Stormy Daniels arrives in court for Trump hearing - and nearly stumbles while evading media

Porn actress Stormy Daniels was swarmed by photographers and nearly fell as she was hustled into a federal courthouse overnight, a scene that captured the atmosphere around a legal fight involving the president and an FBI investigation into his personal attorney.

Wearing a pink suit and high heels, Daniels was the main attraction — for the media anyway — at a court hearing before a federal judge considering what to do with records and electronic devices that the FBI seized last week in raids on President Donald Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen.

The April 9 raid sought information on a variety of matters, including a $US130,000 payment made to Daniels, who alleges she had sex with a married Trump in 2006.

At issue is exactly who gets to look at Cohen's seized documents and devices before they are turned over to prosecutors. Attorneys for Cohen say they want first crack.

Trump's lawyers say they also want some form of prior review.

Another option is to set up a "special master" who will vet the material to determine what is protected and what isn't; that is the Cohen team's second choice.

Prosecutors, who say they raided Cohen's office, home and hotel room as part of an undisclosed crime related to his personal business dealings, prefer the ordinary procedure of reviewing the documents with a panel of prosecutors unrelated to the investigation — a so-called "taint team."

At stake is an investigation that could get at the heart of Trump's longtime fixer and image protector.

People familiar with the probe told The Associated Press that agents were seeking bank records, records on Cohen's dealing in the taxi industry, Cohen's communications with the Trump campaign and information on payments made in 2016 to two women who say they had affairs with Trump, former Playboy model Karen McDougal and the porn star Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford.

Lawyers for Cohen filed papers Monday saying investigators "took everything" during raids last week, including more than a dozen electronic devices.

They said that prosecutors had already intercepted emails from Cohen and executed the search warrants only after discovering that there were no emails between Trump and Cohen.

One of Trump's lawyers, Joanna Hendon, filed papers late Sunday asking a federal judge to block prosecutors from studying material seized in the raid until Cohen and the president have both had a chance to review those materials and argue which are subject to attorney-client privilege.

"Fairness and justice — as well as the appearance of fairness and justice — require that, before they are turned over to the Investigative Team, the seized materials relating to the President must be reviewed by the only person who is truly motivated to ensure that the privilege is properly invoked and applied: the privilege-holder himself, the President," Hendon wrote.

Hendon proposed yet another level of protections, in which Cohen's lawyers, after finishing their initial review, would then be required to "identify to the president all seized materials that relate to him in any way and provide a copy of those materials to him and his counsel."

Cohen, who has denied wrongdoing, arrived early Monday afternoon (US time). He did not attend Friday's hearing and was then ordered by the judge to appear in court Monday to help answer questions about his law practice.

Trump said yesterday that all lawyers are now "deflated and concerned" by the FBI raid on Cohen.

"Attorney Client privilege is now a thing of the past," he tweeted. "I have many (too many!) lawyers and they are probably wondering when their offices, and even homes, are going to be raided with everything, including their phones and computers, taken. All lawyers are deflated and concerned!"



Scott Morrison says nation must embrace divisive Australia Day, but calls for another day to recognise indigenous Australians

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says the nation must embrace Australia Day "warts and all", but has called for another day to be set aside to recognise indigenous Australians.

Mr Morrison says January 26, 1778 is when "the ships turned up" in Australia.

"We can't pretend that it's some other day that it happened ... we've got to embrace it all, warts and all," he told the Nine Network today.

But Mr Morrison believes there should be a separate day to acknowledge 60,000 years of indigenous history.

"We don't have to pull Australia Day down to actually recognise the achievements of indigenous Australians, the oldest living culture in the world," he told the Seven Network.

"The two can coexist."

The federal government has stripped a NSW council of its right to hold citizenship ceremonies, after it refused to hold them on the national holiday, opting instead for January 25.

Mr Morrison said if council's such as Byron Shire Council want to treat citizenship ceremonies like a "political football", the Commonwealth can easily go elsewhere.

"Citizenship is about the citizens, it's not about the egos of councillors," he said.

Deputy Labor leader Tanya Plibersek said the opposition also supports Australia Day remaining on January 26 and is open to the idea of an additional day to recognise indigenous Australians.

But Labor is disappointed the prime minister has flouted such a "significant idea" through the media without consultation.

"It's disrespectful," she tweeted.

"Unlike Scott Morrison, we'll consult indigenous people and our indigenous caucus about whether a proper day of recognition with an additional public holiday is a positive way forward - we're open to it."

Byron Mayor Simon Richardson has said Australia Day caused pain in a section of the community and questioned whether the values of a fair go and mateship were being reflected.

"Is it true mateship to willingly, willfully and continually to celebrate what rightfully is great to be an Australian on a day that some Australians are pained by?" the Greens mayor told 3AW.

Immigration Minister David Coleman said citizenship ceremonies should be about bringing communities together.

"The council's actions are divisive and the Australian government will not stand by and allow this to happen," he said.

The government last year removed the right to host citizenship ceremonies from Melbourne's City of Yarra and Darebin councils after they voted not to hold them on January 26.

Commonwealth Games hold an indigenous welcome
Source: Te Karere


Topics

TODAY'S
TOP STORIES

Perth mum who accused kids of hanging daughter from tree with skipping rope handed restraining order

A Perth mother is readying for a court battle, following a much publicised bullying case involving her daughter.

Belinda Yoon's 10-year old daughter Amber was allegedly hung from a tree with a skipping rope, but is now facing a restraining order from the parents of the children accused of doing it.

In an emotional post on social media, Ms Yoon spoke about her frustrations in the apparent protection of her daughter's abusers.

"Apparently I've been driving past their house in an agitated state, for one I had no idea about their first names or even where they lived," a tearful Ms Yoon said.

"I'd love to know how they could cause us even more heartache, when we have already hurt enough.

"Let us heal, let us try and move on from this and I was trying to do that in a really positive way to try and create change for everybody.

"It feels like I'm almost getting bullied myself because they just want me to be silenced and I won't be."

Ms Yoon will appear in the magistrates court next month, saying she will challenge the restraining order.

“She honestly thought she was going to die,” Amber Yoon said through tears of her 10-year-old daughter. Source: Nine


Topics

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

‘He led the struggle’ – Jacinda Ardern pays tribute to Nelson Mandela at UN speech

New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern helped honor the memory of Nelson Mandela at a peace summit for the late South African leader.

Mandela, who led South Africa's transition from the apartheid system of white minority rule over the majority black population was a "living embodiment of the United Nation's values," Ardern said.

In the year since she took office, Ardern, 38, has enjoyed unprecedented global attention for a leader from this nation of fewer than 5 million people.

Yet at home, she's faced political pressure as she tries to keep control of a coalition government that sometimes threatens to come apart.

Internationally, Ardern in many ways offers a counterpoint to President Donald Trump: She is young, liberal and espouses an empathetic approach to leadership.

She's also pushed the boundaries for women by becoming just the second world leader in modern times to give birth while in office.

Mandela, who led South Africa's transition from the apartheid was a "living embodiment of the United Nation's values," Ardern said Source: Associated Press


Amazing footage of derailed train that fell into US river shows extent of destruction

No injuries have been reported after a train derailed Sunday in northwest Iowa and 20 cars carrying soybean oil and sand fell into the flooded Floyd River.

Drone video from the Sioux County Sheriff's Office showed more than a dozen mangled railcars in the river.

No injuries have been reported after a train derailed on Monday in Iowa, with 20 cars carrying soybean oil and sand falling into a flooded river. Source: Associated Press