Perth mum who accused kids of hanging daughter from tree with skipping rope handed restraining order

A Perth mother is readying for a court battle, following a much publicised bullying case involving her daughter.

Belinda Yoon's 10-year old daughter Amber was allegedly hung from a tree with a skipping rope, but is now facing a restraining order from the parents of the children accused of doing it.

In an emotional post on social media, Ms Yoon spoke about her frustrations in the apparent protection of her daughter's abusers.

"Apparently I've been driving past their house in an agitated state, for one I had no idea about their first names or even where they lived," a tearful Ms Yoon said.

"I'd love to know how they could cause us even more heartache, when we have already hurt enough.

"Let us heal, let us try and move on from this and I was trying to do that in a really positive way to try and create change for everybody.

"It feels like I'm almost getting bullied myself because they just want me to be silenced and I won't be."

Ms Yoon will appear in the magistrates court next month, saying she will challenge the restraining order.

“She honestly thought she was going to die,” Amber Yoon said through tears of her 10-year-old daughter. Source: Nine


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Scott Morrison says nation must embrace divisive Australia Day, but calls for another day to recognise indigenous Australians

Prime Minister Scott Morrison says the nation must embrace Australia Day "warts and all", but has called for another day to be set aside to recognise indigenous Australians.

Mr Morrison says January 26, 1778 is when "the ships turned up" in Australia.

"We can't pretend that it's some other day that it happened ... we've got to embrace it all, warts and all," he told the Nine Network today.

But Mr Morrison believes there should be a separate day to acknowledge 60,000 years of indigenous history.

"We don't have to pull Australia Day down to actually recognise the achievements of indigenous Australians, the oldest living culture in the world," he told the Seven Network.

"The two can coexist."

The federal government has stripped a NSW council of its right to hold citizenship ceremonies, after it refused to hold them on the national holiday, opting instead for January 25.

Mr Morrison said if council's such as Byron Shire Council want to treat citizenship ceremonies like a "political football", the Commonwealth can easily go elsewhere.

"Citizenship is about the citizens, it's not about the egos of councillors," he said.

Deputy Labor leader Tanya Plibersek said the opposition also supports Australia Day remaining on January 26 and is open to the idea of an additional day to recognise indigenous Australians.

But Labor is disappointed the prime minister has flouted such a "significant idea" through the media without consultation.

"It's disrespectful," she tweeted.

"Unlike Scott Morrison, we'll consult indigenous people and our indigenous caucus about whether a proper day of recognition with an additional public holiday is a positive way forward - we're open to it."

Byron Mayor Simon Richardson has said Australia Day caused pain in a section of the community and questioned whether the values of a fair go and mateship were being reflected.

"Is it true mateship to willingly, willfully and continually to celebrate what rightfully is great to be an Australian on a day that some Australians are pained by?" the Greens mayor told 3AW.

Immigration Minister David Coleman said citizenship ceremonies should be about bringing communities together.

"The council's actions are divisive and the Australian government will not stand by and allow this to happen," he said.

The government last year removed the right to host citizenship ceremonies from Melbourne's City of Yarra and Darebin councils after they voted not to hold them on January 26.

Commonwealth Games hold an indigenous welcome
Source: Te Karere


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Amazing footage of derailed train that fell into US river shows extent of destruction

No injuries have been reported after a train derailed Sunday in northwest Iowa and 20 cars carrying soybean oil and sand fell into the flooded Floyd River.

Drone video from the Sioux County Sheriff's Office showed more than a dozen mangled railcars in the river.

No injuries have been reported after a train derailed on Monday in Iowa, with 20 cars carrying soybean oil and sand falling into a flooded river. Source: Associated Press


Bill Cosby doesn't deserve free pass because of his age, prosecutors say at his sentence hearing

Declaring Bill Cosby doesn't deserve a free pass because of his advanced age, prosecutors today asked a judge to sentence the comedian to five to 10 years in prison for drugging and sexually assaulting a woman, while the defence argued that he is too old and helpless to do time behind bars.

"What does an 81-year-old man do in prison?" defence attorney Joseph Green asked on day one of the sentencing hearing for Cosby, who is legally blind and dependent on others. "How does he fight off the people who are trying to extort him, or walk to the mess hall?"

Green suggested that Cosby instead be put on something akin to house arrest.

The guilty verdict came less than a year after another jury deadlocked on the charges. Source: Breakfast

Montgomery County District Attorney Kevin Steele said that he has no doubt Cosby would commit another such offense if given the opportunity, warning that the TV star seemingly gets a sexual thrill out of slipping women drugs and assaulting them.

"So to say that he's too old to do that - to say that he should get a pass, because it's taken this long to catch up to what he's done?" Steele said, his voice rising. "What they're asking for is a 'get out of jail free' card."

And he said the sentence should send a message to others.

"Despite bullying tactics, despite PR teams and other folks trying to change the optics, as one lawyer for the defence put it, the bottom line is that nobody's above the law. Nobody," the district attorney said.

Judge Steven O'Neill is expected to sentence Cosby on Tuesday. The TV star once known as America's Dad for his starring role in "The Cosby Show" could become the first celebrity of the #MeToo era to be sent to prison.

Cosby was convicted in April of violating former Temple University women's basketball administrator Andrea Constand at his suburban Philadelphia mansion in 2004.

After testifying for several hours at two trials, the first of which ended in a hung jury, Constand spoke in court Monday for just two minutes.

"The jury heard me. Mr. Cosby heard me. Now all I am asking for is justice as the court sees fit," said Constand, who submitted a much longer victim-impact statement that wasn't read in court.

Steele quoted Constand in her statement as saying that Cosby took "my beautiful, healthy, young spirit and crushed it."

The three charges on which Cosby was convicted carry up to 10 years in prison each, but both sides agreed to merge them together for sentencing because they stemmed from the same encounter. State sentencing guidelines call for about one to four years behind bars on the combined charge.

The judge is also expected to decide whether to declare Cosby a "sexually violent predator" - a scarlet letter that would make him subject to mandatory lifetime counselling and community notification of his whereabouts.

On Monday, Kristen Dudley, a psychologist for the state of Pennsylvania, testified that Cosby has an uncontrollable urge to violate young women and would probably commit another such offense if given the chance. A psychologist for Cosby's side is set to testify Tuesday.

Cosby's lawyers argued that the state law on classifying sexual predators is unconstitutional. They contended also that Cosby is unlikely to commit another crime because of his age and health and because there have been no complaints that he molested anyone in the 14 years since his encounter with Constand.

"The suggestion that Mr. Cosby is dangerous is not supported by anything other than the frenzy," Green said, alluding to protesters outside the courthouse and public debate about the case.

Constand's mother, Gianna, also took the stand Monday and attributed her health problems to Cosby-related stress. She accused Cosby of "ruining many lives."

"I can only hope and pray that some sense of peace and faith can be restored back on our family," she said. "The victims cannot be un-raped. Unfortunately, all we can do is hold the perpetrator accountable."

Monday's proceedings took place as another extraordinary #MeToo drama continued to unfold on Capitol Hill, where Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh faces allegations of sexual misconduct from more than three decades ago.

Cosby, looking grim, walked into the courthouse in the morning on the arm of his longtime spokesman as protesters shouted at him. His wife of 54 years, Camille, was not in court.

Cosby spokesman Andrew Wyatt told reporters in the afternoon that the entertainer was in "great, great" spirits.

"We tell him to stay strong and stay focused, and he's focused on Mrs. Cosby, and that's what matters in his family," Wyatt said. "He's a great guy. He's still America's Dad, and they won't ever take that away. You can't take away the legacy."

In the years since Constand first went to police in 2005, more than 60 women have accused Cosby of sexual misconduct, though none of those claims have led to criminal charges. At least two of those women, Lise-Lotte Lublin and former model Janice Dickinson, were among those in the courtroom for the start of the sentencing.

Prosecutors had hoped to have some of the other accusers address the court at sentencing. But the district attorney's office told The Associated Press that that would not happen.

A few hours before the hearing, Constand tweeted Ephesians 4:26, a Bible verse about letting go of anger: "Be wrathful, but do not sin; do not let the sun set while you are still angry; do not give the Devil an opportunity."

Cosby, who grew up in public housing in Philadelphia, became the first black actor to star in a prime-time TV show, "I Spy," in 1965. He remained a Hollywood A-lister for much of the next half-century, hitting his peak in the 1980s with the top-rated "Cosby Show" as the warm, wisecracking dad, Dr. Cliff Huxtable.


The comedian was today found guilty of drugging and sexually assaulting Andrea Constand in 2004.
Source: 1 NEWS


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