Te Tari - The Office: Inside Speaker Trevor Mallard's office, full of history and old wigs

TVNZ1's Whena Owen takes a look around the Speaker's office. 

Whena Owen visits Chris Bishop in this week's episode of Te Tari (The Office). What his wall photos reveal about the Hutt South MP. Source: 1 NEWS

Previous Te Tari - The Office. 

Speaker Trevor Mallard shows Whena around his office full of history and old wigs "I’ve got to learn not to interfere too often.." Source: Q+A



'I'm absolutely stoked' - Hamilton McDonald's worker scolded by manager now allowed to speak Te Reo Māori with customers

A McDonald's employee who was chastised by her manager for speaking Te Reo Māori at work has received an apology.

Janine Eru-Taueki, 19, was keen to celebrate Māori Language Week with customers at the Hamilton McDonald's where she worked, but had her enthusiasm dashed when a manager told her not to speak New Zealand's official language.

Janine was told it would be considered rude to address customers in a language other than English, she told Māori Television.

However, Māori Television now reports that Janine has received an apology from her manager and will be allowed to use te reo in the workplace from now on.

"I feel at peace about it now. They're allowing me and all Māori-speaking employees to speak Māori to staff and customers. I'm absolutely stoked," Janine says.

The teenager is also happy she gets to keep her job.

"I thought I might lose my job, but because they've changed their policy I still have a job."

McDonald's officials said they are learning from the situation and will explore policies that might better support Māori Language Week in the future.

The restaurant didn’t receive any customer complaints about Janine's bilingual efforts, they confirmed.

McDonald's Hamilton stores are planning to offer a bilingual menu to customers.

TODAY'S
TOP STORIES

BPA-free plastic containers may not be less toxic

Substitutes for BPA plastics may have ingredients that cause similar problems as the product they're replacing.

Nearly two decades ago, researchers found the plastics ingredient known as BPA was causing a sudden increase in abnormal animal egg chromosomes.

The discovery resulted in more products being developed as alternatives, so they didn't contain the toxic ingredient.

However, Washington State University spokesperson, Patricia Hunt, said an array of substitutes used to replace BPA appear to come with similar problems.

Ms Hunt said more work is needed to determine whether some replacements are safer than others.

Plastic products that show physical signs of damage or ageing cannot be considered safe, she said.

Chemicals expert at the University of Melbourne, Professor Ian Rae, said whether someone has been affected by BPA won't be obvious straight away.

"BPA is known to be a hormone mimic. The activity is modest, but BPA is widely used in plastics and other materials and we are all exposed to it in one way or another.

"Because the effects are slow to develop and BPA may affect different people in different ways, it has been hard for regulators and even harder for consumers to assess the risks we may be facing. Most regulators have judged that the toxic effects are below levels of concern."

He said people need to be just as cautious around non-BPA products.

"Some manufacturers, perhaps sensing that bans might be imposed or - to take a more nuanced view - that consumers might respond to concerns expressed by others and avoid BPA-containing products, have taken cautious action.

"Some actions involve the use of materials that do not require the addition of BPA, but others mean turning from BPA to alternatives that can provide the same actions as BPA."

rnz.co.nz

Source: rnz.co.nz

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

Woman, 72, charged after bus crash that left two pedestrians dead in South Auckland

A 72-year-old woman has been charged over a fatal bus crash in April that left two people dead in Papatoetoe, Auckland.

Taylor Charles King, aged 23, from Papatoetoe and 34-year-old Jeremy Tokotai Kaukasi died after the crash on Puhinui Road in Papatoetoe at about 6.50pm on Saturday, April 14.

The men had just picked up a meal in Papatoetoe when they were hit and killed. Source: 1 NEWS

The two men were crossing the road at the time.

Police say the woman has been summonsed to appear in the Manukau District Court on October 25 to face two charges of careless driving causing death.

A pair of pedestrians were crossing the road when they were struck by the bus at 7pm last night. Source: 1 NEWS


More than half of NZ thinks Te Reo Māori should be core primary school subject, new survey reveals

A new survey reveals more than half of New Zealanders say Te Reo Māori should be a core subject in primary schools.

According to Stats NZ, data about attitudes to the Māori language was collected for the first time in New Zealand's biggest survey of well-being – the General Social Survey (GSS) 2016.

In this survey, 53 per cent of the respondents said they either strongly agreed or agreed that Te Reo Māori should be a core subject in primary schools.

Children are at the centre of Te Reo Māori revitalisation efforts during Maori Language Week. Source: 1 NEWS

"Te Reo Māori is recognised as a taonga, or treasure, for all New Zealanders," labour market and household statistics senior manager Jason Attewell said.

"‘The GSS survey shows about half of New Zealanders have positive attitudes to Te Reo Māori."

The GSS also asked whether the "Government should encourage and support the use of Māori in everyday situations".

Almost half (49 per cent) of adult New Zealanders said they strongly agreed or agreed with this statement.

About 45 per cent supported the statement "signage should be both in Māori and English".

Everyone at the Ministry for Business Innovation and Employment's Wellington HQ was singing from the same song sheet as part of the ministry's Te Wiki o Te Reo Māori events. Source: 1 NEWS

Thirty-five per cent either strongly agreed or agreed with the statement "it would be good if all people living in New Zealand spoke Māori and English".

Nearly half of New Zealanders had used at least some te reo words or phrases in the previous four weeks.

Support for te reo was strongest among New Zealanders aged 15 - 44 years.

Hīkoia te Kōrero was about celebrating and promoting the Māori language to all New Zealanders. Source: 1 NEWS