Watch: Man narrowly escapes death as bank he's walking along collapses into raging Argentina floodwaters

A man had a narrow escape from death when part of a river bank he was walking along in Argentina collapsed into raging floodwaters below only a second after he walked over the spot.

Video of the incident shows a group of people walking along the banks of the River Pilcomayo in northern Argentina as the water reportedly rose to seven metres.

One man walks past the spot that's about to slip, but onlookers, apparently seeing what was about to happen, start shouting as another man steps over.  The ground disappears just a second later.

The video carried by Australia's Nine News is taken from a cliff above the river bank.

Heavy rain for days has affected more than 60,000 people in the region, Argentinian authorities have said.

Severe flooding has hit several parts of South America, including Bolivia where it has reportedly killed at least six people and left at least 50,000 homeless.



Fully compostable takeaway coffee cup created by UK company

A company in the UK has come up with a solution to the serious damage caused by plastic - a fully compostable takeaway coffee cup.

BBC reports that Biome Bioplastics has made a cup using natural materials including potato starch, and cellulose - which makes up plant cell walls. 

The cup is fully biodegradable and also completely disposable meaning it can be recycled or discarded as food waste. They are not yet on the market.

At present only nine per cent of what we think we are recycling is actually being recycled, coffee cups being a large part of this.

According to BBC's report, consumers believe coffee cups are already recyclable but the lids tend to be made from a plastic, which makes the cup water proof an therefore not be recyclable.

Science Magazine reports that currently over five trillion pieces of plastic are floating in our oceans and some which will take up to 1000 years to degrade fully. 



Coffee cup (file picture).
Coffee cup (file picture). Source: istock.com

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Controversial 'Tiger Temple' to reopen as zoo in Thailand

Warning: This article contains content that some readers may find distressing. 

KANCHANABURI, THAILAND - JUNE 1:  (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains graphic content.)  Thai DNP officers collect samples for DNA testing from the carcasses of 40 tiger cubs found undeclared at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple on June 1, 2016 in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. Wildlife authorities in Thailand raided a Buddhist temple in Kanchanaburi province where 137 tigers were kept, following accusations the monks were illegally breeding and trafficking endangered animals. Forty of the 137 tigers were rescued by Tuesday from the country's infamous 'Tiger Temple' despite opposition from the temple authorities. (Photo by Dario Pignatelli/Getty Images)
There are accusations the monks were illegally breeding and trafficking endangered animals. Source: Getty

Thailand's controversial 'Tiger Temple' is set to reopen this month as a zoo, importing 24 new tigers after it was shut down two years ago. 

Tiger
A tiger (File picture). Source: istock.com

Adisorn Noochdamrong of the Department of National Parks, Wildlife and Plant Conservation told Thai news publication Khaosod: "They're registered as a zoo now, not just having animals in the temple like before. It will be legal, because our department can control it by law directly."

Despite being shut down in 2016, it is said to have continued operating. 

The new tigers are said to be imported from Bangkok's Mallika Tiger Zoo.

KANCHANABURI, THAILAND - JUNE 1:  (EDITORS NOTE: Image contains graphic content.)  Thai DNP officers collect samples for DNA testing from the carcasses of 40 tiger cubs found undeclared at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple on June 1, 2016 in Kanchanaburi province, Thailand. Wildlife authorities in Thailand raided a Buddhist temple in Kanchanaburi province where 137 tigers were kept, following accusations the monks were illegally breeding and trafficking endangered animals. Forty of the 137 tigers were rescued by Tuesday from the country's infamous 'Tiger Temple' despite opposition from the temple authorities. (Photo by Dario Pignatelli/Getty Images)
Thai DNP officers collect samples for DNA testing from the carcasses of 40 tiger cubs found undeclared at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple. Source: Getty

National Geographic reported the Tiger Temple is not legally connected to the new zoo, and the company changed its name from Tiger Temple Co. Ltd to Golden Tiger (Thailand) Co. Ltd in February last year. 

It comes after dead tiger cubs were found undeclared at the Wat Pha Luang Ta Bua Tiger Temple in 2016. 

Over 140 tigers were taken from the Tiger Temple, with energy drinks containing tiger contents and cubs kept in jars also being found, according to Khaosod. 

The director of Thailand's Wildlife Conservation Office, Teunjai Noochdumrong, told Associated Press in 2016 that 40 tigers were tranquilised and removed in two days.

Tourists were able to pat and take photos with the tigers at the Tiger Temple. 


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