Video: Incredible moment ferry slams into dock and sends containers flying in the Caribbean

A massive ferry in the Caribbean port of Santo Domingo has been caught on camera as it crashes into the dock in spectacular fashion, leaving a mass of crushed containers in its wake.

The Kydon ferry crashed into the dock around 8am local time yesterday during docking manoeuvres, according to vessel tracking website FleetMon.

The dramatic footage shows the moment the vessel slowly grinds its way down the dock, with a gangway collecting containers behind it, before eventually coming to rest.

Wide angle drone footage then shows the full scale of the damage as workers in high-vis vests look to asses the scene.

No one was reported injured in the incident.


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Hurricane Florence weakens as its outer winds hit US, but storm still regarded as lethal

The outer bands of wind and rain from a weakened but still lethal Hurricane Florence began lashing North Carolina on Thursday as the monster storm moved in for a prolonged and potentially catastrophic drenching along the Southeast coast.

Florence's winds had dropped from a peak of 225 kph to 165 kph by midmorning, reducing the hurricane from a terrifying Category 4 to a 2. But forecasters warned that the widening storm — and its likelihood of lingering around the coast day after day — will bring seawater surging onto land and torrential downpours.

"It truly is really about the whole size of this storm," National Hurricane Centre Director Ken Graham said. "The larger and the slower the storm is, the greater the threat and the impact - and we have that."

It’s predicted the fierce weather system will linger over the Carolina coast for days, not hours. Source: 1 NEWS

As of 11 a.m. EDT, Florence was centred about 230 kilometres southeast of Wilmington, its forward movement slowed to 17 kph. Hurricane-force winds extended 80 miles 130 kilometres from its centre, and tropical-storm-force winds up to 315 kilometres.

Forecasters said Florence's eye could come ashore early Friday around the North Carolina-South Carolina line. Then it is likely to hover along the coast Saturday, pushing up to nearly 4 metres of storm surge and unloading water on both states.

By midday, Spanish moss blew sideways in the trees as the winds increased in Wilmington. On North Carolina's Outer Banks, water flowed through streets and between beachfront homes, and some of the few people still left in Nags Head took photos of angry waves topped with white froth.

The forecast calls for as much as 102 centimetres of rain over seven days along the coast, with the deluge continuing even as the centre of the storm pushes its way over the Appalachian Mountains.

The result could be what the Houston area saw during Hurricane Harvey just over a year ago: catastrophic inland flooding that could swamp homes, businesses, farms and industrial sites.

The police chief of a barrier island in Florence's bulls'-eye said he was asking for next-of-kin contact information from the few residents who refused to leave.

"I'm not going to put our personnel in harm's way, especially for people that we've already told to evacuate," Wrightsville Beach Police Chief Dan House said.

North Carolina Gov. Roy Cooper urged residents to remain alert despite changing forecasts.

"Don't relax, don't get complacent. Stay on guard. This is a powerful storm that can kill. Today the threat becomes a reality," he said.

About 5.25 million people live in areas under hurricane warnings or watches, and 4.9 million in places covered by tropical storm warnings or watches, the National Weather Service said.

Weather Underground meteorology director Jeff Masters said Florence eventually could strike as a Category 1 with winds less than 160 kph, but that's still enough to cause at least $1 billion in damage. Water kills more people in hurricanes than wind does.

Scientists said it is too soon to say what role, if any, global warming played in the storm. But previous research has shown that the strongest hurricanes are getting wetter, more intense and intensifying faster because of human-caused climate change.

It's unclear exactly how many people fled ahead of the storm, but more than 1.7 million people in the Carolinas and Virginia were warned to clear out.

Airlines cancelled about 1,200 flights and counting, and some airports in the Carolinas virtually shut down. Home Depot and Lowe's activated emergency response centres and sent in around 1,100 trucks to get generators, trash bags and bottled water to stores before and after the storm.

Duke Energy, the nation's No. 2 power company, said Florence could knock out electricity to three-quarters of its 4 million customers in the Carolinas, and outages could last for weeks. Workers are being brought in from the Midwest and Florida to help in the storm's aftermath, it said.

Florence's weakening as it neared the coast created tension between some who left home and authorities who worried that the storm could still be deadly.

Frustrated after evacuating his beach home for a storm that has since been downgraded, retired nurse Frederick Fisher grumbled in the lobby of a hotel in Wilmington several miles inland.

"Against my better judgement, due to emotionalism, I evacuated," he said. "I've got four cats inside the house. If I can't get back in a week, after a while they might turn on each other or trash the place."

Body surfer Andrew Vanotteren, of Savannah, Ga., crashes into waves from Hurricane Florence, Wednesday, Sept., 12, 2018, on the south beach of Tybee Island, Ga. Vanotteren and his friend Bailey Gaddis said the waves have gotten bigger and better every evening as the storm approaches. (AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton)
A body surfer takes advantage of the waves in Georgia. Source: Associated Press


Appeal made against nine-year jail sentence handed to killer of Queensland toddler

The Queensland government is appealing the nine-year jail sentence handed down to the man who killed Caboolture toddler Mason Jet Lee in 2016.

Attorney General Yvette D'Ath said today she has lodged an appeal against the manslaughter sentence given to William Andrew O'Sullivan on August 30.

"Today an appeal has been lodged in the Mason Jet Lee case on my behalf after I gave consideration to the advice provided by the Director of Public Prosecution," Ms D'Ath told journalists.

"The grounds on which this appeal has been lodged is that we believe the sentence is manifestly inadequate and on that basis this appeal is being progressed."

Ms D'Ath said she wouldn't comment any further as the matter went through the legal process.

O'Sullivan, 37, was also convicted of child cruelty after failing to seek medical care when the boy suffered a broken leg and severe anal injuries about six months before he was killed in June 2016

The sentence handed down by Chief Justice Catherine Holmes means he could walk free in four years with time already served.

Mason's final hours were spent wrapped in a towel, lips blue, making grunting noises.

Traces of methamphetamine were found in his blood after he died.

O'Sullivan, who had long battled an addiction to drugs, particularly ice, tried to cover up his involvement in the little boy's death by blaming paramedics for taking too long to respond.

But they had taken only six minutes to arrive after being called by a friend.

He also lied to police by saying he found Mason with his lips blue and mouth clamped on a bottle before calling an ambulance and later claimed his 12-year- old "serial killer" daughter may have beaten him.

William O'Sullivan.

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Philippines starts massive evacuations as huge typhoon nears

Philippine authorities began evacuating thousands of people on Thursday (local time) from the path of the most powerful typhoon this year, closing schools, readying bulldozers for landslides and placing rescuers and troops on full alert in the country's north.

Filipino forecaster Meno Mendoza illustrates the path of Typhoon Mangkhut, locally named "Typhoon Ompong" as it approaches the Philippines with sustained winds of 205 kilometers per hour (127 miles per hour) and gusts of up to 255 kph (158 mph), at the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration in metropolitan Manila, Philippines on Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2018. Philippine officials say they plan to evacuate thousands of villagers, shut down schools and offices and scramble to harvest rice and corn as the most powerful typhoon so far this year menacingly roars toward the country's north. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
Typhoon Mangkhut. Source: Associated Press

More than 4 million people live in areas at most risk from the storm, which the Joint Typhoon Warning Center in Hawaii categorised as a super typhoon with powerful winds and gusts.

Typhoon Mangkhut could hit northeastern Cagayan province on Saturday. It was tracked on Thursday about 725 kilometres (450 miles) away in the Pacific with sustained winds of 205 kilometres (127 miles) per hour and gusts of up to 255 kph (158 mph), Philippine forecasters said.

With a massive raincloud band 900 kilometres (560 miles) wide, combined with seasonal monsoon rains, the typhoon could bring heavy to intense rains that could set off landslides and flash floods, the forecasters said. Storm warnings have been raised in 25 provinces across the main northern island of Luzon, restricting sea and air travel.

Office of Civil Defense chief Ricardo Jalad told an emergency meeting led by President Rodrigo Duterte that about 4.2 million people in Cagayan, nearby Isabela province and outlying provincial regions are vulnerable to the most destructive effects near the typhoon's 125-kilometre (77-mile) -wide eye. Nearly 48,000 houses in those high-risk areas are made of light materials and vulnerable to Mangkhut's ferocious winds.

Across the north on Thursday, residents covered glass windows with wooden boards, strengthened houses with rope and braces and moved fishing boats to safety.

Cagayan Gov. Manuel Mamba said by telephone that evacuations of residents from risky coastal villages and island municipalities north of the rice-and corn-producing province of 1.2 million people have started and school classes at all levels have been canceled.

"The weather here is still good but we're moving them now because it's very important that when it comes, people will be away from peril," Mamba said.

A change in the typhoon's track prompted authorities to rapidly reassess where to redeploy emergency teams and supplies, Mamba said.

Duterte asked Cabinet officials from the north to help oversee disaster-response work if needed, and told reporters it was too early to consider seeking foreign aid.

"It would depend on the severity of the crisis," Duterte said. "If it flattens everything, maybe we need to have some help."

The typhoon is approaching at the start of the rice and corn harvesting season in Cagayan, a major agricultural producer, and farmers were scrambling to save what they could of their crops, Mamba said. The threat to agriculture comes as the Philippines tries to cope with rice shortages.

Officials said other northern provinces started evacuating residents Thursday from high-risk areas, including in northern mountain provinces prone to landslides.

Duterte canceled his appearance at a missile test firing aboard a navy ship off northern Bataan province due to the approaching typhoon.

On Guam, where Mangkhut already passed, residents dealt with flooded streets, downed trees and widespread power outages. Government agencies were conducting damage assessments and clearing roads, according to the Pacific Daily News.

About 80 percent of the U.S. territory was without power but it was restored by Thursday morning.

Mangkhut, a Thai word for the mangosteen fruit, is the 15th storm this year to batter the Philippines, which is hit by about 20 a year and is considered one of the world's most disaster-prone countries. Typhoon Haiyan left more than 7,300 people dead or missing and displaced over 5 million in the central Philippines in 2013.

Typhoon Mangkhut, a category five storm, could bring winds of more than 280km/h. Source: 1 NEWS


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Trump rejects Puerto Rico hurricane death toll, blames Democrats

President Donald Trump on Thursday (Friday NZ Time) rejected the widely accepted conclusion that nearly 3,000 died in Puerto Rico from Hurricane Maria, arguing without evidence that the number was wrong and calling it a plot by Democrats to make him look bad.

The President has accused Jeff Zucker’s company of hatred and extreme bias towards him.
Source: 1 NEWS

As Hurricane Florence approached the Carolinas, the president picked a fresh fight over the administration's response in Puerto Rico, tweeting: "When I left the Island, AFTER the storm had hit, they had anywhere from 6 to 18 deaths. As time went by it did not go up by much. Then, a long time later, they started to report really large numbers, like 3000."

Trump added: "This was done by the Democrats in order to make me look as bad as possible when I was successfully raising Billions of Dollars to help rebuild Puerto Rico."

Puerto Rico's governor last month raised the U.S. territory's official death toll from Hurricane Maria from 64 to 2,975 after an independent study found that the number of people who succumbed in the sweltering aftermath had been severely undercounted.

The estimate of nearly 3,000 dead in the six months after Maria devastated the island in September 2017 and knocked out the entire electrical grid was made by researchers with the Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. The study says the original estimates were so low because doctors on the island had not been trained to properly classify deaths after a natural disaster.

The elderly and impoverished were hardest hit by the hurricane.


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