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'I want to be one of the people that lead our sport' - Kiwi Paralympian has eyes set on redefining javelin in Rio

At just 21, Holly Robinson is one of our top para-athletes and is still yet to reach her peak.

She's one of our medal hopefuls at this month's Paralympic Games in the javelin event.

"She's only 35cm short of the world record and realistically that is our goal – we want to win and take the world record this season," coach Raylene Bates said.

"But she's only 21 and at the end of the day, the average age of an international athlete is between 28-32 so realistically she's got at least another two games ahead of her should she wish to chase that dream."

"I want to be one of the people that lead our sport"

While Croatia's Sara Koluk cleared 66 metres to win gold at last month's Olympic games in Rio, para-athletes are throwing twenty metres less.

"We're throwing around 40 metres, so that's a 20 metre deficit," said Robinson.

"And I want to be one of the people that lead our sport in a movement towards throwing further than what we are now come, would be cool to bridge that gap a little."

That's because the balance of the technique is a little bit different – Holly was born without her lower left arm.

"An able-bodied thrower would really use that left arm and use that left side – it's worth at least 30 maybe even 40 percent of the throw," said Bates.

"But Holly's learning with the aid of a prosthetic and we’ve spent a lot of work in the last four years balancing her body."

This year's Games aren't Holly's first - she placed seventh at London in 2012.

"I'm lucky that I do have that London experience - that's going to be huge going into Rio. I know what to expect, what village life is like and I've come off a really good season."

So what is Holly's goal?

"My goal is 42 metres, if I reach that it'll definitely be medal potential," she said.

"It's a tough field though - the top four girls are all very, very close - anything can happen on the day - and it will it will be tight for the medals."

"I want to be one of the people that lead our sport in a movement towards throwing farther than what we are now," Holly Robinson says. Source: Breakfast