Donald Trump and his foundation being sued by New York for 'illegal conduct' including support of his 2016 presidential campaign

US President Donald Trump and his namesake foundation have been sued by the New York State Attorney General Barbara Underwood, with the president attacking "the sleazy New York Democrats" in response and vowing not to settle.

Underwood says the non-profit organisation should be dissolved after supporting Trump's 2016 US presidential campaign and more than 10 years of illegal conduct.

ONN 1 News at 6 promo image
For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6pm. Source: 1 NEWS

She accused the foundation's directors of "extensive unlawful political coordination" with the Trump campaign, and "repeated and wilful self-dealing" to benefit the personal and business interests of the president.

Following the accusations, Trump attacked "the sleazy New York Democrats" on Twitter.

"The sleazy New York Democrats, and their now disgraced (and run out of town) A.G. Eric Schneiderman, are doing everything they can to sue me on a foundation that took in $18,800,000 and gave out to charity more money than it took in, $19,200,000. I won't settle this case!" he wrote.

Trump's children were also named as defendants in the petition, which was filed in the New York State Supreme Court.

New York is seeking a 10-year ban on Trump serving as a director of a New York non-profit, and one-year bans for his children Donald Jr, Eric and Ivanka as well as NZ$4.1 million ($US2.8 million) of restitution plus penalties. 

FILE - In this July 23, 2014 file photo, Donald Trump, right, sits with his children, from left, Eric Trump, Donald Trump Jr., and Ivanka Trump during a ground breaking ceremony for the Trump International Hotel in Washington. New York's attorney general filed a lawsuit Thursday, June 14, 2018 accusing  Trump of illegally using money from his charitable foundation to settle disputes involving his business empire and to burnish his image during his run for the White House. The president blasted the case as politically motivated. The lawsuit seeks $2.8 million in restitution and the dissolution of the foundation. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)
Donald Trump and his children, Ivanka Trump (centre) and Donald Trump Jr (left) were named defendants in the petition. Source: Associated Press



'Individual stories' from London's deadly Grenfell Tower fire 'bring me to tears' - Joy Reid

I remember watching the pictures of Grenfell Tower burning and going to sleep (in NZ) thinking, "surely they'll get everyone out - I mean this is London right?"

I woke up the next day and to my horror I saw Emma Keeling, the Europe Correspondent at the time still reporting and by that stage, it was clear not everyone had survived.

I felt sick.

Then we saw the horrific pictures of family members putting up photos, frantically visiting hospitals and trying to find some trace of their loved one.

It was a day of reflection, but there are still many unanswered questions remaining. Source: 1 NEWS

Seventy-two perished, each one leaving behind a heartbroken family. The individual stories bring me to tears!

In June 2017, 70 people died when the residential tower caught on fire. Source: Breakfast

Three generations of families who died, the firefighter who had to choose between saving a mother and her baby or a five-year-old child, the mother whose baby died in her arms as she descended the smoke-filled stairs, the husband who lost hold of his wife's hand in the hallway and never saw her again and the father who was away in Egypt and rushed back, buying chocolates in duty free for his daughters only to find they’d died.

There are 72 of these horrific stories and as a human you can't help but stare at Grenfell Tower - a tomb now wrapped in plastic - and wonder how this could possibly have happened.

What's emerged over the 365 days has been one outrage to the next.

An inquiry has heard of the safety failures which allowed the fire to burn out of control, the non-compliant combustible cladding, the substandard fire doors, the lack of fire safety systems, the mixed advice which meant people stayed in their homes instead of evacuating.

Then to add insult to injury, the survivors have been let down by authorities. A year on, more than half of those displaced still don’t have a permanent home. Some families are still living in kitchen-less hotel rooms.

An inquiry has started which the bereaved and the survivors hope will bring much-needed answers.  The police are still investigating possible criminal action and the fight for truth and justice is ongoing. 

The pain is still so raw. You could see it on the faces of those marking the anniversary at the base of the tower today. Tears flowed freely. People travelled hours to be there, such is the level of heartache throughout the country, not just in North Kensington.

The latest estimate is that 11,000 people are suffering some kind of post-traumatic stress, prompting the largest mental health response of its kind in Europe.

And could it happen again?  The UK has an estimated two billion dollar bill to fix more than 300 buildings which are at risk, although the combustible cladding has not yet been banned.

The fall out continues and as anniversaries often do, the raw emotion has today resurfaced.

It feels a lot like the emotion felt on the first anniversary of the Christchurch earthquake where there was so much grief mixed with so many unanswered questions about why buildings had failed so catastrophically.

They say time heals. I hope that's true. The bereaved and the survivors need peace and those that died need to rest in peace. But with so many unanswered questions it feels like that peace is still a fair way off.

A picture of Grenfell Tower on the first anniversary of the deadly fire. Source: 1 NEWS

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

Watch: Stunning collection of Frida Kahlo's personal artefacts goes on show in London

A stunning collection of acclaimed artist Frida Kahlo's personal artefacts will go on show in London more than 60 years after her death.

The show will feature tens of thousands of objects, including dresses, jewellery and medical equipment used by the artist after a near-fatal bus accident left her with life-long injuries in her teens.

The treasure trove of items was discovered when the bathroom of her home - left untouched for 50 years after her death - was opened in 2004.

The Mexican icon was known for her vivid self-portraits, which often reflected a life filled with tragedy and ill health.