'Like right out of that movie Jaws' - man killed by shark off Cape Cod on US east coast

A man was bitten by a shark today in the water off a Cape Cod beach and died later at a hospital, becoming the state's first shark attack fatality in more than 80 years.

The 26-year-old man from Revere succumbed to his injuries following the attack off Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet at around noon, Wellfleet Police Lieutenant Michael Hurley said.

Joe Booth, a local fisherman and surfer, said he was on shore when he saw the man and his friend boogie boarding when the attack happened.

He said he saw the man aggressively kick something behind him and a flicker of a tail from the water. He realised what was happening when the friend came ashore dragging his injured friend.

"I was that guy on the beach screaming, 'Shark, shark!" Booth said. "It was like right out of that movie Jaws. This has turned into Amity Island real quick out here."

Booth said others on the beach attempted to make a tourniquet while others frantically called 911.

Hayley Williamson, a Cape Cod resident and former lifeguard who was on the beach at the time, was in disbelief after the man was rushed into an ambulance.

"We've been surfing all morning right here and they were just further down," she said of the two boogie boarders. "Right spot, wrong time, I guess."

Life-saving measures were attempted on the beach before the man was taken to Cape Cod Hospital in Hyannis, where he was pronounced dead, State Police spokesman David Procopio said. The beach has been closed to swimming.

The family of the victim was notified of the death but his name was not released, Procopio said.

It was the first fatal shark attack in Massachusetts since 1936, and the second shark attack this season.

A 61-year-old New York man was severely injured August 15 after fighting off a shark off Truro, not far from today's attack. He's currently recovering in a Boston hospital.

"Today is just keeping everyone out of water," Hurley said. "There'll be a determination later about what the town wants to do with the beaches going forward."

Beachgoers said the Wellfleet beach is popular with surfers, and with sunny skies and warm temperatures today it was busy, even though the summer season was over and lifeguards were no longer on watch.

There have been frequent shark sightings this summer along the outer Cape, often leading to beach closings. The National Park Service, which manages many of the picturesque beaches where white sharks tend to congregate, said it closed beaches for at least an hour about 25 times this year - more than double the annual average.

A Cape Cod politician said officials who did not take more aggressive action against sharks bore some responsibility for the fatal attack.

Barnstable County Commissioner Ron Beaty said he had warned something like this could happen and urged measures to reduce the number of white sharks.

"It is my personal belief that the responsibility for this horrible shark attack rests squarely upon the shoulders of the aforementioned officials for their utter lack of attention and inaction regarding the growing shark problem on Cape Cod of the last few years," he said.

The state's last shark attack fatality was on July 25, 1936, when 16-year-old Joseph Troy Jr. was bitten in waters off Mattapoisett.

Troy, of Boston's Dorchester neighborhood, was visiting an uncle and was swimming about 50 feet offshore when the shark attacked.

Two people look out at the shore after a reported shark attack at Newcomb Hollow Beach in Wellfleet, Massachusetts. Source: Associated Press



New financial crisis is already in the making, former Lehman Brothers boss claims

The former managing director of Lehman Brothers at the time of its collapse has warned that a new financial crisis is already in the making.

Today marks ten years to the day since the financial services company Lehman Brothers, a titan of Wall Street, surrendered to bankruptcy.

Stock markets shuddered and then collapsed in a panic that US government officials struggled to stop.

Tom Russo, a former managing director and chief legal officer of the bank, told Britain's Sky News that Lehman Brothers should never have been allowed to collapse, adding that "the seeds of the next financial crisis are probably being ordered right now."

Speaking in New Jersey, he said the process of leverage - a measure of corporate debt - will once again be to blame.

His view was shared by British Progressive Economy Forum council member Ann Pettifor, who told Sky that a "rise in interest rates is going to be the trigger."

Pettifor predicted the last financial crisis in 2006, more than two years before it actually struck. She also told Sky the process which will lead to a new crisis has already started.

According to the Sky report, the state of New Jersey was third worse in the US for home repossessions and many houses in the city of Newark have remained boarded up since the crash.

This weekend marks 10 years since the financial services company Lehman Brothers, a titan of Wall Street, surrendered to bankruptcy. Source: Associated Press

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Man charged after Aussie cop struck by car during group motorbike ride for police who died in the line of duty

A 21-year-old man is in custody after a police officer in the Australian state of Victoria was hit by a car and killed while taking part in a group ride to commemorate police who died in the line of duty.

Victoria Police say the car was travelling along the Princes Highway near Orbost in the state's east on Friday afternoon when it veered onto the opposite side of the road and struck the policeman's bike. He died at the scene.

The officer, who the Herald Sun have named as Detective Senior Sergeant Vic Kostiuk, was among 300 riders in the Wall to Wall Ride who set out from the Victoria Police Memorial in St Kilda Road, Melbourne, headed for Merimbula and then on to Canberra on Saturday.

A Botanic Ridge man is in custody charged with one count of culpable driving, police said.

He is due to appear at Latrobe Valley Magistrates Court on Monday.

Vic Kostiuk.
Vic Kostiuk. Source: Supplied


Queensland police hoping $100,000 reward will help identify who spiked strawberries with needles

Queensland police are yet to determine who is spiking store-sold strawberries with needles.

But they're hopeful a $A100,000 reward for information will lead to the capture of the culprit or culprits.

Consumers have been told to cut their strawberries up amid fears six brands across four states have been targeted with needle insertion.

Read more: Aussie strawberry scandal causes concern in New Zealand

"Our investigation is ongoing. It's fairly complex and fairly large because of the itinerant nature of employees in the industry," Detective Superintendent Terry Lawrence said.

"I won't go as far as saying we have specific leads.

"If we can narrow it down to a smaller geographical location and particular farms, that would be great for us."

Fruit sold under Berry Obsession, Berry Licious and Donnybrook brands originating from Queensland have been withdrawn from retailers.

NSW police have warned that fruit sold under the Love Berry, Delightful Strawberries and Oasis brands had needles inserted by a possible copycat.

A fresh report of a contamination in Townsville is being investigated, Queensland police said, following instances elsewhere in the state, as well as Victoria and NSW.

But authorities have stopped short of discouraging consumers from buying strawberries.

Sewing needles and pins have been deliberately placed inside strawberries across the ditch. Source: 1 NEWS