Video: Dozens take over Heathrow terminal, protesting against airport expansion by lying on the floor

Travellers at London and Europe's busiest airport seemed irritated as they had to footstep over climate change protesters lying on the floor yesterday afternoon (local time).

A small group of peaceful protesters staged a "die-in" at Heathrow's Terminal Two, with many wearing white masks to highlight the impact of air travel on carbon dioxide pollution levels.

Hundreds of like-minders dressed in red also took to the airport's surrounding streets staging a "bike block", which was reported by drivers to have caused "traffic carnage".

The demonstrations, organised by activist group Reclaim the Power, were an effort to avert the government's proposed decision to expand the airport and build a third runway.

Heathrow said the occasion did not affect any air travellers heading to their destinations.



127 dead after Tanzania ferry capsizes

Hundreds of solemn people watched Friday as body after body was pulled from a capsized ferry that Tanzanian authorities said was badly overcrowded and upended in the final stretch before reaching shore. The official death toll was 127 but horrified witnesses feared that would rise as a second day of searching neared an end.

President John Magufuli urged calm in the East African country with a history of deadly maritime disasters. And a criminal investigation began.

The MV Nyerere's capacity was 101 people but the ferry had been overloaded when it capsized Thursday afternoon, the government's Chief Secretary John Kijazi told reporters. He said those responsible will face charges.

At least 40 people had been rescued, he said, but the number on Friday barely rose. Dozens of security forces and volunteers wearing gloves and face masks had resumed work at daybreak after suspending efforts overnight, hauling bodies into wooden boats.

"More than 200 people are feared dead," based on accounts from fishermen and other witnesses, because passengers had been returning from a busy market day, Tanzania Red Cross spokeswoman Godfrida Jola told The Associated Press. "But no one knows" just how many people were on board.

Tanzanian ferries often carry hundreds of passengers and are overcrowded, and shifts in weight as people move to disembark can become deadly. Images from the scene showed the ferry's exposed underside not far from shore.

Bodies were lined up on plastic sheeting as hundreds of people pressed near the water's edge, watching the search efforts.

Pope Francis and a number of African leaders expressed shock and sorrow.

"His Holiness Pope Francis expresses his heartfelt solidarity with those who mourn the loss of their loved ones and who fear for the lives of those still missing," the condolence telegram said, according to the Vatican.

The MV Nyerere, named for the former president who led the East African nation to independence, was traveling between the islands of Ukara and Ukerewe when it sank, according to the government agency in charge of servicing the vessels.

Worried residents on Friday waited for any word of survivors.

"We try to make calls to friends, relatives," a local guide, Paschal Phares, told the AP. He recalled how crowded his trip on the aging ferry had been last month: "Most of us were standing up. It was full."

Accidents are often reported on the large freshwater lake surrounded by Tanzania, Kenya and Uganda. Some of the deadliest have occurred in Tanzania, where passenger boats are often said to be old and in poor condition.

In 1996, more than 800 people died when passenger and cargo ferry MV Bukoba sank on Lake Victoria.

More than 300 people were on board the ferry on Lake Victoria in Tanzania when disaster struck just metres from shore. Source: 1 NEWS

Nearly 200 people died in 2011 when the MV Spice Islander I sank off Tanzania's Indian Ocean coast near Zanzibar.

Rescuers retrieve a body from the water near Ukara Island in Lake Victoria, Tanzania Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. The death toll rose above 100 after the passenger ferry MV Nyerere capsized on Lake Victoria, Tanzania state radio reported Friday, while a second day of rescue efforts raced the setting sun. (AP Photo)
Source: Associated Press

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Vietnam's President Tran Dai Quang dies of illness at 61

Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang, the country's No. 2 after the ruling Communist Party's leader, died Friday after a serious illness, the government said. He was 61.

Quang passed away despite "utmost efforts to treat him by Vietnamese and foreign professors and doctors and care by the party and state leaders," the statement said. It said Quang died at a military hospital in Hanoi but did not elaborate on his illness.

The state-run online newspaper VnExpress quoted a former health minister and the head of a national committee in charge of leaders' health, Nguyen Quoc Trieu, as saying that Quang had contracted a rare and toxic virus since July last year and had traveled to Japan six times for treatment. He did not specify the virus.

Trieu said the president lapsed into a deep coma hours after being admitted to the National Military Hospital 108 on Thursday afternoon (local time).

"Japanese professors and doctors treated him and helped consolidate the president's health for about a year," Trieu said. "However, there are no medicines in the world that can cure the illness completely, instead it only could prevent and push it back for some time."

Quang hosted President Donald Trump during his first state visit to the communist country last year, when Trump attended a summit of Pacific Rim leaders.

U.S Ambassador Daniel Kritenbrink praised Quang for his contributions to promote relations between the two former foes.
"His hosting of President Donald J. Trump's historic state visit to Hanoi in November 2017 helped advance the U.S.-Vietnam Comprehensive Partnership to new heights on the basis of mutual understanding, shared interests, and a common desire to promote peace, cooperation, prosperity, and security in the Indo-Pacific region," he said in a statement posted on the embassy's website.

Phil Roberston, deputy Asia director at Human Rights Watch, said that Quang would be remembered for "a multi-year crackdown on human rights and putting more political prisoners behind bars in Vietnam than any time in recent memory."

Some 97 activists have been jailed as of April this year, according to Amnesty International.

The Communist Party tolerates no challenge to its one-party rule and often jails people for peacefully expressing their views, though Hanoi maintains that only law breakers are put behind bars.

Quang's last public appearance was at a Politburo meeting of the ruling Communist Party and a reception for a Chinese delegation on Wednesday. He looked frail on the state-run Vietnam Television broadcast.

Quang did not appear in public for more than a month last year, raising speculation about his health.

Born in northern Ninh Binh province, Quang attended a police college and rose through the ranks at the powerful Ministry of Public Security before being appointed minister in 2011.

A career security officer and four-star general, Quang was elected president in April 2016 by the Communist Party-dominated National Assembly, effectively becoming the second most powerful man in the country after General Secretary Nguyen Phu Trong.

The National Assembly is scheduled to convene a session next month and expected to elect a new president.

Funeral arrangements were not immediately announced.

FILE - In this Sept. 13, 2018, file photo, Vietnam's President Tran Dai Quang meets with Myanmar's leader Aung San Suu Kyi at the Presidential Palace during the World Economic Forum on ASEAN in Hanoi, Vietnam. Official media say Vietnamese President Tran Dai Quang has died at age 61 due to illness on Friday, Sept. 21, 2018. (Kham/Pool Photo via AP, File)
Tran Dai Quang. Source: Associated Press


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'It's really going to take off from here' - Audi launch first ever electric car

Car manufacturer's Audi have launched their first ever electric car in San Francisco, showing off their new creation earlier this week.

Seven Sharp's Michael Holland was there at the release in the California city, the same location that Tesla pioneer Elon Musk launched his creation to the world.

Watch the video above for more.

Seven Sharp’s Michael Holland was there. Source: Seven Sharp


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Melbourne dad kills son after row over burnt omelette, court hears

Twenty minutes after an argument with his son about a burnt omelette, Peter John Smith assembled his shotgun, walked calmly inside and fired two fatal rounds into his son's chest.

Andrew Smith was 30 years old, a father of two little boys and several weeks into his latest attempt at getting off drugs.

He'd spent the afternoon having a few drinks in the backyard of his family's suburban Melbourne home with mum Kathleen and later his dad, and had gone inside with her to cook omelettes for tea.

It was just a week before Christmas last year.

In a Supreme Court plea hearing today, crown prosecutor Mark Rochford QC said Andrew went outside and tossed a burnt omelette on the ground, upsetting Smith who thought their dog might get sick.

"F*** the dogs, f*** you. You'll be dead in a year," he told his father, who had recently had bowel cancer surgery.

Smith tried to punch his son, missed and the pair wrestled on the ground for a moment before Andrew went inside to bed.

Smith sat down for dinner with his wife, put on his dressing gown and went to the caravan parked in their driveway.

From under the bed he retrieved a shotgun, assembled it, put ammunition inside and walked back to the house.

He passed his wife on the way, telling her "I'm going to kill the c*** and kill myself".

She didn't think he was serious and replied, "yeah right, of course you are".

He continued inside, opened his son's bedroom door, turned on the light and fired two shots through his son's chest. Both caused fatal injuries.

Smith dismantled the gun, left it in the living room and went outside to tell his wife to call the police.

He later told investigators: "I think I might have lost it a bit".

Smith, who is in his early 70s, pleaded guilty to murder in July. He also admitted possessing unregistered rifles and a shotgun.

His lawyer Richard Edney said Smith was suffering from undiagnosed and untreated depression.

He said his son Andrew had been in a repetitive cycle of using ice, synthetic marijuana and abstinence.

The Smiths had paid between $30,000 and $40,000 for him to attend rehab, while also supporting him at home.

Mr Edney said Smith told police he had "just had enough over the years", leading Justice Andrew Tinney to suggest the egg argument may have been the last straw.

"I couldn't put up with any more. Just making everyone miserable," Smith told police.

Justice Tinney was unconvinced depression played a role in Smith's actions. He also said it did not appear to be a case of someone snapping and flying off the handle.

"Although incredibly unexpected and extreme behaviour, it was not some momentary loss of judgment," he said.

He said trying to explain Mr Smith's actions that night may be impossible.

Smith will be sentenced at a later date.

Loading bullets into a shotgun
Loading bullets into a shotgun. Source: Breakfast