Seeing out the storm: Our Back to Basics Kiwi family is back to square one after garden turns to mud

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Our columnist Lydia Harvey - who is trying to live off her garden instead of the supermarket for a year - is among the thousands of people who have borne the brunt of Cyclone Debbie's last sting as it moves across the Tasman. With mass evacuations happening around them, the Harvey family have dug deep into the resources to help those affected as the supermarkets shelves empty.

It's been a long and sad few days for us. Like the rest of the country we have felt the full brunt of the tail end of Cyclone Debbie. It's not been easy for anybody!

The Harveys' garden is a pile of mud following the heavy downpours.

The Harveys' garden is a pile of mud following the heavy downpours.

Source: 1 NEWS

Our main garden took a direct hit and all that remains is mud puddles while our fruit trees have sustained damage.

Looking at the garden today, I had a cry and honestly felt that I wanted to give up.

I thought we were ready for winter, but this has set us back a bit.

A soaked Lydia ready to hand out food to those working to help those affected by flooding in Whanganui.

A soaked Lydia ready to hand out food to those working to help those affected by flooding in Whanganui.

Source: 1 NEWS

Our spirits took the biggest hit knowing how many hours of hard work had been undone with just a couple of hours' worth of rain.

Our saving grace being at least we still have a few things in the glass house and our sheltered raised gardens are doing OK.

But while our garden is a bit muddy, others have been evacuated from their homes and there are people pulling some long, hard hours to help those people.

The Harvey's garden took a big hit during this week's storm.

The Harvey's garden took a big hit during this week's storm.

Source: 1 NEWS

And we knew that thanks to our food prepping and storing techniques we had the resources to feed them.

Harvey family supply hot meals for teams helping those in need in Whanganui.

Harvey family supply hot meals for teams helping those in need in Whanganui.

Source: 1 NEWS

So that's what I spent the morning doing making pizza breads, cakes, slices in bulk and dropping them into the local council where it could be distributed among the helpers.

Supplies from the Harveys to teams working a very wet Whanganui.

Supplies from the Harveys to teams working a very wet Whanganui.

Source: 1 NEWS

Yes, we dipped heavily into our surplus to do this, but that's what it is there for – times of emergencies. Not just for us but also for those around us in times it is needed.

While the rain came down and people in their masses were heading to the local stores to try and get supplies, we had no need to go anywhere.

Lydia's friend sent through this picture of shelves emptying in their local supermarket following the floods.

Lydia's friend sent through this picture of shelves emptying in their local supermarket following the floods.

Source: 1 NEWS

Our resources and supplies are well stocked and stored and we had everything we needed with excess to redistribute.

Learning to live without the supermarket makes me reflect on how essential it is to be a little more aware on how fast things can change and how people would adapt if a larger scale event were to occur.

I know for us what we are doing has required us to learn so many things and at times like these I'm reminded just how important these skills can be.

But for now we're waiting for the sun to come out and head back into the garden to unfortunately start again.

Back to square one: Lydia gets her seeds out to replant all her vegetables which have washed away.

Back to square one: Lydia gets her seeds out to replant all her vegetables which have washed away.

Source: 1 NEWS

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