Meghan Markle's father reportedly to undergo heart surgery, won't be able to attend daughter's wedding to Prince Harry

Meghan Markle’s father will reportedly not be able to walk her down the aisle because he is scheduled to undergo heart surgery.

Thomas Markle, who told TMZ this morning that he changed his mind and wanted to attend the wedding after yesterday saying he would not go, is scheduled to undergo surgery in the early hours of Thursday morning (Wednesday morning LA time).

FILE - In this April 25, 2018 file photo, Britain's Prince Harry and Meghan Markle attend a Service of Thanksgiving and Commemoration on ANZAC Day at Westminster Abbey in London. The couple will wed on May 19. (Eddie Mulholland/Pool via AP, File)
Prince Harry and Meghan Markle were reportedly devastated over Thomas Markle's decision to not attend the wedding before his change of heart. Source: Associated Press

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For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6pm. Source: 1 NEWS

"They will go in and clear blockage, repair damage and put a stent where it is needed," Thomas Markle told the celebrity news website.

Last week, Mr Markle reportedly suffered a heart attack and was then hospitalised this morning (NZ time) with chest pain.

In an earlier report, Mr Markle said his daughter had tried to call him on Tuesday but he didn't have his phone on him, according to the celebrity news site.

He said she also texted saying she loved him and was concerned about his health.

Mr Markle said Meghan was not upset after his staged paparazzi photos. He was reportedly so upset by the reaction the photos that he decided to not attend the wedding.

He also said he didn’t think the Queen would be bothered by the photos.

"I don't think the Queen is thinking about what I'm doing."

"I hate the idea of missing one of the greatest moments in history and walking my daughter down the aisle."

If doctors allowed him out of hospital, Mr Markle said he will travel to England for the wedding.

Yesterday, Prince Harry and Ms Markle requested "understanding and respect" for her father after the celebrity news site reported he would not be coming to the royal wedding to walk his daughter down the aisle.

Thomas Markle's decision is a bombshell for the bride-to-be. Source: 1 NEWS

Yesterday’s palace statement on the "difficult situation" did not confirm the TMZ report that Thomas Markle had decided not to attend. 



North Korea threatens to cancel Trump and Kim Jong Un's summit over US-South Korea military exercises

North Korea cancelled a high-level meeting today with South Korea and threatened also to call off a historic summit planned later this month with the United States due to ongoing military exercises between the South and the US, South Korea's Yonhap news agency reported.

The two Koreas were set to hold a meeting later today at a border truce village to discuss setting up military and Red Cross talks aimed at reducing border tension and restarting reunions between families separated by the Korean War.

The President took to Twitter to saw they would try make it a "special moment" for world peace.
Source: 1 NEWS

But hours before the meeting was to take place, Pyongyang cancelled the meeting and also questioned whether next month's talks between North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and President Donald Trump would happen, Yonhap reported, citing North Korea's Korean Central News Agency.

"The United States will also have to undertake careful deliberations about the fate of the planned North Korea-US summit in light of this provocative military ruckus jointly conducted with the South Korean authorities," KCNA reported.

The two-week military exercise between the US and South Korea started Friday and included about 100 warplanes, Yonhap said.

Yesterday, South Korea's military said North Korea was moving ahead with plans to close its nuclear test site next week, an assessment backed by US researchers who say satellite images show the North has begun dismantling facilities at the site.

The site's closure was set to come before Kim and Trump's summit, which had been shaping up to be a crucial moment in the global diplomatic push to resolve the nuclear standoff with the North.


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Newly-discovered dirty jokes found in Anne Frank's diary

Researchers using digital technology deciphered the writing on two pages of Anne Frank's diary that she had pasted over with brown masking paper, discovering four naughty jokes and a candid explanation of sex, contraception and prostitution.

"Anyone who reads the passages that have now been discovered will be unable to suppress a smile," said Frank van Vree, director of the Netherlands Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies. "The 'dirty' jokes are classics among growing children. They make it clear that Anne, with all her gifts, was above all also an ordinary girl."

Anne, age 13 at the time, wrote the two pages on Sept. 28, 1942, less than three months after she, her family and another Jewish family went into hiding from the Nazis in a secret annex behind a canal-side house in Amsterdam.

Later on, possibly fearing prying eyes or no longer liking what she had written, she covered them over with brown paper with an adhesive backing like a postage stamp, and their content remained a tantalising mystery for decades.

It turns out the pages contained four jokes about sex that Anne herself described as "dirty" and an explanation of women's sexual development, sex, contraception and prostitution.

"They bring us even closer to the girl and the writer Anne Frank," Ronald Leopold, executive director of the Anne Frank House museum, said.

Experts on Anne's multimillion-selling diary said the newly discovered text, when studied with the rest of her journal, reveals more about her development as a writer than it does about her interest in sex.

Anne wrote candidly in other parts of her diary about her burgeoning sexuality, her anatomy and her impending period. Those passages were censored by her father before the diary was first published in 1947 but became available in more recent unabridged editions.

Leopold said the newly deciphered material provides an early example of how Anne "creates a fictional situation that makes it easier for her to address the sensitive topics that she writes about." In her diary, for example, she addressed entries to a fictional friend named Kitty.

The institutions involved in the latest research said that because of copyright issues, it is unclear whether the passages will be incorporated into new editions.

The deciphering was done by researchers from the Anne Frank museum, the Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies and the Huygens Institute of Netherlands History.

They photographed the pages, backlit by a flash, and then used image-processing software to decipher the words, which were hard to read because they were jumbled up with the writing on the reverse sides of the pages.

In the passage on sex, Anne described how a young woman gets her period around age 14, saying that it is "a sign that she is ripe to have relations with a man but one doesn't do that of course before one is married."

On prostitution, she wrote: "All men, if they are normal, go with women, women like that accost them on the street and then they go together. In Paris they have big houses for that. Papa has been there."

One of her jokes was this: "Do you know why the German Wehrmacht girls are in Holland? As mattresses for the soldiers."

She also related this joke: "A man had a very ugly wife and he didn't want to have relations with her. One evening he came home and then he saw his friend in bed with his wife, then the man said: 'He gets to and I have to!!!'"

Anne wrote her diary while she and her family hid for more than two years during World War II. The family went into hiding in July 1942 and remained there, provided with food and other essentials by a close-knit group of helpers, until Aug. 4, 1944, when they were discovered and ultimately deported to Auschwitz.

Only Anne's father, Otto Frank, survived the war. Anne and her sister died in Bergen-Belsen camp. Anne was 15.

After the war, Otto Frank had his daughter's diary published, and it went on to become a symbol of hope and resilience that has been translated into dozens of languages.

The house where the Franks hid was turned into a museum that is one of Amsterdam's most popular tourist attractions.