British PM already discussing future trade ties with NZ, Australia and India

British Prime Minister Theresa May says Britain has already started discussions on future trade ties with New Zealand, Australia and India, following last year's vote to leave the European Union.

As well as seeking to pursue "a bold and ambitious" free trade agreement with the EU, May told an audience at the World Economic Forum on Thursday that Britain is looking to strike trade deals with "old friends" and "new allies."

She said tentative discussions have already begun with Australia, India and New Zealand and that China, Brazil, and the Persian Gulf states have expressed their interest in striking trade deals.

"It is about embracing genuine free trade, because that is the basis of our prosperity but also the best way to cement the multilateral partnerships and cooperation that help to build a better world," she said.

"I want the UK to emerge from this period of change as a truly global Britain — the best friend and neighbour to our European partners, but a country that reaches beyond the borders of Europe, too."

She said governments have to also take account of those left behind by globalisation, saying "mainstream political and business leaders have failed to comprehend their legitimate concerns for too long."

She urged businesses to play by the same rules as everyone else, especially on paying taxes.

Otherwise, she said, political parties of the far left and far right will keep exploiting this discontent.

"If we are to make the case for free markets, free trade and globalisation, as we must, those of us who believe in them must face up to and respond to the concerns people have," May said.

May's speech comes two days after she outlined her strategy for the Brexit discussions with the EU that will start after she formally triggers the two-year exit discussions.

That is expected by the end of March.



Vice Chancellor Jan Thomas misled students, says Massey University Students' Association president

Massey University Vice Chancellor Jan Thomas misled students over the cancellation of the Don Brash speaking event and the student association has no confidence in her ability to do the job.

Student association president Ngahuia Kirton says her biggest concern to come out of the issue was threats to restrict funding to the association.

"As a whole, students seem to have been misled and I don’t think that their views were properly taken into consideration by the senior leadership team," she told TVNZ1’s Breakfast.

"MUSA’s position is very clear, we have no confidence in the vice chancellor’s ability to discharge her duties, so I would hope that the university council would take that into consideration," she said.

Documents obtained yesterday under the Official Information Act contain correspondence to and from Ms Thomas in the run-up to the cancellation.

In one email on 9 July, the vice-chancellor said she did not want a "te tiriti led university to be seen to be endorsing racist behaviours".

A day later, she emailed to say she would like to know the options for banning the politics club from holding events on campus.

She said the "racist behaviour of Dr Brash - given te reo is an official language of NZ and we are a tiriti-led university - can't be ignored".

Ms Kirton said the vice chancellor’s concerns that Mr Brash’s views didn’t align with the values of the university were valid but students were still misled.

"I think her concerns were more around the fact that Massey University is a teriti-led and her views that Don Brash’s views didn’t align with that is completely valid."

"I’m more concerned about the way she handled the communication and the events that happened afterwards."

"Personally, I don’t agree with Don Brash’s views, and I think many people at the student association also do not agree with them, however I do think university as the critic and conscience of society is a great place to have those healthy debates and these difficult conversations."

Ms Kirton says her biggest concern to come out of the issue was threats to restrict funding to the association.

"The cancellation of the Don Brash events aside, the student association’s biggest concern is actually the threats to restrict funding to student associations to manage backlash."

President Ngahuia Kirton says the student association has no confidence in Jan Thomas’s ability to perform her duties. Source: Breakfast

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Aussie grandfather cheats death after giant metal rod smashes through windscreen

An Australian grandfather cheated death when a giant metal rod fell from a construction truck and plunged into his windscreen.

Joe Sant was driving when a truck, which was travelling in the opposite direction in Sydney’s Peakhurst, lost its load.

The rod smashed his windscreen, but thankfully narrowly missed him.

‘I just go a bit of glass in my eye, that’s all,” he told Nine News.

He went to hospital as a precaution.

Sydney’s Joe Sant was surprised when the metal rod fell froma construction truck and flew through his windscreen. Source: Breakfast


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Inquiry to look at how NSW police investigated dozens of gay hate killings

The way NSW Police investigated gay hate crimes, which drove men over cliffs to their deaths or saw them brutally bashed in their homes or city parks, will be examined by a state parliamentary inquiry.

The inquiry to be conducted by the NSW Social Issues Committee, will investigate how NSW Police handled gay hate crimes and why the state's justice system may not have protected LGBTQI people or delayed justice for them and their families.

The committee will investigate the almost 90 gay murders between 1970 and 2010 and also call for public submissions from victims and their families.

A police investigation of 88 suspicious deaths of gay men between 1976 to 2000 found 27 of them were likely murdered simply for being gay.

Committee chair Shayne Mallard said the inquiry would look at gay hate crimes perpetrated against the LGBTIQ community and review current policies to identify shortcomings.

Australia police Source: 1 NEWS


Mother of Spanish golfer slain in US talks about her daughter's special shine

The parents of slain top amateur Spanish golfer Celia Barquin Arozamena spoke about their daughter on Wednesday, saying she had a "special shine."

Her mother Miriam Arozamena spoke near their family home in the northern Spanish village of Puente San Miguel.

Looking distraught, the mother told reporters that she used to speak with her daughter every day and that she was an intelligent, studious and organised person.

The golfer was finishing her degree at Iowa State University when she was killed.

Collin Daniel Richards, a former inmate from small-town Iowa with a history of violence, was charged with stabbing Barquin Arozamena to death during a random attack while she was golfing by herself in broad daylight on Monday morning.

Celia Barquin Arozamena was playing a round in central Iowa when she was allegedly attacked by Collin Daniel Richards. Source: Associated Press