettes stubbed out - and some fine appearances by a young Mark Hadlow and a younger John Bach.

      • Sunday 1 Aug

      G In this infamous edition of current affairs show Gallery, interviewer Brian Edwards turns mediator in a long-running industrial dispute. After wage negotiations for Post Office workers broke down, staff were on an imposed 'go-slow' - which meant that all of New Zealand was invested in the outcome. With no real end in sight, Gallery Producer Des Monaghan managed to get the Postmaster General Mr McCready and Mr Reddish of the Post Office union into the studio together. Brian Edwards then managed to force an agreement between the two men in the final minutes of the show which finally put an end to the stalemate. In this excerpt Edwards discusses the dispute with workers on the shop floor.

      • Tuesday 1 Jun

      G The Kiwi version of Sale of the Century is perhaps best remembered for Steve Parr's opening slide to the podium, and for launching the TV career of Jude Dobson. "New Zealand's biggest bargain sale" dangled the possibility of new cars, overseas travel, or, in the case of this 1993 clip, a hand-knotted rug. This episode marked the end of show's first local incarnation, after 1000-plus episodes on air.

      • Tuesday 1 Jun

      G On Mastermind, contestants faced two minute rounds on general knowledge and an array of mind-boggling specialist subjects, all in a quest to claim the show's coveted chair. Hosted by Peter Sinclair, this clip from the 1990 final sees quiz show maestro Hamish McDouall (now Whanganui mayor) in the hot seat - his specialist topic? The life and works of David Bowie.

      • Tuesday 1 Jun

      G The New Zealand edition of US gameshow Wheel of Fortune ran between 1990 and 1996, and was briefly revived again in 2008. In that time, hosts included Phillip Leishman, Simon Barnett and, later, Jason Gunn. This clip, taken from a 1992 celebrity episode, features perhaps our most infamous TV blooper - the moment David Tua requested the letter O, "for Awesome".

      • Tuesday 1 Jun

      G Younger sibling to It's Academic, The W Three Show was a quiz show for intermediate school students that took its name from the first letter of the questions asked: What, Which, Who, Where or When. Also hosted by Lockwood Smith, this footage from the 1980 national final features some awkward pauses, as young minds grapple with (amongst other things) the distance between earth and the sun, and the location of the Sea of Tranquility.

      • Tuesday 1 Jun

      G Hosted by future politician Lockwood Smith, It's Academic was a 1980s general knowledge quiz show for high school students. In this clip, teams from Onslow, Wellington and Newlands colleges compete in a 1983 regional final, answering Smith's frenzied questions on everything from British naval history to how to spell 'winceyette'.

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