Three teenage boys arrested after aggravated robbery of Napier petrol station

Three 17-year-old boys have been arrested following the robbery of a Napier petrol station yesterday morning.

According to Police, at around 6am yesterday, three armed suspects entered the Z Petrol Station on Kennedy Road in Napier, demanded goods from an attendant before fleeing the scene with the items.

The attendant was left shaken from the incident but was uninjured.

A black Nike sports bag containing items of interest to police is believed to have been dumped somewhere between the petrol station and suburb of Marewa. 

Members of the public who may have located the bag or have any relevant information have been advised to contact police.

Two of the teenagers will appear in Hastings District Court tomorrow, while a third will appear in the same court next week facing one charge of aggravated robbery.

Source: 1 NEWS



Tense confrontation amid peaceful vigils one year after white supremacist rally in Charlottesville

The city of Charlottesville marked the anniversary of last year's white supremacist violence that sent ripples through the country with largely peaceful vigils and other events, but police had a brief, tense confrontation with demonstrators angry over the heavy security presence there this weekend.

A group anti-fascism demonstrators march in the downtown area in anticipation of the anniversary of last year's Unite the Right rally. Source: Associated Press

"Why are you in riot gear? We don't see no riot here," activists chanted Saturday evening (local time).

Shortly before a planned evening rally to mark the anniversary of a campus confrontation between torch-carrying white nationalists and counterprotesters, activists unfurled a banner that said, "Last year they came w/ torches. This year they come w/ badges."

Demonstrators carry banners in front of the Rotunda on the campus of the University of Virginia. Source: Associated Press

A group of more than 200 protesters — students, residents and others — then marched to another part of the University of Virginia's campus, where many in the crowd shouted at officers in riot gear forming a line.

A group of anti-fascist and Black Lives Matter demonstrators march in front of the Rotunda on the campus of the University of Virginia. Source: Associated Press

Kibiriti Majuto, a coordinator for UVA Students United, said the students moved to another part of campus because they didn't want to be "caged" in the area where the planned rally area.

Mr Majuto said police "were not on our side" last year when white supremacists surrounded counter-protesters on the rotunda.

"Cops and Klan go hand in hand," he said.

State Police patrol the road in front of Market Street park with the state of Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Source: Associated Press

Charlottesville city councilman Wes Bellamy said he tried to diffuse the situation and told the police commander that students were upset by the officers' tactics, with "over-the-top" riot gear.

After a few minutes, most demonstrators began walking away. There were no immediate reports of arrests on campus.

At some point after the UVA rally, dozens of demonstrators marched off campus through other parts of the city, chanting "Whose streets? Our streets" and "Who do you protect? Who do you serve?"

A group of anti-fascist and Black Lives Matter demonstrators march on the campus of the University of Virginia. Source: Associated Press

The group made its way to downtown before dispersing.

The rest of the day had been much quieter.

In the downtown shopping district this morning, officers outnumbered visitors. Concrete barriers and metal fences had been erected, and police searched bags at two checkpoints.

"It's nice that they're here to protect us," said Lara Mitchell, 66, who works at a shop selling artwork, jewelry, and other items.

"It feels good that they're here in front of our store. Last year was a whole different story. It looked like a war zone last year."

On August 12, hundreds of white nationalists — including neo-Nazis, skinheads and Ku Klux Klan members — descended on Charlottesville in part to protest the city's decision to remove a monument to Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a park.

State Police patrol the road in front of Market Street park with the state of Confederate General Robert E. Lee as they lock down the downtown area. Source: Associated Press

Fighting broke out between attendees and counterprotesters that day. Authorities eventually forced the crowd to disperse, but a car later barreled into a crowd of peaceful counterprotesters, killing 32-year-old Heather Heyer.

The death toll rose to three when a state police helicopter that had been monitoring the event and assisting with the governor's motorcade crashed, killing two troopers.

A protester confronts riot gear-clad police on the campus of the University of Virginia during a rally to mark the anniversary of last year's Unite the Right rally. Source: Associated Press

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Most read: 'Can I be a good politician while also being a good mum?' Jacinda Ardern opens up about her balancing act

Less than a year ago, Jacinda Ardern took on the weight of leading a country and the global fame that came with it.

Now for motherhood.

"I'm seven weeks in. I don't think I can claim to be the knower of all things and a baby whisperer. I'm a new mum and I imagine I'm going to learn a lot of things along the way," New Zealand's Prime Minister told AAP at the end of her first week back in parliament after six weeks of maternity leave.

"I don't feel like I should be a poster child for anything."

It's fair to say it's been a busy week back in the captain's chair, one laden with a flurry of government announcements, welcomes back, and fierce debate about the state of the economy.

Meanwhile, Ardern's daughter, Neve, has settled into the Prime Minister's floor of the Beehive government offices.

"(It's) top of my mind: can I be a good politician while also being a good mum? And I believe it's possible, but ask me in three years," Ardern says.

The Prime Minister says Neve will go to a public school. Source: Breakfast

"I, just at the end of every day, have to feel like I did my best for both."

That said, the 38-year-old insists she's got it easier than many new parents and that the logistics have been straight-forward so far.

Partner Clarke Gayford is taking on the role of full-time dad, space has been made for Neve and everything she needs, and the Prime Minister has a degree of flexibility in her scheduele - breaking up her days into three-hour slots to allow for feeding.

"Every parent when they're going back into the workplace makes a bit of an adjustment, and I'll be no different. But in lots of ways I'm also lucky," Ardern says.

"Not everyone has that. I'm in a pretty good position to make this work."

So is there now pressure to set an example for working families?

"I feel that pressure on everything," she replies.

The list that follows includes: proving a complex coalition government can work, living up to the expectations of the progressive movement she leads, doing her best for her country and, now, being the best mother she can be.

The prime minister has landed in Wellington to get back to work after her six-week maternity leave but first she’ll have to make some changes to Premier House. Source: 1 NEWS

"So, you know, pick your guilt," she laughs.

In June, Ardern became the first elected world leader to take maternity leave.

Neve accompanied her mother to a major government announcement on Friday.

The family will take its first overseas trip together in September to the United Nations in New York.

Jessica Mutch interviewed the PM yesterday as she returned to work after six weeks maternity leave. Source: Breakfast

Ms Ardern is back on the job as Prime Minister after six weeks of maternity leave. Source: 1 NEWS

The Prime Minister was met by cheers and a speech by Winston Peters. Source: 1 NEWS