'I still feel the hurt inside me ... inside my whanau' - Urewera raids still raw for locals 10 years on

This weekend mark's the 10th anniversary of the now infamous Urewera raids and for many locals targeted, the hurt still remains. 

The raids focused on the activities of a group of people who appeared to be involved in military-style training camps in the Te Urewera Ranges in the Eastern Bay of Plenty.

Four of those arrested were eventually convicted of firearms charges.

Seven years after the raids, police apologised to the Tuhoe community they had terrorised. 

However, the official apology has carried little weight for some members of the Hillman family, who saw their father hauled away by armed police while they were then ordered to spend the day in their garage. 

"There was no kai for my little brothers," Te Kawerua Hillman told 1 NEWS. 

"They had to go toilet outside the garage door with all the cops around watching."

Te Ahoaho Hillman said he can "still feel the hurt" inside him. 

"I still feel the hurt inside my whanau and from there, I've just been going backwards."

It's been a decade since armed police swooped on Bay of Plenty locals believed to be involved in military style training camps. Source: 1 NEWS



Police appeal for sightings after man found dead on Auckland road

A body has been found on an Auckland road after being hit by a vehicle, but police believe the man may have already been deceased before the incident.

Police car generic.
Police car generic. Source: 1 NEWS

Police were called to the scene on Popes Road, Takanini, at 7.20pm after reports that a pedestrian had been hit by a car.

Police say initial indications are that the man was already deceased on the road when hit by the driver who contacted emergency services.

Police are investigating and no further information is available at this time.

Anyone who saw a man wearing a red checkered shirt and jeans hitchhiking along Popes Road earlier this evening has been advised to contact Papakura Police on 09 295 0200.



Canterbury University threatened with legal action by one of its students over car parking fees - 'you are going into debt over this'

Canterbury University is being threatened with legal action by one of its law students over car parking.

Canterbury University student Kelly Phillips has accused the university of cashing in on staff and students' parking fees.

Students are currently paying $400 a year for parking, while staff are paying double the amount.

"It just means you've paid for a spot, but you're not guaranteed you're going to get it," Ms Phillips said.

While the parking is fluid, the fees are set - and rising - by 15 per cent a year.

Canterbury University is unique from most universities in that it has the space on its 80-hectare Ilam campus to provide parking, but it comes at a cost.

"If you have to borrow an additional $500 a year to pay for parking, you are going into debt over this," Ms Phillips said.

She claims the university has collected more than $1.3 million in parking fees from students and staff last year alone.

"Where is the money going? What is it being used for or is it just revenue gathering?"

But Canterbury University Vice-Chancellor Rod Carr claims the university "is not seeking to make money out of car parking".

"It is seeking simply to cover the full whole of life cost of providing carparking on campus," Mr Carr explained.

He says the parking fees are going towards tar sealing, drainage, potholes, lighting and security at the university.

However, Ms Phillips says it "doesn't add up".

She claims that when she asked under the Official Information Act for a breakdown of parking-related expenditure, it could not be provided.

"The Local Government Act basically says that where an entity has the ability to charge a fee for service, it cannot exceed the cost of actually providing that service," she said.

Mr Carr responded, "If you've got the opportunity as a law student to get a learning experience at the taxpayer's expense, you should probably seek that out".

Ms Phillips has since engaged a barrister to help find out where staff and students' parking fees are going.

A uni student is claiming the university’s has collected over $1 million in parking fees. Source: 1 NEWS


Weekend's most read: Noisy street racers disrupting terminally ill Timaru hospice patients' final days

This story was first published on Saturday September 16.

Timaru’s Hospice is pleading for quiet and some respect after noisy night time drivers have been disturbing their terminally ill patients.

Timaru’s Hospice is pleading for quiet and respect for their patients. Source: 1 NEWS

After a long battle with throat cancer Charles Roebuck’s been given just days to live, but he says his final nights are being disrupted by street racers speeding down the road around the Hospice.

“Here I am quietly getting some rest and next thing this is a race-strip,” Hospice patient Charles Roebuck told 1 NEWS.

He’s not the first patient to complain about the disruption.

“We thank him very much for raising this issue of the traffic around Hospice, because we work here and we’re not as conscious often as the patients are,” says Hospice South Canterbury general manager Peter O’Neill.

Hospice staff are asking driver for a little consideration for their patients.

"To think that is might be one of their relatives one day or one of their friends and just that due respect for common decency I suppose," says Mr O’Neill.

Mr Roebuck has even written a letter to the Timaru District Council with his concerns.

“This place is soundproofed, I mean it's got double glazing, but with those cars zapping backwards and forwards."

The council says they’ve only just become aware of the issue and are now looking at options for putting up signs to encourage people to slow down.


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