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Vote Compass: Kiwis divided on Government providing free lunches at state schools

More than half of New Zealanders think the Government should provide free lunches for students in state schools.

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The exclusive numbers come from TVNZ’s Vote Compass, which has been completed by more than 140,000 people. Source: Breakfast

That’s according to exclusive numbers from TVNZ’s Vote Compass tool, which has been used by more than 140,000 people.

It revealed 51 per cent of the population believes the Government should provide free lunches, while 31 per cent are against the idea.

That left 18 per cent of voters who were either neutral or without an opinion.

Senior Research Fellow at AUT Lisa Chant says there’s particularly strong agreement among younger people.

“Eighteen- to 39-year-olds really strongly supported this,” she said.

“I just wondered whether we'd left too many of those people go hungry at school recently?”

Breaking it down

The majority of Green (82 per cent) and Labour (66 per cent) voters are in support of providing free lunches, whereas 50 per cent of National voters are opposed to the Government-funded lunches in state schools.

ACT voters are divided on the issue, with 34 per cent in support of the Government providing free lunches and 46 per cent opposed.

Source: 1 NEWS

To take part in Vote Compass, a survey tool which shows users how their views match up with party policies, go to tvnz.co.nz/votecompass

Developed by a team of social and statistical scientists from Vox Pop Labs, Vote Compass is a civic engagement application offered in New Zealand exclusively by TVNZ. The findings are based on 58,669 respondents who participated in Vote Compass from August
30, 2020 to September 8, 2020.

Unlike online opinion polls, respondents to Vote Compass are not pre-selected. Similar to opinion polls, however, the data are a non-random sample from the population and have been weighted in order to approximate a representative sample. Vote Compass data have been weighted by gender, age, education, language, region and past vote to ensure the sample’s composition reflects that of the actual  population of New Zealand according to census data and other population estimates.