Violent clashes continue in Kenyan shantytown following election

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Associated Press

In an escalation of Kenya's deadly election violence, police fired live ammunition at rioters and used tear gas on vehicles carrying opposition officials trying to enter a Nairobi slum where they have strong support.

Rioting and violence has escalated with police firing live ammunition in the Nairobi’s slum.
Source: Associated Press

A young girl was killed by a stray bullet, nine bodies with gunshot wounds were brought overnight to the capital's main morgue, and a watchdog group said police gunfire has killed 24 people since Wednesday's disputed vote.

Seventeen of the two dozen people shot by police died in Nairobi, the commission said. It cited allegations of police breaking into homes, beating people, threatening them with rape and demanding money. The watchdog group also lamented "the destruction of private property by both civilians and allegedly by security personnel in the course of their duty."

Police shot and killed two people during riots by opposition supporters on the outskirts of Kisumu, a regional police commander, Leonard Katana, said Saturday. Another five people were injured by gunfire in Kisumu, Katana said.

In Mathare, where Odinga has significant support, police opened fire to disperse protesters who blocked roads and set up burning barricades. Associated Press photographers saw police charging demonstrators and firing live rounds and tear gas.

One Mathare resident, Wycliff Mokaya, told The Associated Press that his 9-year-old daughter was killed by a stray bullet while on the third-floor balcony of their home.

"I was watching her play with her friends when she suddenly fell down," Mokaya said. "She was my only hope."

Nine bodies with gunshot wounds were brought to the Nairobi morgue from Mathare, a mortuary official said. 

An Associated Press photographer said police used tear gas on a large opposition convoy trying to enter the Kibera slum. Police also fired shots in the air.

The Kenya Red Cross said it helped a total of 93 people who were injured during the clashes since the election results were announced.

Police harassed and assaulted at least four journalists covering the violence, witnesses said.

The unrest followed a victory speech in which Kenyatta, whose father was Kenya's first president after independence from British colonial rule, said he was extending a "hand of friendship" to the opposition.

The unrest also exposed divisions in a society where poverty and government corruption have angered large numbers of Kenyans, including those who have been protesting in the slums and see Odinga as a voice for their grievances.

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