Pauline Hanson says girl, nine, who refused to stand for Australian national anthem at school deserves 'kick up the backside'

Pauline Hanson says a Queensland "brat" who refused to stand for the Australian national anthem should be kicked out of school.

Kenmore South State School grade four student Harper Nielsen, aged nine, was given detention and threatened with suspension for not standing when Advance Australia Fair was played in assembly.

She said she believes the lyrics "we are young" marginalises Indigenous people.

"The reason why I don't sing it or stand is because Advance Australia Fair means advance White Australia," she told The Courier-Mail.

"When it says we are young it completely ignores the fact that indigenous culture was here for over 50,000 years before colonisation."
Harper has the support of her "proud" dad Mark.

"She's shown incredible bravery in wanting to stick to what she believes in and to make a stance for what she believes is right", he told ABC radio today.

But the stance has angered Senator Hanson, who posted a video on Facebook calling for Harper to be kicked out of school.

"Here we have a kid whose been brainwashed and I tell you what, I'd give her a kick up the backside," the One Nation leader said.

"This kid is headed down the wrong path and I blame the parents for it, for encouraging this.

"No. Take her out of the school."

Senator Hanson said there was support for the anthem amongst the indigenous community as sporting stars regularly stood for the anthem.

"I'm angry about this. I'm proud of the Australian flag and the national anthem as everyone should be and so was Cathy Freeman," she said.

"We were all proud of her, her cultural background, the Aboriginality, and the whole fact that she carried the two flags.

"She stood at the podium with the national anthem being played. Have they told this kid that?

"If it's good enough for Cathy Freeman, Johnathon Thurston, and Warren Mundine to stand for the National anthem, it should be good enough for this nine-year- old brat."

Shadow education minister Jarrod Bleijie echoed Senator Hanson's words, saying on Twitter she deserved suspension if she continued her protest.

"Stop the silly protest and stand and sing proudly your National Anthem. Refusing to stand disrespects our country and our veterans. Suspension should follow if she continues to act like a brat," he tweeted.


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US woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart, kept her captive for nine months, to be released

A woman convicted of helping a former street preacher kidnap Elizabeth Smart as a teenager from her Salt Lake City bedroom in 2002 and hold her captive will be released from prison next week.

The surprise move a comes after authorities determined they had miscalculated the time 72-year-old Wanda Barzee previously served in federal custody.

Barzee pleaded guilty to kidnapping Smart and helping keep her captive for nine months before Smart was found and rescued.

Utah Board of Pardons and Parole spokesman Greg Johnson said Barzee will be freed on Sept. 19. She will be under federal supervision for five years.

Smart, now 30, didn't immediately have comment.

The board said previously that Barzee would be released in January 2024 after it denied her an early parole following a hearing that she chose not to attend.

Wanda Barzee helped kidnap Smart from her Salt Lake City bedroom in 2002. Source: Associated Press

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Watch: Jacinda Ardern says Simon Bridges is 'jealous' of Government during heated exchange over starting wage

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said National leader Simon Bridges is "jealous" of the Government, during a heated exchange over the starting wage in Parliament's Question Time today.

Mr Bridges was seeking clarification on whether the starting wage (also known as the youth rate) would be abolished in October, after he said a press statement from Iain Lees-Galloway in December stated this would be the case.

Ms Ardern didn't answer the question directly, instead giving a passionate defence of her Government's processes.

"It's clear that we have established policy between this coalition Government that is set out in the public domain, everything else goes through a Cabinet process.

"Now I know the member continues to be jealous that he is not on this side of the House in the position to make the changes that this Government has made and that we have achieved in one year more than that government achieved in nine, but we stick to a process," she said.

National's deputy leader Paula Bennett could then be heard saying that "the fairy dust has settled" before Mr Bridges continued to press the Prime Minister.

"So when Iain Lees-Galloway said in December in a ministerial press statement that we will abolish starting out wages by October 2018 was that just a personal commitment?" he asked.

Ms Ardern answered again that the coalition Government follows a process, saying Mr Bridges might find it hard to understand how three parties can work together.

"So can we no longer believe ministerial press statements unless they are signed off by Mr Peters?" Mr Bridges replied.

"No, ridiculous," was Ms Ardern's brief response.

The starting-out wage applies solely to workers aged between 16 and 19 and who are entering the workforce for the first time and is currently set at $13.20 per hour.


 

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California woman allegedly invents fake husband to scam thousands of dollars

A woman in California is suspected of inventing a fake firefighter husband to scam donors out of thousands of dollars and supplies.

Ashley Bemis is accused of using social media to get donations which she says were for firefighters battling recent deadly wildfires in the US state.

Police say she used a Facebook group to reach out for help for her fake firefighter husband and his colleagues.

Ms Bemis then allegedly pocketed cash and sold items that were donated to line her own pockets.

Police say the money and goods total around $US11,000 worth.

Ms Bemis has not been charged.


Charities pledge $700m to fight deforestation worldwide, by giving more power to indigenous groups

A coalition of charitable groups and the government of Norway pledged today to spend well over half a billion dollars over the next four years to prevent deforestation internationally and recognise indigenous peoples' rights to manage forests.

The charitable groups pledged NZ$704 million to help indigenous groups gain rights to the forests where they live and to help them protect their land. The government of Norway pledged another NZ$50 million to help prevent deforestation in Indonesia and Brazil.

The coalition of more than 15 organisations and Norway made the announcement ahead of an international climate change summit in San Francisco. It includes the Ford and the Rockefeller foundations.

"Evidence shows indigenous communities are the most effective stewards of the land they inhabit and in doing so, they are ensuring that the greenhouse gas levels do not do irreversible damage to people and the planet," said Darren Walker, president of the Ford Foundation.

The funds will support those working to protect, restore and expand forests, help communities make land use more sustainable and empower indigenous people by teaching them about their rights.

National, however, is accusing Shane Jones of flinging money around. Source: 1 NEWS

The endeavour is separate from a New Zealand programme in which the Government has allocated nearly $500 million to the goal of planting 1 billion trees. About $240 million of that was announced last month, when Forestry Minister Shane Jones explained that iwi, private land owners and non-government organisations will be able to apply for the money to cover planting costs.

Mr Jones estimated that the $240 million injection will result in 60 million new trees and the creation of 1000 jobs over the next three years.

In San Francisco today, Vicky Tauli-Corpuz, the United Nations Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, said that to prevent deforestation, the rights of indigenous people need to be secured and governments need to protect those fighting for land and the environment.

About half of the forests in the world are managed by indigenous people but only 15 per cent of those lands are legally recognized as belonging to them, she said, adding that more than 200 land and environmental activists, many of them indigenous, were killed last year.

"If our rights as indigenous peoples are recognized, we can continue to protect these lands for generations to come," she said.

Scientists say forests already remove 30 per cent of carbon emissions added to the atmosphere each year but rampant deforestation driven by a growing demand for animal protein, soy and wood products is undermining trees and the soil's capacity to store carbon.

They say the time to achieve the most ambitious goal - limiting a rise in average global temperatures to 1.5 degrees Celsius by 2100 - has almost passed and that preserving and expanding forests is critical to fighting climate change.

The party wants to move and shake things up when it comes to climate change. Source: 1 NEWS

Erazo Yaiguaje, an indigenous Siona man from South America, travelled from the Colombian Amazon to San Francisco to share his tribe's plight in getting the government to recognize their ancestral land and to publicize his people's fight against cattle ranchers and efforts to clear land mines left behind by a rebel group.

The ranchers, he said, started arriving in the Putumayo areas once occupied by rebels with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, who in 2016 laid down their guns after they and the Colombian government reached a peace deal.

Mr Yaiguaje said his tribe lives in 11,000 acres (4,450 hectares) but that the government has refused to recognize their land encompasses 128,000 acres (51,800 hectares).

"The pledge recognises the importance of indigenous peoples and how from the forest and the jungle, we're helping the world," Mr Yaiguaje said.

But he said he hopes the money gets to those it intends to help.

"These funds are usually given to the government and our communities see very little of it," he added.

They’re frustrated with what they say is a lack of Government action.
Source: 1 NEWS