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Two people who flew out of Auckland without exemptions slapped with police notices

Two people have been slapped with infringement notices after flying out of Auckland without exemptions earlier this week.

A flight attendant and passenger on board a plane. Source: istock.com

One student flew out from Auckland to Wellington. It comes after an earlier student flew out from Auckland to Christchurch before catching another flight to Dunedin on Monday, Police Commissioner Andrew Coster said in a statement.

Covid-19 Response Minister Chris Hipkins said he would like to check what protocols are in place at Auckland Airport.

He says people without exemptions should not have been allowed into the terminal building. 

Meanwhile, Coster said police checkpoints south of Auckland "ran smoothly overnight" as the country south of Auckland moved to Alert Level 3, with light traffic and only "a small number of vehicles" being turned away for non-essential travel.

While the number of vehicles travelling through the checkpoints is expected to increase on Wednesday, most motorists have had the correct documentation at this stage, resulting in minimal wait times.

Coster said while further south, the transition to Level 3 has been smooth, there has been a "significant increase" in traffic in some areas.

"Remember, Alert Level 3 means we need to stay in our bubbles and continue working from home where possible," he said.

Compliance under Alert Level restrictions

Source: istock.com

As of 5pm on Tuesday, 139 people have been charged with 148 offences nationwide since Alert Level 4 restrictions began.

Of the charges filed, 95 were for failing to comply with order; 34 for failing to comply with direction, prohibition or restriction; 15 for breaches to the Health Act; and four for assaulting, threatening, hindering or obstructing an enforcement officer.

In the same time period, 374 people were issued formal warnings for 377 offences.

Of that number, 144 were for failing to comply with order; 122 for failing to comply with direction, prohibition or restriction; 110 for breaches to the Health Act; and one for assaulting, threatening, hindering or obstructing an enforcement officer.

In addition, police have issued 2707 infringements nationwide as of 5pm on Tuesday since officers began issuing infringements for Covid-related breaches on August 19.

Of that number, 2494 were issued for failing to remain at a current home or residence; 56 for failing to wear a face covering on premises; 74 for failing to comply with applicable physical distancing rules; and 40 for obstructing or hindering a medical officer of health or a person assisting them, or complying with a Covid-19 order.

A further six were issued for a person failing to wear a face covering on public transport, seven for a person in control of a premises failing to close as required; 19 for a person in control of a workplace failing to display a QR code; and 11 for organising a gathering in an outdoor place.

Police have also received 14,003 online breach notifications - 8615 about a gathering, 4038 about a business, and 1350 about an individual.

A total of 8924 Covid-related calls were also made to the 105 phone line, including 6447 calls requesting information, and 2477 to report perceived Covid-19 breaches.

Police make family harm appeal

Meanwhile, police are urging anyone experiencing abuse or violence to seek support as the country enters its third week of alert level restrictions.

Coster said preliminary data shows the number of reported family harm incidents increased by 3.9 per cent in the first week of Alert Level 4 and 6.2 per cent in the second week.

He said while there has been a small increase, family harm reports fluctuate due to a range of external factors and the data remains within the normal range.

Source: 1 NEWS

Coster said police saw "a distinct spike in reports of family harm" in the first week of Alert Level 4 last year.

"While that is not the case this year, we know family harm incidents are typically underreported to police and, in the current situation, it may be more difficult for some to reach out to us," he said.

"Alert level restrictions can put additional pressure on families and increase the risk of violence from a partner or family member."

"We want anyone experiencing harm at home to know that police are here to help, no matter the alert level."Anyone feeling scared, threatened or unsafe has been urged to call police on 111.

People who are unable to call have been advised to leave their bubble and ask a neighbour or passer-by to call for them.

"We also urge anyone with concerns about a loved one or friend to call us on their behalf – you could be saving their life."