Kiwi drivers Scott McLaughlin and Fabian Coulthard eyeing up big performances in Melbourne

For the first time the supercars are racing for points at the Australian GP circuit in Melbourne. Source: 1 NEWS



Kiwi motocross ace Courtney Duncan hoping third time's a charm after twice missing maiden world series crown

Kiwi Motocross rider Courtney Duncan is hoping third times a charm, as she looks to win her maiden world series crown.

Duncan's first two campaigns have seen her fall agonisingly short of a title, with two crashes in the final rounds pushing her off top spot on the podium.

When asked on what's changed since her debut, Duncan says she's learnt a lot.

"I'm no longer a rookie, so I can't make those rookie mistakes," said Duncan.

She's also had to overcome off-season ACL surgery on her right knee, the fourth time she's had such surgery, despite only being 22.

"The knee's pretty good, obviously good enough to be back on the bike, but obviously the rehab never stops."

Duncan flies out to Belgium tonight, before her first race in Italy in April.

After twice missing out on world titles in dramatic fashion, Courtney Duncan's overcome a few mental barriers, and a string of injuries, to ride again. Source: 1 NEWS

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Winter Olympics Blog: I got to witness NZ sporting history twice in two hours, and I have two nerves-defying 16-year-olds to thank for it

Nico Porteous spewed three times in the training session ahead of the free skiing halfpipe finals.

He couldn't eat breakfast. This is all understandable.

After all, at 16-years-old, Porteous was about to go out and compete in the biggest event of his life against some of the biggest names in his sport.

So he didn't eat, and he vomited from the nerves - but then the Wanaka teenager went out and put down two personal best runs to secure an Olympic bronze medal.

The 16-year-old couldn’t stop smiling after his third placing at the Winter Olympics in South Korea. Source: 1 NEWS

Maybe it was helped by the good news he'd heard just beforehand.

Another 16-year-old from Wanaka, Zoi Sadowski-Synnott, had broken a 26-year-long drought.

She had claimed bronze in the big air snowboarding competition, in large part thanks to a high-flying trick that scored a mammoth 92 points.

Zoi's parents Sean Synnott and Robyn Sadowski were on hand to witness the 16-year-old leap into history. Source: Seven Sharp

Her mum cried watching on. So did her dad.

He told me later he doesn't know how she manages to do it – get up, train, be an excellent student heading into her final year of high school, and on top of it all be a history-making Winter Olympics medallist.

Sadowski-Synnott, 16, said she couldn't believe she was standing next to some of her snowboarding idols on the podium in PyeongChang. Source: 1 NEWS

Her parents joke that getting out of dishes duty (much to the chagrin of her siblings) may help.

Two teenagers, separated by all of 262 days. Two bronze medals, won in two hours, after a 26 year long wait.

And it wasn’t just the weight of history, but the weight of pressure that the New Zealand team faced as well.

They were talked up as the most promising team in years, the biggest ever sent to a Winter Olympics. They'd targeted a solitary medal, and they were empty handed with just four days of competition left.

Nico Porteous and Zoi Sadowski-Synnott, both 16, did the country proud, says the 1 NEWS reporter. Source: Breakfast

There were brave fourths and fifths – particularly from the speed skaters, who only hours before had come a fraction of a second away from a colossal, medal-winning upset.

Then, on a remarkable Thursday, two teenagers faced down history and pressure and expectation and emerged with medals, adding their names to Kiwi sporting history books that've only ever featured the name Annelise Coberger.

It's an unforgettable feeling to know you've watched history being made, and an incredible privilege to have a small role in sharing the stories of people who created it.

I have a couple of 16-year-olds to thank for that.