Wanted man who escaped police custody arrested after AOS callout in South Auckland

Armed police and the AOS were called out to an area in South Auckland today following sightings of a wanted man who allegedly pointed a pistol at a police officer earlier today.

Darcy Hayes, 48, was on the run after escaping police custody at Auckland District Court last Tuesday. 

Mr Hayes was found hiding under a house in McKean Avenue when a member of the public alerted police. 

A dog squad was sent in to retrieve Mr Hayes, who is again under police custody. 

Pedestrians were been advised to avoid the area and motorists have been encouraged to use alternative routes.


The AOS surrounded a Manurewa property following reports of a man with a gun, soon after Darcy Hayes was arrested. Source: 1 NEWS



Live Stream: Housing shortage set to be hot topic in Parliament's Question Time

Tune in live as the Opposition quizzes the Government over the rental market and KiwiBuild. Source: Other

Hamilton McDonald’s worker ordered to stop speaking te reo with customers

A teen employee at a Hamilton McDonald’s keen to celebrate Māori Language Week with customers had her enthusiasm dashed this week when a manager told her not to speak New Zealand's official language.

Janine Eru-Taueki, 19, was told it would be considered rude to address customers in a language other than English, she told Māori Television.

Some customers who don't speak te reo might think an employee is talking about them, a company representative told the station.

"This is the first time I've been told by anyone that I can't speak Māori," Ms Eru-Taueki said.

In 1976, the first fast food burger restaurant in NZ was opened in Porirua. Source: 1 NEWS

"I don't agree because Māori is an official language of this country. Some of the customers come up and ask if they can make their order in Māori. I was really sad the other night because I couldn't speak to them in Māori myself."

But McDonald’s officials said they are learning from the situation and will explore policies that might better support Māori Language Week in the future. The restaurant didn’t receive any customer complaints about Ms Eru-Taueki’s bilingual efforts, they confirmed.

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California woman allegedly invents fake husband to scam thousands of dollars

A woman in California is suspected of inventing a fake firefighter husband to scam donors out of thousands of dollars and supplies.

Ashley Bemis is accused of using social media to get donations which she says were for firefighters battling recent deadly wildfires in the US state.

Police say she used a Facebook group to reach out for help for her fake firefighter husband and his colleagues.

Ms Bemis then allegedly pocketed cash and sold items that were donated to line her own pockets.

Police say the money and goods total around $US11,000 worth.

Ms Bemis has not been charged.


Fluorescent whitebait unleashed near Nelson in native fish conservation effort

A school of brightly coloured whitebait are leading the way to help our native fish.

Dyed pink and orange, they've been sent swimming up a town culvert near Nelson to see if recent improvements are helping.

"They are really easy to spot in the culvert when they're bright pink or brown," said NIWA freshwater ecology technician Peter Williams.

Around 200 unmarked clear whitebait, 200 pink (Rhodamine B stained) whitebait, and 200 orange (Bismarck Brown stained) whitebait were released into the Reservoir Creek culvert in Richmond to battle upstream.

"Seventy-four per cent of New Zealand freshwater fish species are in decline and upstream barriers are stopping them from getting up to their habitat that they need to complete their life cycle," explained Mr Williams.

In April, the Tasman District Council stepped in to help, installing flexible weir baffles.

"Water goes from A to B very quickly in a natural culvert, that's what they're designed to do," said Fish and Wildlife Services' Tim Olley. "What we're looking to do is create resting pools in the culvert, low velocity areas for the fish to burst swim and rest, burst swim and rest, more or less like a stepladder."

The whitebait released have a 136-metre journey up the culvert while being monitored by NIWA, Tasman District Council and F&WS specialists over 48 hours. It's hoped the majority will make it out the other end.

NIWA and the Department of Conservation recently released national fish passage guidelines for keeping waterways swimmable. But freshwater ecologist Mike Joy says tougher rules are needed.

"A lot of these things (have) been put in and very, very little if any measurement of actually if they work or not," Mr Joy said.

"Without a doubt, the solution would be to not allow them to happen in the first place. Under the Freshwater Fisheries Act you're not allowed to impede the passage of native fish, so if you just said, 'No you couldn't do it', you wouldn't have to retrofit these things afterward."

The future of New Zealand’s native fish looks very bleak as scientists presented findings at a parliamentary select committee today. Source: 1 NEWS

Tasman District Council resource scientist Trevor James, who is also a member of the country's Fish Passage Advisory Group, agrees that "the best culvert is actually a bridge".

"So that's correct, but in the world of reality bridges are expensive - they have to be certified to take a lot of load all that sort of thing," he said.

He'd like to see all councils step up monitoring of fish passages after installation.

"Roading engineers contract out every year, every second year to monitor the culverts from an engineering point of view," he explained. "It would only be a small add-on to actually assess for fish passage."

NIWA says the guidelines have been well received by councils so far and the monitoring at the Reservoir Creek culvert will help other councils find cost-effective solutions for the future.

They’ve been seen swimming up a town culvert near Nelson to see if conservation efforts are working Source: 1 NEWS