Watch: US TV anchor calls out viewer who emailed vulgar racist slur

A US news anchor has taken the time to confront a viewer live on air who sent in a racially abusive email that included an ugly slur . 

While discussing how shifting racial demographics of Atlanta played a part in the recent Georgia city mayoral election, news anchor Sharon Reed stopped the live programme to discuss the email that had been sent in from viewer Kathy Rae. 

Before the email was shown on screen, Ms Reed said, "a woman by the name of Kathy Rae emailed me. We're going to put that email on the screen and then I'll comment after it.

"I think it's fair for people to see what she wrote.

The email read, "you need to be fired for the race baiting comment you made tonight. It’s o.k. for blacks to discuss certain subjects but not whites. Really??? you are what I call a N****not a black person. you are a racist N****. you are what’s wrong with the world.

"You are a racist N*****. You what's wrong with the world."

Responding to the email, staring directly down the camera, Ms Reed said "quite the contrary, we think that race is an authentic discussion to have."

"It's one we’re having tonight because it's one that you are talking about at home and it's one that has clearly entered the Atlanta mayor's race. That's why, behind the scenes, my colleagues and I — white and black — we decided, hey let's go for it."

"When arguing with somebody you have to be careful not to mischaracterise their viewpoint, so I won't mischaracterise your view either, Kathy Rae. I get it.

"On December 5, 2017, you think it's okay to call this journalist a 'n*****.' I don't. But I could clap back and say a few things to you. But instead I'll let your words, Kathy Rae, speak for themselves. And that will be the last word."

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Pope Francis defrocks pair of Chilean bishops accused of sexually abusing minors

Pope Francis on Saturday defrocked two more Chilean bishops accused of sexually abusing minors, and to show greater transparency about how he's responding to the church's global sex abuse crisis, he publicly explained why they were removed.

The Vatican's unusually detailed statement announcing the laicization of retired Archbishop Francisco Jose Cox Huneeus and retired Bishop Marco Antonio Ordenes Fernandez signaled a new degree of transparency following past missteps by Francis that showed he had grossly underestimated the gravity of the abuse scandal.

The statement said the two were defrocked for abusing minors with evidence so overwhelming that a canonical trial was unnecessary. The Vatican said the decision cannot be appealed.

Cox, 87 and suffering from dementia, is a member of the Schoenstatt religious order and had served as a bishop in Chillan, Chile before becoming the No. 2 official at the Vatican's Pontifical Council for the Family, a high-profile position during St. John Paul II's papacy.

He returned to Chile and became bishop in La Serena until he left in 1997 under unclear circumstances, but took on administrative jobs in Rome and at the Latin American bishops' conference in Colombia.

In 2002, the Vatican office for bishops asked the Schoenstatt Fathers to take him in one of its houses, apparently because of abuse allegations. He has been living in Germany since then but last year a new, formal accusation was received by the Vatican about an alleged case of abuse that happened in Germany in 2004.

The Schoenstatt Fathers said Saturday the Vatican had asked that Cox remain in their custody. The order said it would cooperate with the justice system, given that victims in Chile have made criminal complaints against him.

"We receive this news with much shame for the damage caused to the victims," the community said. "We show solidarity with them and their profound suffering. Today more than ever, we deplore every act of abuse that offends the dignity of people."

Given the favor that Cox enjoyed by John Paul's inner circle, his fall is yet another stain on John Paul's legacy. It also calls into question the senior Schoenstatt cardinal in Chile, Cardinal Javier Errazuriz, an adviser to Francis who has long been accused of covering up for abusers.

Ordenes Fernandez, 53, for his part, was made bishop of Iquique, in northern Chile, in 2006 at the young age of 42. He retired six years later allegedly for health reasons. But subsequently allegations of abuse were leveled against him.

Previously, the Vatican has rarely, if ever, announced laicizations of individual priests and only issued a single-line statement if a bishop had resigned, without further explanation.

Before Francis' papacy began in 2013, it was Vatican practice to reveal if resignations were retirements due to age, or for some other 'grave' reason that made them unfit for office. But Francis early on removed even that minimum amount of information.

Advocates for abuse survivors have long complained about the Vatican's secrecy in handling such abuse cases, and the lack of transparency when it arrived at judgments.

Vatican spokesman Greg Burke said Saturday's more detailed statement suggested a new trend in the way the Vatican will announce the results of investigations of bishops accused of abuse. A similarly detailed statement was issued when Francis defrocked Chile's most notorious abuser, the Rev. Fernando Karadima, several weeks ago.

Francis has been under fire for his handling of abuse cases for years, but the issue now is threatening his credibility and his legacy. The church's abuse scandal has exploded anew in the U.S., Chile, Germany and elsewhere, and decisions made early in Francis' papacy made it appear that he did not grasp the gravity of the trauma done to abuse victims.

In May, all active bishops in Chile offered to resign over their collective mishandling of the abuse scandal. So far, Francis has accepted the resignations of seven.

Francis discussed the issue during his Vatican audience Saturday with Chilean President Sebastian Pinera Echenique, who also met with the Vatican secretary of state, Cardinal Pietro Parolin.

The Vatican said both meetings discussed "the painful scourge of abuse of minors, reiterating the effort of all in collaboration to combat and prevent the perpetration of such crimes and their concealment."

Chilean survivors of abuse applauded the defrockings, saying the two bishops had used their power to abuse children and gotten away with it.

A group of lay Catholics from Cox's old diocese in La Serena said they hoped he would be extradited to face justice in Chile, saying he had abused children as young as five.

"We want to let it be known that the Schoenstatt order has in its hands a criminal, a predator," who should be "judged and punished like any other delinquent," said Juan Rojas, a spokesman for the John XXIII lay group of La Serena.

Chilean abuse victim Juan Carlos Cruz, who has long denounced the abuse cover-up orchestrated by the highest echelons of the Chilean church, said the "circle was getting tighter" around Errazuriz, the retired archbishop of Santiago who is a member of Cox's order.

Francis is under pressure to distance himself from Errazuriz, who remains a member of his kitchen cabinet of nine cardinal advisers.

A report from the US found at least 1000 children were abused by 300 Priests over the past 70 years. Source: Breakfast


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Worrying rise in Ebola cases after efforts to contain Congo outbreak become violent

A runaway hearse carrying an Ebola victim has become the latest example of sometimes violent community resistance complicating efforts to contain a Congo outbreak - and causing a worrying new rise in cases.

The deadly virus' appearance for the first time in the far northeast has sparked fear. Suspected contacts of infected people have tried to slip away. Residents have assaulted health teams. The rate of new Ebola cases has more than doubled since the start of this month, experts say.

Safe burials are particularly sensitive as some outraged family members reject the intervention of health workers in the deeply personal moment, even as they put their own lives at risk.

On Wednesday (local time), a wary peace was negotiated over the body of an Ebola victim, one of 95 deaths among 172 confirmed cases so far, Congo's health ministry said. Her family demanded that an acquaintance drive the hearse, while they agreed to wear protective gear to carry the casket. A police vehicle would follow.

On the way to the cemetery, however, the hearse peeled away "at full speed," the ministry said. A violent confrontation followed with local youth once the hearse was found at the family's own burial plot elsewhere. The procession eventually reached the cemetery by day's end.

The next day, with a better understanding of what was at stake, several family members appeared voluntarily at a hospital for Ebola vaccinations, the ministry said.

"They swore no one had manipulated the corpse," it added. Ebola spreads via bodily fluids of those infected, including the dead.
The Beni community where the confrontation occurred is at the center of Ebola containment efforts. To the alarm of the World Health Organisation and others, it is also where community resistance has been the most persistent - and where many of the new cases are found.

Chronic mistrust after years of rebel attacks is part of the "toxic mix" in Beni, WHO's emergencies chief, Peter Salama, said in a Twitter post.

So far, the Ebola work in Beni has been suspended twice since the outbreak was declared on Aug. 1. A "dead city" of mourning in response to a rebel attack caused the first. Wednesday's violence caused the second. With each pause, crucial efforts to track thousands of possible Ebola contacts can slide, risking further infections.

Defending themselves, Beni residents have pointed out the shock of having one of the world's most notorious diseases appear along with strangers in biohazard suits who tell them how to say goodbye to loved ones killed by the virus.

"Until now we didn't know enough about Ebola and we felt marginalised when Red Cross agents came in and took the corpse and buried it without family members playing a role," Beni resident Patrick Kyana, who said a friend lost his father to the virus, told The Associated Press. "It's very difficult. Imagine that your son dies and someone refuses to let you assist in his burial. In Africa we respect death greatly."

Until recently many people in Beni didn't believe that Ebola existed, thinking it was a government plot to further delay presidential elections, Kizito Hangi, president of Beni's civil society, told the AP.

Now the population has started to catch on and cooperate, Hangi said. "The problem was that the health workers all came from outside, but local specialists have been included to persuade and inform people in local languages."

The head of emergency Ebola operations with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, Jamie LeSueur, acknowledged the problem.

In early October two Red Cross volunteers were severely injured in an attack during safe burials in the community of Butemo. Another volunteer was injured in September by people throwing stones.

"It raised a lot of questions for all of us. Where is the violence coming from?" he said. They have stepped up efforts to collaborate with communities and be clearer about messaging while working within cultural norms as best as possible.

"Of course there are limitations," LeSueur said. "Some people like to view the corpse as it is buried but with Ebola it is difficult to open up the body bag."

In the emotionally charged environment where families have lost loved ones, a misstep could quickly raise tensions.

While Congo's government is acting to give more protection to its own safe burial teams in Beni, LeSueur noted that the "militarisation" of similar efforts in the far deadlier Ebola outbreak in West Africa a few years ago led some residents to hide or not report deaths from the virus.

"I don't think that will be the case in this event" but everyone remembers that lesson, he said.

With its position of neutrality the Red Cross doesn't use armed guards in any case, LeSueur added. "Community acceptance, that's our security."

Source: Associated Press


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Wild weather in Antarctica delays annual journey

Antarctica is facing a series of storms that have caused the longest delay for the start of the season in decades.

Antarctica New Zealand staff were due to fly south on 1 October to set up Scott Base for the science season ahead, but wild winds and snow have closed the McMurdo Sound airfields.

Antarctica New Zealand general manager of operations Simon Trotter said the team was working hard to minimise impact on work planned for the season.

"There are only 22 weeks in the season, so a two-week delay, especially at the beginning, is significant.

"Although weather delays are beyond our control, we deal with them every year. All we can do is re-schedule and wait for the window of opportunity."

"The storms have also affected our US neighbours who are due to fly south to McMurdo Station," Mr Trotter said.

"Unlike us, they can't send their employees home to wait it out - so many of them are getting to know Christchurch very well."

Meanwhile, the US participants in Christchurch are getting required training they would otherwise get in Antarctica to maximize their productivity once they reach McMurdo.

A US Air Force C17 Globemaster is patiently waiting on the tarmac at Christchurch Airport for the Antarctic storms to subside. As soon as the weather clears, the plane, along with an Airbus, will fly participants to the ice.

Weather permitting, flights will start tomorrow. The plan is to start clearing the backlog with seven flights over the next week if weather clears.

rnz.co.nz

The icy Antarctic sea. Source: 1 NEWS


Singer Michael Buble says son's cancer diagnosis made him no longer 'have the stomach' for public life

Michael Buble has suggested in an interview that he is retiring from the music scene after one final album. Though it's unclear if he was serious, and his publicist has now claimed the comment was taken out of context.

His announcement follows his son's diagnosis with liver cancer that has left him believing that he no longer 'has the stomach' to maintain a public life. He has also announced that he will no longer be using social media.

In an emotional interview with the Daily Mail, Buble said that he will no longer give interviews or release music (apart from his final album) and will concentrate on his family.

The Daily Mail story, however, suggests at the end he may not have been totally serious about calling time on his career, and his publicist has since said the story "took his comments out of context".

His son Noah’s cancer is now in remission, but Buble nonetheless feels as if he is done with the anxiety and pressure of being famous.

Speaking about the tragedy of his son’s diagnosis, he said: “My whole being has changed. My perception of life. I don’t know if I can get through this conversation without crying and I’ve never lost control of my emotions in public.

“I never fell out of love for music, I just need to put it aside.”

The Canadian-Italian singer also spoke about his last album and the reason behind it.

"There are three reasons I wanted to do this album," he said.

"One, because I felt a debt of gratitude, deeper than I can explain, to the millions of people all over the world who prayed for us and showed us compassion. That gave me faith in humanity.

"Two, because I love music and feel I can continue the legacy of my idols. And three, because if the world was ending – not just my own personal hell but watching the political turmoil in America and watching Europe break up – there’s never a better time for music."

Then suddenly he stopped in the interview.

"This is my last interview," he said. "I’m retiring from the business. I’ve made the perfect record and now I can leave at the very top."

The Daily Mail writer then says: "Somehow, though, I don’t think he really means it."

His record Love, will be released on November 16.

Michael Buble


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