Watch: The moment Prince Harry and Meghan Markle exchange rings, say 'I do'

You could hear a pin drop as Prince Harry and Meghan Markle exchanged vows in Windsor Castle's St George's Chapel, moments before being married by the Archbishop of Canterbury, early today.

After their vows, the pair put rings - made by Cleave & Company - on each other.

The American actress' ring was made with Welsh gold given by Queen Elizabeth II.

Prince Harry's ring was a platinum band with a textured finish.

Prince William carried the rings into St George's Chapel today.

These were the vows that they spoke to each other. 

While holding hands, Prince Harry began: 

"I Harry, take you, Meghan, to be my wife, to have and to hold from, this day forward; for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part; according to God's holy law. In the presence of God I make this vow."

Meghan then replied: "I Meghan, take you, Meghan, to be my husband, to have and to hold, from this day forward; for better, for worse, for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health, to love and to cherish, till death us do part; according to God's holy law. In the presence of God I make this vow."

Pair given official titles by the Queen

Prince Harry will be known as the Duke of Sussex while Markle is to become Duchess of Sussex, after Queen Elizabeth hearlier conferred royal titles on the pair.



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Radio station already playing Christmas songs, but it's to ease dying toddler's pain

A radio station in the US is already playing Christmas music.

But it's not a shameless bid to further commoditise the holiday that some listeners have mistakenly assumed. The station has agreed to play the music months ahead of schedule to help dying toddler Brody Allen.

The two-year-old, who has a rare form of brain cancer, has asked to celebrate the holiday early in case he doesn't make it that long.

Cincinnati, Ohio, radio station WARM 98 has promised to add a little Christmas cheer to its broadcast at least once an hour.

"You should see the Facebook comments that we're getting," radio host Jim Day told news outlet WKRC. "As soon as we explain it, they're like, 'Oh, that's a really good reason', and they're fine with it."

The station has also organised another "Christmas miracle" for tomorrow in which staff and listeners will sing carols in the child's neighbourhood, which is already adorned with decorations. A Christmas parade will take place on Monday.

"Just all over the world he's touched people," said radio station co-host Amanda Orlando, explaining that little Brody has received Christmas cards from as far away as Australia, Lebanon and Japan.

It was a sentiment echoed by Brody's father, who choked back tears earlier this week as he spoke about the community and worldwide effort with a reporter for local station Fox19.

"To have so many people across the world reach out to my son and to tell him, 'Merry Christmas, we're thinking about you and we love you', is just the greatest gift that I as a father could ever give him," Todd Allen said.

Cards can be sent to the family at 9696 Adair Court, Cincinnati, Ohio 45251, USA.

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Man's fingers severed in samurai sword attack in Brisbane

A man has had four fingers and part of his thumb severed by a samurai sword during a fight at a caravan park north of Brisbane.

The 45-year-old suffered the injury after allegedly being attacked by a 40-year-old during a dispute at the caravan park in Aspley on Wednesday night.

The man underwent emergency surgery at a Brisbane hospital, while the alleged attacker will face Pine Rivers Magistrates Court on Thursday after being charged with grievous bodily harm.

Samurai sword. Source: istock.com

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'Should be a blank gap in between letters if it was a real mistake' - Engineer casts doubt over plane typo

Cathay Pacific are not shying away from a huge mistake – a typo to be exact.

The airline had a Boeing 777-367 on the ground at Hong Kong airport emblazoned with “Cathay Paciic” after leaving the f out of its name.

The airline referenced the error on its Twitter account but an engineer for sister company, Haeco, cast doubt over the typo.

“The spacing is too on-point for a mishap. We have stencils. Should be a blank gap in between letters if it was a real mistake I think,” the engineer told the South China Morning Post.

The Boeing 777 was snapped in Hong Kong this week with the major error for all to see. Source: Breakfast


Aussie grandfather cheats death after giant metal rod smashes through windscreen

An Australian grandfather cheated death when a giant metal rod fell from a construction truck and plunged into his windscreen.

Joe Sant was driving when a truck, which was travelling in the opposite direction in Sydney’s Peakhurst, lost its load.

The rod smashed his windscreen, but thankfully narrowly missed him.

‘I just go a bit of glass in my eye, that’s all,” he told Nine News.

He went to hospital as a precaution.

Sydney’s Joe Sant was surprised when the metal rod fell froma construction truck and flew through his windscreen. Source: Breakfast


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