Watch: Auckland's landmark Chelsea Sugar Factory throws open its doors once again

It's been a staple in Kiwi households for more than 130 years - and now, after a short hiatus, the sweet taste of Chelsea sugar is again opening its doors to the public.

The Chelsea Sugar Factory, near the Waitemata Harbour on Auckland's North Shore, is letting people through the gates to have a behind-the-scenes look at how it's all done.

In the 90s, tours at the factory were part of the local school curriculum, but health and safety regulations put a stop to it.

The Chelsea Sugar Factory and its recogniseable pink - or 'Tuscan red' packaging - will be open for tours once again in October. 

To have a sneak peek at the mountains of sugar behind the factory's doors, click the video above.

Health and safety put an end to the tours in the 90s, but now they are back to give people a little taste of the sweet stuff. Source: Seven Sharp



Queensland police hoping $100,000 reward will help identify who spiked strawberries with needles

Queensland police are yet to determine who is spiking store-sold strawberries with needles.

But they're hopeful a $A100,000 reward for information will lead to the capture of the culprit or culprits.

Consumers have been told to cut their strawberries up amid fears six brands across four states have been targeted with needle insertion.

Read more: Aussie strawberry scandal causes concern in New Zealand

"Our investigation is ongoing. It's fairly complex and fairly large because of the itinerant nature of employees in the industry," Detective Superintendent Terry Lawrence said.

"I won't go as far as saying we have specific leads.

"If we can narrow it down to a smaller geographical location and particular farms, that would be great for us."

Fruit sold under Berry Obsession, Berry Licious and Donnybrook brands originating from Queensland have been withdrawn from retailers.

NSW police have warned that fruit sold under the Love Berry, Delightful Strawberries and Oasis brands had needles inserted by a possible copycat.

A fresh report of a contamination in Townsville is being investigated, Queensland police said, following instances elsewhere in the state, as well as Victoria and NSW.

But authorities have stopped short of discouraging consumers from buying strawberries.

Sewing needles and pins have been deliberately placed inside strawberries across the ditch. Source: 1 NEWS

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Work starts for Hundertwasser Art Centre in Whangārei

Work's begun in earnest this week on Whangārei's Hundertwasser Art Centre.

Contractors have finished demolishing the old Harbour Board building on the site and started driving the piles.

A spokesman for the $28 million project, Greg Hayes, said the foundations would be supporting the largest earth-roof in the southern hemisphere.

Mr Hayes said 75 steel tubes will be driven 33 metres into the ground, then augured out and filled with steel and concrete to lock into the bedrock.

The job should take about a month, he said.

Mr Hayes said neighbours of the Hundertwasser project were braced for some serious thumping as the piles went in but there had been a lot less vibration than expected.

By Lois Williams

rnz.co.nz

Contractors have to drive 75 steel tubes 33 metres into the ground.
Contractors have to drive 75 steel tubes 33 metres into the ground. Source: rnz.co.nz

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Weekend's most read: Pregnant women refusing prenatal care after children taken by social services

This story was first published on Sunday September 16.

More than 6000 children are in the care of Oranga Tamaraki – a 22 per cent increase from six years ago. Source: 1 NEWS

Health professionals say women whose children have been taken by social services are refusing to seek prenatal care when they fall pregnant for fear of having their newborns taken, too.

One Kaitaia couple, Mary and Warren, had their first child taken into care by social services because of domestic violence and mental health problems.

Mary believes social services' decision to remove their child from their care was fair at the time, but she claims they "also said that I'd be able to get him back and that I'd get a house in six months".

When Mary became pregnant for a second time, it was six months before she sought prenatal care.

Mary and Warren's fears were realised when their second child was taken from them at birth, with Oranga Tamariki saying their baby was at risk.

"I just cried and wouldn't give her to them. The nurse actually had to take her off me," she said.

The couple's children are among more than 6000 New Zealand kids under the care of Oranga Tamariki this year – a 22 per cent increase on the number of children in care six years ago.

The agency says it only takes such drastic action when there are concerns of a serious nature, and only when all other options have been explored.

However, Northland midwife Colleen Brown is concerned the move is putting pregnant mothers off seeking help.

"There is no way, unless you are gonna go bush and have your pepe (baby), that you are gonna keep that pepe," Ms Brown said.

1 NEWS has spoken to several pregnant mothers who are considered at risk.

Some are expecting mothers who would like help with their drug and alcohol abuse but have not reached out for help out of fear of losing their children. Some have children who have already been removed from their care.

But Oranga Tamariki says those who do not seek help are putting their babies at further risk.

Deanne 'Dee' McManus-Emery, the regional manager for Oranga Tamariki South Auckland, says, "We are hearing stories from our families that we do know, but we're also hearing it from our community organisations, colleagues and also our health providers".

"What we're trying to do is work in partnership with those providers, ensuring that there is a jointed approach to ensure the right support services are wrapped around them," Ms McManus-Emery explained.

"We certainly would want families to be accessing their prenatal care because that gives children the best start in life."

Ms Brown is urging mothers with fears of losing their child "to take ownership of it" and get the help they need.

"They need to come forward because there is help available for them," she said.

Mary and Warren visit their children twice a week and are working with social agencies to get them back permanently.

"I'd like our kids back. I’d like to be given a chance," Warren said.


Man seriously injured in Napier stabbing

A man has been seriously injured after being stabbed in Napier overnight.

Police say the man was taken to Hawke's Bay Hospital after earlier presenting himself at Wellesley Medical Centre at around 10pm.

Police are investigating.

Police car generic.
Police car generic. Source: 1 NEWS