Watch: Wild celebrations on streets of Harare as Mugabe resigns as Zimbabwe president

The streets of Zimbabwe's capital today erupted in dancing, singing, honking and cheers after President Robert Mugabe announced his immediate resignation following 37 years in power overnight.

Parliament's speaker read out a letter from Mr Mugabe, 93, confirming the news today.

Emmerson Mnangagwa, elected as the new leader of Zimbabwe's ruling political party and now poised to take over as the country's president within hours.

Read more: Robert Mugabe stands down as president of Zimbabwe 'with immediate effect' after 37 years in charge

Read more: Meet the man set to replace Mugabe as Zimbabwe's president


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US space agency head sure cause of mysterious hole on the International Space Station will be found

The head of the US space agency says he is sure that the cause will be determined of a mysterious hole that appeared on the International Space Station, which his Russian counterpart has said was deliberately drilled.

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine also said today that collaboration with Russia's Roscosmos remains important, despite recent comments by agency head Dmitry Rogozin that Russia wouldn't accept a "second-tier role" in a NASA-led plan to build an outpost near the moon.

The hole that appeared in a Russian Soyuz capsule docked to the ISS caused a brief loss of air pressure in August before being patched.

Bridenstine met with Rogozin in Moscow today and both are to attend the launch of a manned capsule to the space station tomorrow.

IN SPACE  - JUNE 16: (EDITORIAL USE ONLY) (NO SALES) This handout image supplied by the European Space Agency (ESA), shows the Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft attached to the International Space Station, on June 16, 2016. The Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft flew ESA astronaut Tim Peake, commander Yuri Malenchenko and NASA's Tim Kopra out to the ISS for their six month mission on December 15, 2015. The astronauts are scheduled to return to earth June 18 in their Soyuz TMA-19M spacecraft and land near Zhezkazgan, Kazakhstan.  (Photo by  Tim Peake/ESA/NASA via Getty Images)
The hole that appeared in a Russian Soyuz capsule docked to the ISS caused a brief loss of air pressure in August before it was patched up. (file) Source: Getty


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Zookeeper killed by white tiger in Japan

Police in southern Japan said today that they are investigating the death of a zookeeper in an apparent attack by a white tiger.

Police said Akira Furusho was found bleeding from his neck and lying on the floor yesterday inside a tiger cage at Hirakawa Zoological Park in Kagoshima.

Zoo officials said they believe Furusho was attacked while trying to move a male tiger from its exhibition cage to its night-time cage.

The 170-kilogram animal is one of four rare white tigers at the city-operated zoo.

Furusho was rushed to a hospital but was later pronounced dead. His autopsy results are pending.

Police said they are investigating whether proper safety measures were in place at the zoo.

No one saw the moment of the apparent attack. The tiger was sedated with a tranquiliser gun.

Zoo director Akinori Ishido told a televised news conference that he was saddened by the loss of his staff. He said safety procedures at the zoo are designed in a way that keepers do not enter a cage for feeding or cleaning while animals are inside.

The keeper somehow had entered the same space with the animal, Ishido said.

Furusho's family has asked that the zoo keep the tiger alive, according to NHK public television.

The white tiger area was closed to the public while police investigate.

In this undated photo, White tiger Riku sits in a cage at Hirakawa Zoological Park in Kagoshima, southern Japan. Japanese police are investigating the death of a zoo keeper apparently after being mauled by the white tiger at the animal park. Local police said the 40-year-old Akira Furusho was found bleeding from his neck and collapsed Monday, Oct. 8, 2018, evening inside a tiger cage at the zoo.  Zoo officials said they believe Furusho was attacked while trying to move the male tiger from its exhibition cage to its night-time cage. (Hirakawa Zoological Park/Kyodo News via AP)
A white tiger sits in a cage at Hirakawa Zoological Park in Kagoshima. Source: Associated Press

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US Ambassador to the UN Nikki Haley resigns, says 'I'm not running' for president in 2020

UN Ambassador Nikki Haley is leaving the administration at the end of the year, she and President Donald Trump announced overnight.

She gave no reason for her departure after two years, though there is speculation she will return to government or politics at some point.

"No, I'm not running in 2020" for president, she joked. She said she would be supporting Trump.

Haley said she and Trump together had "solved a lot of problems. They spoke in the Oval Office, shortly after word came of her plans to resign.

Trump called Haley a "very special" person, adding that she told him six months ago that she might want to take some time off.

It's the latest shake-up in the turbulent Trump administration just weeks before the November midterm elections. Haley's resignation was a closely guarded secret. Congressional Republicans involved in foreign policy matters and some key U.S. allies did not get advance word from Haley or the White House.

Haley, who is speculated to hold aspirations for higher office, said at the White House: "No I'm not running in 2020."

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Haley, 46, was appointed to the U.N. post in November 2016 and last month coordinated Trump's second trip to the United Nations, including his first time chairing the Security Council.

A rookie to international politics, the former South Carolina governor was an unusual pick for to be U.N. envoy.

"It was a blessing to go into the U.N. every day with body armor," Haley said, saying her job was to defend America on the world stage.

At the U.N., Haley helped spearhead the Trump administration's efforts to combat what it alleged to be anti-American and anti-Israel actions by the international body.

Trump said he was considering many candidates for Haley's job and that a successor would be named in two to three weeks.

Last month Haley wrote an op-ed article in The Washington Post discussing her policy disagreements but also her pride in working for Trump. It came in response to an anonymous essay in The New York Times by a senior administration official that alleged there to be a secret "resistance" effort from the right in Trump's administration and that there were internal discussions of invoking the 25th amendment to remove him from office.

"I proudly serve in this administration, and I enthusiastically support most of its decisions and the direction it is taking the country," Haley wrote. "But I don't agree with the president on everything."

The daughter of Indian immigrants, Haley clashed with then-candidate Trump during the 2016 campaign, denouncing "the siren call of the angriest voices" who disrespected America's immigrants. Trump tweeted that "The people of South Carolina are embarrassed by Nikki Haley."

"Before she was named by Trump to her U.N. post, Haley was elected the first female governor of South Carolina. She was re-elected in 2014.

South Carolina Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, a close Trump ally tweeted that Haley "has a very bright future and will be a key player in both the future of the Republican Party and our nation as a whole for years to come."

As governor, she developed a national reputation as a racial conciliator who led the charge to bring down the Confederate flag at the Statehouse and helped guide the state through one of its darkest moments, the massacre at a black church.

She’ll leave the role at the end of the year and there’s speculation she’ll run for the US presidency. Source: BBC


Brett Kavanaugh takes the bench for his first day as Supreme Court Justice

Brett Kavanaugh took the bench with his new Supreme Court colleagues for the first time Tuesday in a jovial atmosphere that was strikingly at odds with the tension and rancor surrounding his high court confirmation.

The new justice dived into his new job, asking a handful of questions in the first arguments of the day following a traditional welcome from Chief Justice John Roberts, who wishing Kavanaugh "a long and happy career in our common calling."

Kavanaugh took his seat at the end of bench to Roberts' far left just after 10 a.m., a visible manifestation of a moment that Republicans have dreamed of for decades, with five solidly conservative justices on the court, and Democrats have dreaded.

His path to confirmation was turbulent - opposition to him intensified after Christine Blasey Ford accused him of sexually assaulting her, allegations Kavanaugh denied.

In court, Kavanaugh asked questions of both sides in arguments over increased prison sentences for repeat offenders. He jumped in with his first question after most of the other justices had spoken.

Questions from Kavanaugh and Justice Neil Gorsuch, President Donald Trump's two high court picks, suggested they could vote against the Trump administration and side with a criminal defendant from Florida who is fighting an increase in his sentence from just over six years to possibly more than 15 years.

There were no disruptions in the courtroom and the justices laughed at each other's jokes. Justice Sonia Sotomayor even appeared to playfully pinch Gorsuch's arm as she asked a question about the kind of physical force necessary to have a crime be treated as violent under a federal enhanced sentencing law.

The newest justice's wife and two daughters were in seats reserved for justices' guests, along with retired Justice Anthony Kennedy. Kavanaugh replaced Kennedy on the bench.

The 53-year-old Kavanaugh occasionally chatted privately with his seatmate, Justice Elena Kagan. From time to time, he put on reading glasses to refer to papers in front of him.

There was a long line of people hoping to see Kavanaugh's first appearance. Police put up barricades in front of the court, but there were few protesters in the early morning.

Those who were there held signs saying, "We will not forget" and "We do not consent," following the acrimonious fight that culminated in Kavanaugh's 50-48 Senate confirmation Saturday.

Kennedy's presence in the courtroom underscored the changing of the guard on the bench. Kennedy was a more moderate conservative who sometimes sided with the court's four liberal justices. Kavanaugh, in contrast, is expected to be a more decidedly conservative vote, tilting the court right for decades and leaving Roberts as the justice closest to the ideological middle.

Republicans had hoped to confirm Kavanaugh in time for him to join the court on October 1, the start of the new term. Instead, the former D.C. Circuit judge missed the first week of arguments as the Senate considered an allegation that he had sexually assaulted a woman in high school, an allegation he adamantly denied.

US Supreme Court Jusitce Brett Kavanaugh.
US Supreme Court Jusitce Brett Kavanaugh. Source: Associated Press