Remarkables ski field brought to a halt after fallen tree cuts power

A fallen tree in Arrowtown brought the Remarkables ski field grinding to a halt this morning while Delta reinstated electricity.

Diesel generators ensured people on the chairlifts were evacuated safely.

A fallen tree in Arrowtown brought activity to a grinding halt for around 20 minutes. Source: 1 NEWS

Power was out to the mountain for about twenty minutes. Arrowtown and Coronet Peak also faced power failure for a short time.

The current wintry weather brought 12cm of snow overnight, and another 3cm has fallen this morning.

Strong winds are gusting to about 50km at the top of the chairlifts.

The wild weather hasn't deterred skiers though, about 1200 people are skiing the mountain today.



Prince Charles recognises New Zealand police officers for 35 years of frontline service

Eleven officers were honoured by the Prince of Wales for work including special operations, prosecutions and United Nations missions. Source: 1 NEWS

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Video: Britten superbike boils over in front of hundreds during Christchurch gallery burnout

An art promotion went slightly awry when one of only 10 Britten V1000 superbikes in the world had a boil-over in front of a crowd of hundreds.

They were gathered to see the bike put through its paces on the forecourt of the Christchurch Art Gallery.

Crowds were gathered to see the Britten V1000 put through its paces but things went slightly awry. Source: 1 NEWS

The bike, one of the fastest in the world in its class, was designed by Christchurch entrepreneur John Britten and won a world championship in 1995.

Britten died that same year.

The gallery is staging an exhibition called "Great Britten" by one of the country's best known conceptual artists, Billy Apple. The exhibition opens on Saturday.

Today, to publicise the exhibition, the superbike, under the control of champion rider Andrew Stroud, looped the gallery and pulled in front of the crowd to "lay" a rubber skid-mark "B" on the forecourt.

They didn't quite get it all done though, with Stroud turning the bike off before the B was fully finished.

That's when water started to pour from the radiator system.

One of the organisers said the bike was designed for air cooling to assist when the engine is running at high revs and the static prolonged burnout tested the system and the bike "got a bit hot".

He said he believed there was no serious damage.