Demonstrators mock US President with giant blimp depicting Trump as baby

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Associated Press

Demonstrators are mocking US President Donald Trump with a giant balloon depicting him as a screaming orange baby today as tens of thousands march through the streets of London to protest the American leader's visit to the UK.

Thousands are marching through the streets of London to protest US President Donald Trump's visit to the UK.
Source: 1 NEWS

The diaper-clad infant, with a quiff of hair and a mobile phone for tweeting, is soaring over the Houses of Parliament, the centerpiece of demonstrations protesting Trump's policies on issues ranging from immigration and race relations to women and climate change.

"This was just a bunch of friends who got together in a pub," said Kevin Smith, one of the 16 people behind the balloon.

"This is what people need to be doing — to come together in their communities to organize and work out how to stand against right wing populism and xenophobia that we're seeing not just in the US but in Europe."

Anger over Trump's visit has already had consequences.

Just a week after Trump's inauguration, Prime Minister Theresa May invited the president for a state visit, the type of event that normally includes glittering horse-drawn carriages and a state dinner hosted by the monarch.

That morphed into this two-day "working visit" with much less pomp and circumstance amid concern about security and crowds in central London.

Protest organisers say they plan to stage demonstrations in some 50 cities around the UK.

"We hope that wherever Donald Trump goes, he hears and sees the strength of a British opinion that rejects not just him as a person and however distasteful he is as a person, but the policies and politics that he represents," said Asad Rehman, organiser of UK Protests Against Trump's Visit.

Trump will spend very little time in London, having stayed in the capital for a single, well-insulated night at the official residence of the US ambassador in Regent's Park.

After arriving in Britain yesterday afternoon, Trump had dinner at Winston Churchill's birthplace, Blenheim Palace, about 100 kilometres outside London.

Tomorrow, he will travel to the prime minister's country residence, Chequers, for talks with May.

Instead of a procession down The Mall to Buckingham Palace, he'll be helicoptered to the garden at Windsor Castle for tea with Queen Elizabeth II.

Trump, in an interview with Britain's Sun newspaper, criticised London Mayor Sadiq Khan, saying he had not been "hospitable" to the US government. Khan refused to block the Trump baby balloon.

"I guess when they put out blimps to make me feel unwelcome, no reason for me to go to London," Trump said in an interview published today.

Khan, who has often been a target of Trump's ire, backed the protests but said those who want to cause trouble are not welcome.

"The US has always stood by our side as a beacon for tolerance, openness and respect. This protest is not anti-American - far from it. Most of those marching on Friday will love the United States, just as I do," Khan said.

"But having a special relationship means that we expect the highest standards from each other, and it also means speaking out when we think the values we hold dear are under threat."

The National Police Chiefs Council, which is responsible for the deployment of police during large-scale events, said demand is "particularly high" this week as forces work together to provide security and police the protests.

Rest days for officers have been cancelled and many will be working 12-hour shifts.

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