'We are evolving the art of paying it forward' - family going without the supermarket says community is crucial

Our new columnist Lydia Harvey says giving up grocery shopping for the year has been made easier by the community surrounding her family. 

How does she do it? That's the question I have been asked many times since we began this journey from living off the supermarket shelves to the backyard garden.

People keep asking me how can this be possible?

Well, firstly, remove all assumptions that we are doing this solo.

Yes, we have converted our backyard to a sustainable garden on our own, yes we raise and look after our own chickens which supply us with eggs, and yes, 90 per cent of what we make we create on our own from scratch.

Source: 1 NEWS

But we are also lucky enough to live in a community of growers, bottlers, seed savers and craftspeople who help make this all possible.

Together as a community we are evolving the art of paying it forward.

On our own, we cannot meet every single need we have, but collectively we are not only meeting our needs but the needs of those around us with surplus produce from our garden.

Source: 1 NEWS

To put meat on the table a couple of nights a week we have exchanged eggs and veggies we don’t need for protein given to us by our neighbours who hunt.

Generous neighbours have given us their excess staples such as sugar, flour and pasta as a thank you for vegetables we have given them or for helping out with their gardens.

The household items which people frequently ask how we source without going to the supermarket is cleaning products and that much-needed item toilet paper.

We currently have a stash of toilet paper which has been given to us, but the plan for when we run out is to buy the eco-friendly toilet paper 'smartass' online.

Source: 1 NEWS

We use warm water and eucalyptus oil to make our own cleaning products, while we use a home-made recipe to make our own laundry powder.

Yes, we still use a few basic items that come our way every now and then from the community, but we've learnt to make do without when we don't have them and enjoy them when we do.

Source: 1 NEWS

We have removed our dependency from store brought items to more ethically and locally produced ones.

From Lydia’s Garden: Garden pizza

Everyone love pizza night! And Lydia has the perfect guilt-free homemade pizza for those cooler autumn nights.

Pizza base
1 ½ cups of self-rising flour (Gluten Free or standard)
1 cup of natural yoghurt
Blend the flour and yoghurt together and roll out on an oven tray.
Topping
Relish
Tomatoes
Red onions
Basil
Mozzarella
Plum source

Spread a relish of your choice (I like to use a home-made courgette relish) and spread onto the base.

Then layer on the finely sliced tomatoes, finely sliced red onions, fresh basil, mozzarella and plum sauce on the pizza base

Bake the pizza for approximately 15 minutes or until base is firm. Set the pizza out of the oven for 10 minutes before serving.

Serve with home-made wedges topped with natural yoghurt and avocado.

Lydia Harvey and her family are trying to do what seems utterly impossible – live off their backyard for one whole year. Source: 1 NEWS



Question Time live: Simon Bridges to press Jacinda Ardern, after Government announces increase to refugee quota

Tune in live as National look to heap more pressure on the Government over the chief technology officer role. Source: 1 NEWS

Winston Peters explains party's support for raising refugee quota

Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters says NZ First shared the Labour Party's "aspiration" to increase the refugee quota, as Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced it will be raised to 1500 today.

The NZ First Party leader's position was in stark contrast to comments made at the start of the month at the Pacific Islands Forum in Nauru.

"We never made a commitment to double the refugee quota," Mr Peters told media at the time.

The Deputy PM went on to argue there were other priorities for the Government.

"We've got 50,000 people who are homeless back home, and I can show you parts of the Hokianga and elsewhere, parts of Northland, with people living in degradation.

"We have to fix their lives up as well before we start taking on new obligations of the level that some people would like."

However, while standing next to Ms Ardern during the announcement today he took a much softer line on the refugee issue.

"This is about people not about politics and controversy, the fact is it was put to me in Nauru that the 1500 figure was already there, which it wasn't.

"The Labour Party policy I knew was an aspiration towards that, so was New Zealand First's an aspiration towards that, and I knew the Greens had a higher target," Mr Peters said.

"All I did was put out the plain facts and to say that it was a work in progress and I'm not surprised with the speed at which the progress has taken place.

"This was always on the cards that we'd get it done when we had all the background work done on refugee centres and a host of other things," he continued.

PM Jacinda Ardern made the announcement today. Source: 1 NEWS

New Zealand's refugee quota was previously 1000, after being increased by the National-led Government from 750 in 2016.

The new quota will take effect from July 2020. 

Major points

- There will be six new settlement locations, on top of re-establishing Christchurch as a settlement location.

- Expanding the public housing supply for 150 extra refugee families is expected to cost $32.5 million over three years.

- Budget 2018 included money to build new accommodation blocks at the Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre  

The NZ First leader said the increase was “always on the cards”. Source: 1 NEWS

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

New Zealand's refugee quota jumps to 1500 per year from July 2020, Government announces

New Zealand’s refugee quota will be raised to 1500, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced today. 

It was previously 1000, after being increased by the National-led Government from 750 in 2016.

"It is the right thing to do," said Ms Ardern. 

"It puts New Zealand much more in line with the humanitarian policies of other developed countries."

Deputy PM Winston Peters said the increase was "about people, not about politics and controversy". 

The NZ First leader said the increase was “always on the cards”. Source: 1 NEWS

The new quota will take effect from July 2020. 

Major points

- There will be six new settlement locations, on top of re-establishing Christchurch as a settlement location.

- Expanding the public housing supply for 150 extra refugee families is expected to cost $32.5 million over three years. 

- Budget 2018 included money to build new accommodation blocks at the Mangere Refugee Resettlement Centre 

ONN 1 News at 6 promo image
For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6pm. Source: 1 NEWS

Background

Yesterday, Ms Ardern told media she wanted to see the current quota increased but a sticking point has been the vastly different policy positions of Labour's Government partners. 

Labour pledged to raise the quota to 1500 and the Green Party aimed for a quota of 5000.

Earlier this month NZ First's Winston Peters told media in Nauru that the focus needed to be on New Zealanders struggling at home.

"We have 50,000 people who are homeless back home and I can show you parts of Northland where people are living in degradation," Mr Peters said, while being questioned at the Pacific Islands' Forum.

National's Simon Bridges said yesterday if the refugee quota was lower than 1500 it would be a demonstration of "Winston Peters undermining the Prime Minister".

"If you look at the Prime Minister's rhetoric she's made great play about being a globalist, a progressive with soaring rhetoric on these issues.

"It's all very well to do the photo ops, the international pieces, but when you've got important questions like this back home that... [are] now are up in the air because of a lack of unanimity and cohesion."

PM Jacinda Ardern made the announcement today. Source: 1 NEWS


Don Brash says Massey's Vice Chancellor should consider resigning after email dump

Former National Party leader Don Brash is calling for Massey University's vice-chancellor to consider her position, saying it's "almost untenable".

The university prevented Dr Brash from speaking at its Manawatū campus last month.

He was due to give a speech about his time in politics, but vice-chancellor Jan Thomas cancelled the talk for security reasons.

The university had cited a Facebook post on 3 August that linked to the event page and included the comment "take a gun".

Documents obtained under the Official Information Act contain correspondence to and from Ms Thomas in the run-up to the cancellation.

In one email, on 9 July, the vice-chancellor said she did not want a "te tiriti led university to be seen to be endorsing racist behaviours".

On 10 July, Ms Thomas emailed to say she would like to know the options for banning the politics club from holding events on campus.

She said the "racist behaviour of Dr Brash - given te reo is an official language of NZ and we are a tiriti-led university - can't be ignored".

Speaking from China, Dr Brash said he considered Ms Thomas' position almost untenable and told RNZ that he believes she was "totally misleading".

"Quite frankly, I don't know if she can stay in her position."

Dr Brash has previously said he believed it was his views, rather than safety concerns, that led to him being banned from the publicly-funded university.

The documents also contain many emails sent to the university objecting to its cancellation decision.

- By Amy Williams

rnz.co.nz

Massey University vice-chancellor Jan Thomas and Don Brash Source: rnz.co.nz