Watch: Winston Peters uses Latin phrase while answering question on Simon Bridges' comments about PM's baby - 'Res ipsa loquitur'

Winston Peters has shown off his Latin knowledge while answering a question about Simon Bridges' comments on Jacinda Ardern's baby during his post-Cabinet address this afternoon.

The Acting Prime Minister was asked about his thoughts on Mr Bridges Radio Hauraki interview on Friday where the National Party leader suggested the baby "should be going to school in boy's clothes" when talking about gender.

"Well I think it's the Latin phrase res ipsa loquitur, the thing speaks for itself," Mr Peters said of the interview when told of its content.

When asked to elaborate on what he meant by the phrase Mr Peters replied: "What, when someone makes a fool of themselves do I want to elaborate my views?

"I think the thing speaks for itself, I'll leave you to come to a summation on that."

He said it was light hearted and "people listening to the full context would see it". Source: Breakfast

Earlier today on TVNZ1's Breakfast show Mr Bridges also addressed his comments saying they were light hearted and needed to be taken in context.

"We just want to wish the Prime Minister and her whānau and the little one all the very happiness," Mr Bridges said.


 

The Acting Prime Minister was asked about Mr Bridges Radio Hauraki interview at a post-Cabinet address today. Source: 1 NEWS



Chilly weather in store for much of the country with cold front set to hit Sunday

Chilly weather is in store for much of the country as a cold front sweeps over much of New Zealand from late Sunday and into Monday.

MetService says, "this front is forecast to deliver a cold and showery south to southwest flow across New Zealand, with snow lowering to 200 to 300 metres over the South Island, and possibly 500 to 600 metres across the lower North Island."

TVNZ weather presenter Dan Corbett gives the latest update. Source: 1 NEWS

But New Zealanders should expect a fine Saturday with the exception being the northern tip and the east coast of the North Island.

With Auckland getting to 20 degrees and most places in the South Island getting to 15-16 degrees.

MetService says late Tuesday, another front is forecast to approach the far south of New Zealand, and the west to southwest flow ahead of this front should strengthen.


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Detector dogs in prisons sniff out nearly one synthetic cannabis sample a week

A small group of specially trained detector dogs are sniffing out synthetic drugs in New Zealand’s prisons. 

Five dogs have been in action since March, searching for ever-changing psychoactive substances smuggled into prisons. 

Since then, the dogs have retrieved 33 samples of synthetic cannabis, nearly one a week. But that's nowhere near as high as other drugs that are found. 

But the Ministry of Corrections said it's front-footing potential prison deaths from synthetics after inmate fatalities overseas.

"It is on our streets, it is affecting our communities, so as a team the dog handlers felt that they wanted to front foot this emerging threat," Manager Specialist Search Jay Mills told 1 NEWS.

"We have a duty of care to our prisoners, our staff and our prisoners ensuring we keep our site safe."

It’s something Minister of Corrections Kelvin Davis supports.

"We know that psychoactive substances are out in the streets, in our communities and we would be naive to think people aren't trying to get them into our prisons," Mr Davis said. 

Corrections is working with the Ministry of Health, and Environmental Science and Research (ESR) to improve the scope of ingredients they can detect. 

"NPS (New Psychoactive Substances) is extremely difficult to keep on top of, in terms of the chemical makeup of the drug," Mr Mills said. 

It’s a tough job for both the dog, and trainers.

"We match it up to what we're searching for currently and if we see any differences or irregularities with ingredients it means we can go back to our training room and load our dogs with that odour. So we are constantly staying ahead of what's out there today," dog trainer Ricky Trevithick said. 

Training for the five dogs will be on-going, with ingredients constantly changing and new batches constantly coming onto the drug market.

1 NEWS reporter Emily Cooper has the exclusive details. Source: 1 NEWS

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Ten children taken to hospital after plane emits unknown substance over Carterton school


Ten primary school children in Carterton have been taken to Wairarapa Hospital after a plane is thought to have accidentally sprayed the school with pesticide. 

The incident happened at approximately 1pm at South End School in the town.

Wellington Free Ambulance says 10 children with moderate symptoms have been transported to the hospital in Masterton and paramedics are treating 40 other people - children and adults - with very minor symptoms. 

Four ambulances and a Lifeflight helicopter are being used, Geoff Procter of Wellington Free Ambulance said. 

“We are taking a precautionary approach. All the children and their families are being well looked after with extra food and water," he said. 

One-hundred-and-seven people are going through a decontamination process, consisting of washing down, and fresh dry clothes, Mr Procter said. 

"The decontamination process takes a while. We’re all here and on hand to make sure everyone is safe and well.” 

Symptoms the affected children have are generally low-level, consisting of nausea, vomiting and itchy eyes, he said. 

Mr Procter advises that if anyone‘s condition deteriorates, call 111. 

Parents have been seen arriving at the school with a change of clothes and children are slowly coming out one by one in towels. 

A plane is suspected of accidentally spraying the school with pesticide and several children have been hospitalised. Source: 1 NEWS

Carterton Fire senior station officer Wayne Robinson said local people have been presenting to the local medical centre after the incident. 

A 1 NEWS reporter at the scene says there are numerous appliances there and roads are blocked in several directions. 

NZ First MP Ron Mark who lives in Carterton has told 1 NEWS it seems a plane has accidentally sprayed the school with pesticide.

Police say they are investigating and are going door to door in the area checking on residents' welfare and trying to locate the source of the smell. 

They are also searching the school's grounds.

Carterton District Mayor John Booth says parents are very worried. 

A statement on the school's Facebook page read: "A plane flew in a southward direction and one student had seen 'stuff' coming out of the plane - so we assume it was a fertiliser of some sort - several students have experienced feeling quezzy and ucky."

Parents waiting outside South End School.
Parents waiting outside South End School. Source: 1 NEWS

This follows a report of an aircraft dropping an unknown substance near the school. Source: 1 NEWS


Dairy owners could be hit by restrictions on tobacco sales

Some Auckland dairy owners are optimistic that limiting where tobacco is sold could reduce the number of robberies.

Early findings from a Regional Public Health survey of Auckland dairy owners suggest they may be on board with legislation that will only permit the sale of tobacco from specialist stores.

While the idea has received support from some, others said it would drastically reduce sales and force some shops to shut down.

On Thursday night, there was a steady stream of customers filing through a West Auckland dairy.

The owner, who asked not to be named out of fear her store would be targeted for stocking tobacco, supported the idea of specialist, tobacco-only stores.

She said it could be the solution to reducing the number of dairy robberies.

"It may reduce it in the fact that being a specialised store, if the security and everything is correct, it might reduce it," she said.

It would likely affect her sales but she was confident her store would stay open.

"I suppose, there is something else a person would buy so I wouldn't really worry about it too much."

Just under 20 Auckland dairy owners were surveyed - and most of those businesses were family-owned.

Dean Adam, from Regional Public Health, said despite some owners being in the business for 35 years an increase in dairy robberies had caused anxiety for owners and many were happy to ditch the products.

"For them, they were quite happy not to sell this [tobacco] but their fear is that the dairy across the road is still selling it they're not going to be competitors, they'll lose business and for some of them, the margins are really small."

Auckland's Crime Prevention Group president Sunny Kaushal was surprised by the initial findings.

Many dairy owners relied on tobacco to boost sales, he said.

"Customers who are coming to buy the cigarettes are also buying a lot of other stuff from the shops so stopping these kinds of cigarettes would in fact damage their business."

The legislation could force many dairies to shut shop, he said.

"So many people are now self-employed, currently running their dairies and shops they would become un-employed."

Better solutions that reflected the "ground reality" for shop owners were needed, he said.

The preliminary results of the study are discussed in the latest issue of the New Zealand Medical Journal.

Katie Scotcher

rnz.co.nz 

Auckland's Crime Prevention Group president Sunny Kaushal says many dairy owners rely on tobacco to boost sales. Source: rnz.co.nz