'Treasure trove' of colonial history unearthed by Wellington road works

Road works in central Wellington have uncovered what has been described as a "treasure trove" of colonial history.

Lombard Lane sits between high rise hotels, apartments and car parking buildings in a trendy shopping and cafe area of the capital's CBD. 

Road workers redeveloping the road have come across the remains of a fort, which protected early port buildings and date back to the 1840s. 

They have also discovered the foundations of those buildings. 

"This tells us a lot about the first buildings that were established on the beach when the first settlers arrived," said archaeologist Andy Dodd. 

The site, just off Cuba Street, was once the waterfront. As well as early buildings and a fort, shells have been discovered at the site. 

While the site tells us about New Zealand's early settler history, the site is also important to local iwi. 

"I think the colonial history and the Maori history are so intertwined that this is a reminder of the history at its very early stages," said Mark Te One of Te Ati Awa Taranaki iwi. 

He said the discovery has been made in the junction between a lot of former pa sites, in particular Te Aro Pa, Kumutoto Pa and Pipitea Pa, which in most cases have disappeared. 

"So any reminder to them is very important."

The site was blessed on Monday by those whose ancestors lived at one of those many pa. 

The Wellington City Council is working with local iwi to decide how to best inform visitors and locals about the significance of the area.

The archaeological find includes part of a wall dating back to the New Zealand Land Wars. Source: 1 NEWS

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Police probe racist emails sent to Māori academic

A Māori language lecturer at Victoria University has complained to police after receiving a string of racist emails.

Vini Olsen-Reeder publicly threw his support behind Wellington City Council's bid to make Te Reo Māori more visible around the city in May.

But within days he started receiving angry emails from complete strangers.

One sender told him Te Reo Māori was an ugly language used by tribal, tattooed, former cannibals and not needed or wanted by anglophones.

Two emails have been sent to his account since then from multiple senders - one of whom used a fake identity.

The emails were also sent to Otago University and to colleagues of Mr Olsen-Reeder at Victoria.

Mr Olsen-Reeder was told by colleagues to ignore them, but after the third email he decided to call the police.

They have since opened a case file for him, where his emails will be monitored. Police will only act on them under the Harmful Digital Communications Act if they are found to pose a direct threat.

"A lot of my colleagues, as academics, we are open to critique. But people tend to think that means they get to be horrible human beings and say whatever they like and that they can be terrifically racist and mean.

"My worry is that, because this is through email, my colleagues will think there's nothing they can do. Well that's actually not true. I want everyone to know that there are avenues you can pursue so emails like this can be monitored."

Twenty-four people have been imprisoned under the Act since its inception in 2015 and others have been charged with home detention or community service.

However, Internet Safety Detective, Damian Rapira, said emails must reach a certain threshold before a criminal charge can be laid.

"We have to take into account things like, Is there a realistic prospect of that threat being carried out? Is there a realistic opportunity for that threat? Is it building? Is there a previous domestic dispute between the two people involved?

"There's so many variables in this particular space."

According to online safety agency, Netsafe, one in 10 adult New Zealanders receive at least one harmful digital communication each year.

Chief executive Martin Cocker said cyber bullies may think they're anonymous but they're not.

"There is in New Zealand an un-masking law. There's the ability to request that someone be identified.

"People use anonymity but they forget that they are not typically anonymous to the platform that they are sending the emails from."

But for Mr Olsen-Reeder speaking out about the emails wasn't just about catching the culprits.

He said people should know the difference between genuine disagreement and unacceptable behaviour.

"Māori are always pitched as politicising issues, so we're always the ones presented as angry and as "the fighters". But we do a lot of disagreeing because there are lots of things happening that genuinely need disagreement.

"One of the things that makes me really sad and angry is that there are other people in society who feel free to be as politically-charged and angry as they like in spaces that are actually just totally inappropriate and unreasonable."

Mr Olsen-Reeder has not replied to any of the emails, and does not intend to.

- By Te Aniwa Hurihanganui
rnz.co.nz

Māori language lecturer Vini Olsen-Reeder with some of the emails he has been sent. Source: RNZ / Te Aniwa Hurihanganui

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MP Jami-Lee Ross to make official police complaint against National leader Simon Bridges, will resign from Parliament

National's MP for Botany, Jami-Lee Ross, will be laying an official police complaint against National Party leader Simon Bridges tomorrow, in which he'll allege electoral fraud.

Jami-Lee Ross.
Jami-Lee Ross. Source: 1 NEWS

Mr Ross also told media this morning he would resign as a member of Parliament on Friday, sparking a by-election for the Botany seat.

Mr Ross said he would run as an independent.

Mr Ross made a number of claims about the National Party leader in relation to donations. Mr Bridges has denied any wrongdoing. Source: 1 NEWS

Today he followed up on allegations of unlawful activity from Simon Bridges over electoral donations. 

"Simon Bridges knows exactly what Cathedral Club is. It is a name used to hide a donation from a close friend of his. He claims it was a clerical error, I claim BS on that," Mr Ross said.

"I believe Simon Bridges is a corrupt politician."

He later added: "On Monday 14th of May this year, I attended a dinner with Simon Bridges at the home of a wealthy Chinese businessman.

"The following week ...Simon called me in the evening he'd been at a fundraiser with Paul Goldsmith.

"He had been offered a donation $100,000 donation from the same wealthy businessman."

Mr Ross alleged Mr Bridges did not want the donation to be public, and asked Mr Ross to ensure it.

"I duly carried out Simon Bridges' wish."

He said it was split into smaller donations.

Mr Ross then said he had a recorded conversation with Mr Bridges about the alleged events.

Mr Bridges' office has previously directed media questions about the Cathedral Club to the party.

A spokesperson told Radio NZ yesterday that the donation error was down to the local Tauranga electoral committee and said the Electoral Commission was contacted to seek advice. The return was then amended and re-submitted.

Mr Ross' remarks this morning came a day after Bridges outed him as the likely leaker of his expenses, following the completion of a PWC report into the leaking.

"I'm standing up for what I believe in. New Zealand deserves better from the National Party," Mr Ross said today.

"I’m now the subject of a smear campaign.

"Simon is a flawed individual without a moral compass."

After taking sick leave earlier this month, Mr Ross said today he had had a mental breakdown but was now in good health.

He claimed the PWC report was inaccurate, and the only time he messaged the journalist who released the National Party expenses was when they texted him to ask how he was.

Mr Bridges yesterday denied all of Mr Ross' accusations and said: "He would say those things, given the situation."

 



Person missing after Christchurch home destroyed by fire

One person is still unaccounted for after a house was completely burnt to the ground in Christchurch early this morning. 

The fire service was called to the scene on Coates Road, Birdlings Flat, at around 4am.

A fire spokesperson told 1 NEWS the house was burning strongly upon arrival at the scene.

Two fire trucks and two tankers which were working on fully extinguishing the blaze has since left the scene.


Fire generic
File picture. Source: 1 NEWS