Harvey Weinstein to challenge firing from company following sexual assault claims

Harvey Weinstein is reportedly set to challenge his firing from The Weinstein Company.

The 65-year-old film producer was fired by the board of his firm, which he co-founded with his brother Bob Weinstein in 2005, "in light of new information about misconduct" after Harvey was accused of sexually harassing a number of female employees for almost three decades.

The statement issued at the time read: "In light of new information about misconduct by Harvey Weinstein that has emerged in the past few days, the directors of The Weinstein Company - Robert Weinstein, Lance Maerov, Richard Koenigsberg and Tarak Ben Ammar - have determined, and have informed Harvey Weinstein, that his employment with The Weinstein Company is terminated, effective immediately."

It has now been claimed that Harvey will phone in to the board meeting on October 17, where he will speak to the board from the rehab facility he is attending.

His civil lawyer Patty Glaser is said to be planning to be at the meeting in person to make his case.

TMZ report that Harvey did not violate his current contract, which he signed in October 2015, and that he insists that no sexual harassment complaints were made about incidents after he signed the contract.

It is believed the company had every right to fire Harvey immediately but he is able to challenge the decision and ask for mediation and arbitration.

Following the allegations made against Harvey, his wife Georgina Chapman announced she was leaving her husband of 10 years and that her focus would be on her kids, India, seven, and Dashiell, four.

She said in a statement: "My heart breaks for all the women who have suffered tremendous pain because of these unforgivable actions. I have chosen to leave my husband. Caring for my young children is my first priority and I ask the media for privacy at this time."



Melbourne man who murdered girlfriend's baby in 'brutal' attack jailed for 34 years

A Melbourne ice user who murdered his girlfriend's baby boy in a "ferocious, brutal and sickening attack" has been jailed for 34 years, it can now be revealed.

Dwayne Lindsey, 35, killed six-month-old Chayse Dearing at a home in Glenroy in June 2016 and was later found guilty by a jury of murder.

Lindsey was jailed in the Supreme Court in May to 34 years with a non-parole period of 27 years, but this could not be published until today, when a judge lifted a suppression order.

Dwayne Lindsey. Source: Victoria Police.


Flooding begins as Hurricane Florence hits coastal regions of North Carolina

The National Hurricane Center said "catastrophic" freshwater flooding was expected over portions of the Carolinas as Hurricane Florence inches closer to the US East Coast.

Areas of coastal North Carolina began to experience flooding today.

The now Category 1 storm's intensity diminished as it neared land, with winds dropping to 135 kph by nightfall. But that, combined with the storm's slowing forward movement and heavy rains, had Governor Roy Cooper warning of an impending disaster.

As of 2 am EDT (0600 GMT), Florence was centered about 55 kilometres east of Wilmington, North Carolina. Its forward movement increased slightly to 9 kph.

Hurricane-force winds extended 150 kilometres from its centre, and tropical-storm-force winds up to 315 kilometres.

Forecasters said the combination of a life-threatening storm surge and the tide will cause normally dry areas near the coast to be flooded by rising waters moving inland from the shoreline.

The National Hurricane Center said this ‘catastrophic’ freshwater flooding was expected. Source: Associated Press

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'We haven't given up hope' - orca whale declared dead but US feds refuse to stop search

Efforts to find a sick young orca from a critically endangered population of killer whales in the Pacific Northwest came up empty, and a scientist who tracks the animals declared her dead — though federal authorities said they'd keep looking.

The grim news means scientists believe just 74 whales remain in a group that has failed to reproduce successfully in the past three years. The orcas have struggled with pollution, boat noise and, most severely, a dearth of their preferred prey, chinook salmon, because of dams, habitat loss and overfishing.

"We're watching a population marching toward extinction," said Ken Balcomb of the Center for Whale Research. "Unless we do something about salmon recovery, we're just not going to have these whales in the future."

The whales are in such bad shape that experts prepared last-ditch efforts to save the emaciated nearly 4-year-old known as J50. A sharpshooting veterinarian fired an antibiotic-filled dart into her, crews dropped live salmon in front of her to try to get her to eat, and scientists even mulled capturing her so they could diagnose and treat her.

J50 has not been seen since last Friday. As teams scrambled to find her today, she failed to appear with her pod once again, despite favorable sighting conditions. Balcomb, who tracks the whales for the US government, declared her dead late this afternoon.

Michael Milstein, a spokesman for NOAA Fisheries, said the agency gives great weight to Balcomb's assessment of the whales, given his long experience monitoring them. But, he said the US and Canadian governments plan to continue searching Friday on the chance she's still alive.

"We want to make the most of it to make sure that if J50 is there, we haven't missed her," Milstein said. "We haven't given up hope."

Crews in a US Coast Guard helicopter, 10 vessels, whale watch crews and other resources on both sides of the border were involved in the search. Authorities also alerted a network of people who respond when marine mammals wash ashore.

Whale experts feared the orca was dead earlier this month when J50 lagged behind her family and went missing. But she later turned up and was seen with her family.

The distinctive black-and-white orcas, known as southern resident killer whales, have struggled since they were listed as an endangered species in the US and Canada well over a decade ago.

The orcas' numbers are now at their lowest in more than three decades.

Another whale in the same pod, known as J35, triggered international sympathy this summer when she kept the body of her dead calf afloat in waters for more than two weeks.

The message, the Center for Whale Research said in a website post, is that extinction is looming "while the humans convene task forces and conference calls that result in nothing, or worse than nothing, diverting attention and resources from solving the underlying ecological problems."

Scientist began to be concerned about J50 in July. Teams dropped live salmon from a boat as J50 and her pod swam behind — a test to see whether fish could be used as a means of delivering medication.

Drone images taken earlier this month showed J50 much thinner than she was last year. Her mother, J16, has also declined in condition in the past month.

Orca whale
Orca whale. Source: Getty


NSW woman who killed new boyfriend with carving knife on suspicion he killed her cat jailed for 12 years

A NSW woman who suspected her new boyfriend had killed her cat has been jailed for at least 12 years for fatally stabbing him in the back with a large carving knife.

Rachel Impson, 42, was found guilty in April of murdering Michael "Mick" Insley one night in October 2014 on an isolated and dark island in the Lake Illawarra region, after he turned up outside her tent, uninvited and without notice.

In jailing her in the NSW Supreme Court today, Justice Michael Walton found there had been "a degree of provocation" by Mr Insley towards Impson, who was in a "heightened emotional state", not only due to the death of her cat Angel but also because of her mental health disorders.

Knife.