Stan Walker: Those who thought he 'was on crack' during illness must be feeling 'pretty dumb right now'

Stan Walker says some people thought he was on "crack or whatever" when his health condition became evident last year, but he bets they'll be feeling "pretty dumb right now".

The Kiwi singer made the comment in an Instagram post as he released a new trailer for his upcoming documentary detailing his serious health battles over the past year.

He hit out out at nasty speculation last year about the causes of his sudden weight loss.

"I bet half the people thinking I was on crack or whatever y'all were saying are feel(ing) pretty dumb right now," he wrote.

"Ah well, we are all know it alls sometimes & just make up stories. Its allgood," he added. 

"This is bigger than all the talkers talking. It's bigger than me. Its bigger than whats happened & is happening to me. There is always someone worse off going through alot worse," Walker continued. 

It's been hard for my mum, she cries everyday and she blames herself too - Stan Walker in the documentary Stan

"All im gonna say is that im blessed to be alive & well. God is good & ive been blessed with a back bone of whanau & friends that go through the highs & the lowest of lows with me. So yeah just have a watch this Sunday."

The documentary Stan follows the singer through the process of treatment and surgery for a rare cancer causing gene that runs in his family.

The gene mutation is responsible for the death of 25 members of his family.

It is understood that Walker has had his stomach removed as a result.

The genetic mutation estimated to cause stomach cancer by the age of 40 in 70 per cent of the people who have it.

The trailer features Walker's mother caring for him in hospital.

"It's been hard for my mum, she cries everyday and she blames herself too," Walker says.

"What if there's complications, that's how I die."

The trailer also features an interview with his mum.

"I'd rather me go before my children, anyone would, any mother and father would," she says.

The popular singer is inspiring young Kiwis through his work with Youthline.
Source: 1 NEWS



Refugee quota increase a proud moment, Red Cross says, but now it's time to prepare

Jacinda Ardern's announcement yesterday that we will increase our yearly refugee intake to 1500 by 2020 was a proud moment for New Zealand, says Red Cross official Rachel O'Conner.

But there are some things we will have to do as a nation to prepare for the increase, which will result in New Zealand having doubled its intake in less than five years, she told TVNZ1's Breakfast this morning.

"We'll need people to respond, we're going to need people to volunteer, to donate items," she said. "But a lot of it is about...having welcoming communities."

Resettlement, she explained, is difficult - away from family and friends, without work and often having to learn a new language.

"Kiwis have this value of showing care and compassion, and that is what helps build that sense of belonging," said Ms O'Conner, who serves as national migration programmes manager for the humanitarian organisation.

That's 500 extra people who'll be making New Zealand home annually. Source: 1 NEWS

Under the Prime Minister's plan, six new resettlement communities will be established so that existing ones in New Zealand aren't over-burdened. The towns, however, haven't yet been chosen.

"We're going to be looking for councils and community groups to put up their hands and say, 'Yup, we want to be one of the new six'," Ms O'Conner said.

Ms O'Conner described yesterday's announcement as "a great start". But with 1.4 million people in desperate need of resettlement, "we're seeing unprecedented needs globally at the moment", she added, explaining that the Government also needs to take another good look at foreign aid and peace building activities.

Even after yesterday's announcement, New Zealand is far from being a leader in terms of refugee intake numbers.

PM Jacinda Ardern made the announcement today. Source: 1 NEWS

"But we are leaders in the terms of the quality of resettlement that we provide," she said, telling the story of a mum who had carried her disabled teen son on her back for his entire life because they didn't have access to health care in their previous country.

After arriving in Auckland, the boy was given a wheelchair and it changed both of their lives, O'Conner said.

"She kept saying, 'I can't believe I don't have to carry him anymore'," she recalled.

Jacinda Ardern’s announcement yesterday means six new settlement locations will be in the works, Rachel O’Conner told Breakfast. Source: Breakfast

TODAY'S
TOP STORIES

'What’s up Muzza' - is it weird to call your parents by their first name?

What do you call your parents - mum and dad, or Geoff and Pam?

The idea some people call their parents by their first name was a hot topic on Breakfast this morning, with Hayley Holt saying it was a bit weird calling her parents by their given names.

‘I’d feel a bit odd, ‘hey Robin, what’s up Muzza?’”

Many viewers said calling parents by their given names was disrespectful, with one viewer saying she had earned the title of mum.

Another said when children were older, it could be a discussion families could have together.

Newsreader Scotty Morrison said in Te Reo Māori there were “beautiful terms” for older members of the whanāu.

“As our people get older they get more and more respect because of the life they have had, the life experience, the knowledge that they’ve gained," he said. 

“It’s important in Māori culture to have that respect for the older generation.”

Some Breakfast viewers thought it was disrespectful not to be called mum or dad. Source: Breakfast


Topics

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

Ozzy Osbourne confirms two New Zealand shows as part of farewell world tour

Ozzy Osbourne has confirmed two final shows in New Zealand in March 2019 as part of his farewell world tour, No More Tours 2.

The former Black Sabbath singer will play shows in Christchurch at Horncastle Arena on March 13 and Auckland’s Spark Arena on March 16.

Heavy metal legends Judas Priest, who are on their first New Zealand tour, will open for Osbourne.

The 69-year-old will celebrate a career which began in 1968 when Black Sabbath was formed alongside long-time collaborators, guitarist Zakk Wylde, Blasko on bass, drummer Tommy Clufetos and Adam Wakeman on keyboards.

Ozzy Osbourne.


Police on the hunt after man seriously hurt in Hamilton shooting

A man has sustained serious injuries after being shot in Hamilton last night

Police responded to Derby Street, Nawton at 10:25pm after receiving reports of a shooting.

An investigation is underway to establish exactly what has occurred and inquiries are being made to find the offenders, who left the scene in a car.

The man is in a stable condition in a high dependency unit at Waikato Hospital.  

A scene examination on Derby Street will continue this morning.

Police car generic.
Police car generic. Source: 1 NEWS

Police are keen to talk to anyone who was in the area last night and may have information of interest to the investigation.

The incident took place in Nawton at 10.25pm yesterday – the offender fled the scene by car. Source: Breakfast