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Seventy-year-old Canterbury multi-sport veteran takes on his biggest challenge to date

Aged seventy and recently retired, you could forgive multi-sport athlete Steve Moffat if he wanted to finally put his feet up after a long career.

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Steve Moffat took on the challenge of riding the equivalent of sea level to Everest. Source: 1 NEWS

The Cantabrian though had other ideas yesterday morning when he took on his biggest challenge to date.

The septuagenarian rose early to ride his bike up one of Lake Hawea’s steepest slopes more than a hundred times.

“I’m going to attempt to ride the vertical metres from sea level of Everest, which is 8849 metres,” he said before starting at 5am.

To eclipse the height of Everest, Moffat had to scale the hill 112 times. Each trip harder than the last and only split up with a brief ride back down hill to start again.

Around 6000 people worldwide have completed the challenge, only one of them though was aged over 70.

Moffat set his sights on beating the previous record in his age bracket of 36 hours, without any sleep breaks.

In true fashion, just beating that milestone wouldn’t be enough.

“He wants to smash the record and wants to make it really difficult for anyone else who wants to have a crack at it,” wife Barb said.

His wife’s prediction standing true, with Moffat crossing the line last night in a time of 14 hours and 53 minutes.

A very tired Moffat, relieved to finally put his feet up.

“I never want to do another one, but pretty happy with the time. We’ve had a fantastic day,” he said.

Steve completed the challenge to raise money for the Christchurch City Mission, along with the charity ‘City Rangers’, run by him and his daughter Jessy.

The charity helps troubled youths compete in the annual multi-sport event the Coast to Coast.

“I’m riding for one boy in particular that was having a hard time, in fact he was just about kicked out of the programme. He pulled himself together, ended up head boy at his school with a scholarship in engineering,” Steve said when speaking about the effect the programme has had on its students.

Steve today enjoying a well-earned rest, although don’t expect him to put his feet up for too long.

Anyone wanting to donate can do so here.