TODAY |

Hacker infiltrates India call centre trying to con computer users out of money

A British man has hacked into a call centre in India designed to get people in the United Kingdom to pay up after falsely claiming their computer's security has been breached.

One example of a scam is a fake pop up is sent to computer users telling them to call a Microsoft helpline.

Victims are charged hundreds of pounds by the fraudsters to who say they'll fix a problem, that wasn’t there in the first place.

The hacker, who goes by the name "Jim Browning", shared his findings with the BBC after hacking into the company's scam phone calls as well as CCTV footage, capturing them in the act.

While the act is illegal, Browning says he wants to help by exposing the criminal scamming operations happening overseas. 

The call centre run by Amit Chauhan is said to be raking in over $100,000 each month but when approached by the BBC he refused to comment about his business.

Dave Matika had been target by scammers who used threats of child pornography, forcing him to buy into their fake firewall protection.

“I had to buy the firewall, some sort of firewall, just to save my computer and save my name really,” Mr Matika told the BBC.

Delhi Police officer Sameer Sharmer says catching these scam operations is extremely difficult based on the lack of information available. 

"This crime is a difficult crime, it's difficult to crack because we don't have victims. We don't have the accused; we don't have anything." 

He says while they are trying to crack down on scamming operations, it's harder to solve these crimes as often the victims are based overseas.

The United Kingdom alone receives 21 million scam calls every month.