Some New World stores in North Island revealed to have facial recognition CCTV technology

New World has revealed that facial recognition CCTV technology is being used in some of its stores after an inquiry over a Dunedin man mistakenly identified as a shoplifter.

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For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6pm. Source: 1 NEWS

A human error lead to the man being mistakenly identified, with Foodstuffs NZ claiming in response that facial recognition technology was not used in South Island stores, the Otago Daily Times reports.

"A handful of stores in the North Island have facial recognition CCTV technology as part of their security system," Foodstuffs told the newspaper in response to their inquiry.

"We cannot provide specific store detail."

The newspaper also revealed that a different system that "bridges the gap between businesses and the police" is being used at some South Island stores, including the Centre City New World in Dunedin.

Mechanic Daniel Ryan was questioned recently by staff at that store after he was identified as a shoplifter.

Staff realised a mistake had been made and Mr Ryan received an apology.

"It's quite bruising to be shuffled off to the side," he said.

The Guardian reported 59% of United Kingdom fashion retailers use facial tracking, which captured the faces of customers, before referencing their data with those of known criminals.

Foodstuffs, which owns New World, Pak N Save and Four Square, uses the technology in some of its North Island stores. Source: 1 NEWS

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Record number of asylum seekers in NZ last year

More asylum seekers claimed refuge once they were in New Zealand last year than in any year on record.

China had the highest number of approvals, followed by Russia and Turkey.

Asylum claims grew to 438, but a higher number were rejected compared to previous years.

China has been in the top three countries for asylum approvals for the past 10 years.

Asylum seekers either apply to the Refugee Status Branch once they arrive in New Zealand, or UNHCR-mandated refugees are brought in under the Government refugee quota.

Among refugees who entered through the quota, Syria, Myanmar, Colombia and Afghanistan accounted for three quarters of last year's 1000-strong intake.

The quota will rise to 1500 refugees in 2020.

The most common settlement areas last year were Wellington with 246 refugees and Otago with 182.

Southland had its first 43 Colombian arrivals through the new settlement scheme there.

More than half of Wellington's quota refugees came from Syria and Iran.

No refugees were placed in Canterbury.

Christchurch needed more infrastructure rebuilding before it could become a suitable refugee settlement location again, Immigration New Zealand said last year.

About 20 quota refugees from Afghanistan and Eritrea will be resettled in the city in March next year, with 40 more in the rest of 2019.

There are now seven places where refugees are settled long-term in New Zealand: Auckland, Hamilton, Manawatū, Wellington, Nelson, Dunedin and Invercargill.

The government pulled back the number of quota refugees settling in Auckland in 2016, due to the lack of affordable housing.

Almost 300 were settled there in 2008 compared to 86 last year.

The Government is considering setting up additional settlement locations to accommodate the increase in refugees.

rnz.co.nz

New Zealand had a record number of asylum seekers last year. Source: rnz.co.nz

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Police name man killed in fatal Rotorua motorcycle crash

Police have released the name of the person who died in a motorcycle crash in Rotorua earlier this week.

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Police car Source: 1 NEWS

The man was 47-year-old Thomas Hunuhunu of Rotorua.

Police were called to a crash on Deven Street West around 2am on Thursday morning after a motorcycle collided with a tree.

The motorcycle was the only vehicle involved in the crash and the driver died at the scene.

The Serious Crash Unit is still investigating the fatal accident.

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Drug testing legalisation at NZ festivals on the cards

The Government is considering legalising drug-testing services at festivals.

A community organisation, Know Your Stuff, said the law hindered people's access to pill testing at events, which put users at risk.

Its managing director Wendy Allison said section 12 of the Misuse of Drugs Act made it a criminal offence to permit a venue to be used for drug consumption, so the presence of pill testing would demonstrate that the event organisers knew that people use drugs.

"Section 12 was never intended to prevent harm reduction services from happening at events."

"An unintended consequence of the Section has been to deter event organisers from providing harm reduction services such as pill testing, removing this barrier is an obvious step towards keeping people safe."

Health Minister David Clark said the coalition Government was dealing with drug use as a health and harm reduction issue.

"In light of this, I've had initial discussions with the Justice Minister about 'drug checking' services.

"Through him, I've asked for advice on the legislative and criminal justice issues around such services."

rnz.co.nz- Chris Bramwell

Johann Hari, who spent several years researching drug use, addiction and treatment for his book, says we’ve misunderstood addiction.
Source: 1 NEWS


Tertiary students tackle social, cultural and environmental issues in dazzling Auckland light show

Unitec Institute of Technology is using innovative electric vehicle technology to power students’ light installations at this year’s GLOW@Artweek festival on Devonport’s Windsor Reserve.

Unitec partnered with Auckland energy company Vector for the light show where installations by students look at different issues in society.

The festival also prides itself on being environmentally friendly, with energy being taken from two Nissan Leaf G2 electric cars to provide the power needed to run the nine different light projects.

The cars act as a rechargeable and mobile renewable energy source for the duration of the festival.

Vector’s New Technology Lead, Moonis Vegdani, says, “Two-way EV chargers are an example of the future of energy. They basically transform electric vehicles into mobile storage batteries, enabling energy to be charged or discharged anywhere there is a two-way charger. It’s perfect for a temporary light installation such as GLOW@Artweek.”

Nine teams of second-year Unitec Architecture students designed a diverse range of interactive light installations on Devonport’s Windsor Reserve for the event, working to a zero-waste, zero-budget brief.

Students sought sponsorship for their designs, which also featured a range of sustainable materials.

"Sustainability is a key factor in the design and construction of the students’ works and having access to an alternative, rechargeable power source in a large-scale outdoor venue is extremely exciting," Unitec Architecture lecturer Ainsley O'Connell said. 

Devonport came to life thanks to the work of Unitec architecture students in “Glow”. Source: 1 NEWS