Peter Burling, Blair Tuke among sailors departing Auckland for Volvo Ocean Race's fiercest leg

The start of the latest Volvo Ocean Race stage was an aggressive affair as the seven yachts set sail from Auckland to Brazil.

A brisk wind accompanied the seven boats out of Waitemata Harbour for the seventh and toughest leg of the race which traverses the Southern Ocean.

Despite the length of the 7600 nautical mile (14,000km) journey, the boats were combative in the pre-start, with race leader Mapfre the first across the line.

In 20 knots of breeze and accompanied by a sizeable fleet of spectator boats, they set sail for Itajai, a stage expected to take between three and four weeks.

With double points on offer and a bonus point for rounding Cape Horn first, it is among the most influential of the 11-stage race.

Among the departees was a fully-repaired Vestas 11th Hour Racing, which missed the sixth leg from Hong Kong to Auckland after colliding late in leg five and requiring extensive repairs.

The collision killed a Hong Kong fisherman and injured nine others.

It is three weeks since the other six boats arrived in Auckland, when Dutch entry Team AkzoNobel pipped Hong Kong rival SHK Scallywag by just two minutes.

Volvo Ocean Race standings:

MAPFRE 39, Dongfeng Race Team 34, SHK Scallywag 26, Team AkzoNobel 23, Vestas 11th Hour Racing 23, Team Brunel 20, Turn the Tide on Plastic 12.

Peter Burling and Blair Tuke were amongst those fare-welling family today. Source: 1 NEWS



Man dies after becoming trapped under vehicle while pushing it down driveway in Auckland

A person has died after becoming trapped under a vehicle in Highland Park, East Auckland.

Police confirmed that emergency services were required to attend an incident that occurred on private property at around 12:15pm today.

Initial reports suggest the man was pushing a vehicle down a driveway when he somehow became trapped underneath it.

His next-of-kin have been notified and the death will be referred to the Coroner.

Ambulance Source: 1 NEWS

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The South Auckland teacher inspiring his students to follow their musical passion

For students of Auckland's Manurewa High School, the impact and influence of music teacher Tim Randle has left a lasting impression on hundreds, if not thousands of pupils.

Having been a teacher at the school for 15 years, Mr Randle has inspired his students to follow their musical passions, with his most recent group, named Mit Eldnar - Tim Randle spelled backwards - competing in the final of both the Smokefree Tangata Beats and Smokefree Rockquest competitions.

"I'm so proud, I'm the gushing father or uncle, I think it's pretty obvious heart-on-sleeve stuff from me," Mr Randle told TVNZ1's Seven Sharp.

Being at Manurewa High for so long, Mr Randle has seen a number of triumphs from his bands, although the long serving music teacher is quick to pass on any praise.

"I want to say lucky, but that's not the right word, we have wonderful kids. Ridiculous, phenomenal kids."

The feeling is certainly mutual.

"He's amazing, he doesn't get enough credit, so humble about helping all of us," student Makayla Eli says.

Mr Randle's influence has even rubbed off on his students, with Mit Eldnar frontman Sonatane Kaufusi deciding to follow in his teacher's footsteps.

However, Mr Randle says that everything he is, is all thanks to his students.

"If I am humble I probably get that off the kids." 

This weekend Tim Randle’s latest Manurewa High School group will compete at Tangata Beats and the Smokefreerockquest. Source: Seven Sharp

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Auckland lawyer sentenced for helping human trafficker

They were promised high wages, free food and accommodation, but instead they were paid just a fraction of what they were promised and forced to live in squalid, cramped conditions.

Today, the lawyer who helped a human trafficker fool Immigration New Zealand was sentenced to 10 months home detention with six months post release conditions and $1575 in reparations to the workers.

In 2014, Mohammed Idris Hanif provided legal services to Faroz Ali, who was found guilty of human trafficking in 2016 - the first conviction of its kind in New Zealand.

Hanif gave false and misleading visitor visa applications on behalf of the Fijian workers, so that the workers Ali had trafficked into New Zealand could continue working in his gib-fixing business.

Hanif provided applications on five separate occasions that stated the Fijian workers were genuine tourists, who were in New Zealand to sight-see and visit friends and family, which was false.

Hanif was used to appearing at the lawyers' benches of Manukau District Court but today he was in the dock.

He maintains his innocence and applied for a discharge without conviction, saying the charges were trivial.

The application was opposed by Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment lawyer Shona Carr said Hanif provided false information to authorities on who and who should not be allowed in New Zealand.

She said the vicitms of the offending - poor workers from Fiji - had spent so much on getting to New Zealand that they could not pull out of the scam because they had to try and recover the money they had borrowed from friends and relatives.

"The victims were embarrassed and ashamed and left unable to repay their debt."

She said it would not be appropriate to give Hanif a discharge without conviction when he maintained his innocence.

Judge Gregory Hikaka said the matter was serious as it involved misleading Government officials who relied on lawyers to be honest.

The judge said the workers spent their time in New Zealand in squalid conditions and returned to Fiji in debt to friends and family.

Hanif has been a lawyer since 1987 but now his practising certificate has expired but the Law Society are aware of the charges and he still faces disciplinary action.

He's also been ordered to pay $1575 dollars in reparation to the workers.

Ali, the man who promised the migrants everything, only to exploit them was found guilty of bringing in vulnerable Fijian workers and exploiting them in 2016.

Justice Heath sentenced Ali to nine-and-a-half years in prison for 57 charges, including people trafficking, which he described as an "abhorrent" crime.

Ali headed an organisation that ran advertisements in a Fijian newspaper, promising people orchard and construction work in New Zealand at seven or eight times their pay.

They were charged exorbitant fees to travel to New Zealand, but when they arrived they were forced to sleep on the floor and had rent and food costs deducted from their pay.

Suliana Vetanivula was one of the workers, and her victim impact statement was read by Crown prosecutor Luke Clancy at Ali's sentencing.

"When I go out I feel ashamed to see the people I owe in my village. When I came to them for help, they were ready to help me and in return I didn't do my part. When I returned to the village I felt like I was not wanted anymore, like everybody sees me as a failure.

"It was like I stole money from them because they know that whoever goes to Australia or New Zealand for work, they come back with a lot of money."

Mr Clancy said Ali had expressed no remorse whatsoever and owed the workers $128,000 in fees and outstanding wages. He said that figure did not include the profit Ali made from their labour.

Ali's lawyer, Peter Broad, said his client had no other money available and was facing bankruptcy after being pursued by the Inland Revenue Department for a $126,000 tax bill.

Justice Heath said some of the workers were sent to the Bay of Plenty for orchard work, where the accommodation was shamefully poor.

"Three married women and one married man were taken to a house near Pyes Pa and told they would be staying in the basement with other people. There was no bedding to speak of and only one mattress was available. This in July 2014, in the midst of a New Zealand winter. That must have been extremely cold for people travelling from the tropical warmth of Fiji."

In sentencing Ali, the judge ordered him to pay reparation of $28,000 to refund the fees the workers paid.

"People trafficking is an abhorrent crime. It is a crime against human dignity. It undermines the respect that all of us should have for the human rights and the autonomy of individual people. Such conduct degrades human life. It is a crime that should be condemned in the strongest possible terms."

By Edward Gay

rnz.co.nz

Mohammed Idris Hanif
Mohammed Idris Hanif Source: rnz.co.nz


Granddaughter following in sporting footsteps of New Zealand's oldest living Olympian

Our oldest living Olympian is adding to her list of proud moments, with her granddaughter following in her sporting success.

Ngaire Galloway (nee Lane) is getting ready to watch 17-year-old Gina Galloway compete at next month's 2018 Summer Youth Olympic Games in Buenos Aires.

Described as a "a powerful and stylish swimmer", Galloway was New Zealand’s first female swimmer to hold concurrent junior, intermediate and senior national records.

She was also the only swimmer and female in the New Zealand team to compete at the 1948 London Games.

Seventy years on, granddaughter Gina is showing the same form. Last year she won a bronze medal at the Commonwealth Youth Games in The Bahamas.

Gina visited her Nana in Nelson today for a final "goodluck" before her next big event.

The pair not only share the swimming gene, they are both backstroke specialists too.

"From a young age, listening to all her stories, of her travels, the friends she's made and the experiences she's gained from swimming has been really really inspiring," Gina told 1 NEWS.

Both agree the technique has changed , but the goal - to be the fastest- remains the same.

"Three years ago I was still swimming 30 lengths, but I struck some back trouble," says Ngaire.

At 92, she’s enjoying being a spectator.

"She's able to livestream into the races I'm doing and Dad always sends her the links so she can watch. It's always cool knowing she's watching from Nelson," says Gina.

Now Ngaire hopes to catch Gina's medal moment in Argentina.

"I'd probably just about collapse with excitement."

"You better be careful," she tells her granddaughter.

Ngaire Lane, 92, is getting ready to watch her granddaughter compete at the Youth Olympics. Source: 1 NEWS