Police release name of 17-year-old girl found dead in suspected South Auckland homicide

Police say that Demetrius Pairama was the name of the teenage girl found dead at a vacant property on Buckland Road in Māngere last Sunday.

Detective Inspector Tofilau Faa Vaaelua says police are still working to establish all of the circumstances surrounding her death.

Police confirm no one has been charged at this stage.

Demetrius, 17, is believed to have died during the day on Saturday.

The girl was found dead at the weekend, and police have since launched a homicide investigation. Source: 1 NEWS



Euthanasia activist, previously convicted of aiding mum's suicide in NZ, now charged with murder in South Africa

A New Zealand man who was convicted of assisting his mother's suicide has been charged with pre-meditated murder in South Africa.
Sean Davison was arrested and charged on Monday after he helped his quadriplegic friend Anrich Burger die in 2013.

Professor Davison is an academic at the University of the Western Cape and a prominent right-to-die campaigner who co-founded Dignity South Africa, an organisation whose mission is to legalise euthanasia in that country.

In 2006 he helped his terminally-ill Dunedin-based mother to die, which he admitted in draft versions of a book he subsequently wrote, called Before We Say Goodbye.

Patricia Davison died hours after drinking a cocktail of crushed up morphine tablets prepared by her son.

It will take over a year for MPS to hear from 3500 New Zealanders who want their voices heard. Source: 1 NEWS

In 2011 he was sentenced to five months' home detention for that crime.

In 2014 he told South African media Mr Burger had been in extreme pain and was desperate to die and he was helping him out of compassion.

Mr Davison was arrested on Monday local time and held overnight and is now out on bail.

His next court appearance will be in November and his lawyer said the police may lay further charges against him.

rnz.co.nz

Euthanasia campaigner Sean Davison is now accused of helping end the life of a doctor who became quadriplegic. Source: 1 NEWS

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Disturbing new study finds Kiwi teens are fatter and less fit than their parents

Today's teens are more fat and less fit than their parents' generation, according to disturbing new research out of the University of Otago.

The first-of-its-kind study, published today in the New Zealand Medical Journal, measured the fitness of 343 15-year-olds whose parents had been tested in the 1980s. Each generation was tested on an exercise cycle.

"We have seen a 25 per cent decline in fitness in girls compared to their mothers and about a 15 per cent decline in fitness compared to their fathers," researcher Helena McAnally told TVNZ1's Breakfast this morning, explaining that the findings are unlikely to be unique to New Zealand.

"I think there's been a lot of social change over the years between the Dunedin study in the 80s, when they were 15, and now," she explained. "We're looking at increasing levels of physical inactivity in developed countries across the globe."

The downward trend is a concern, she said.

"Historically, we've been seeing health and wellbeing tracking towards more positive outcomes," she said. "This is looking like this generation is going to be less healthy than their parents' generation.

"Poorer fitness now could potentially lead to long term health problems later."

Professor Bob Hancox, who led the study, said in a statement that the findings fit the perception many of us already had of young people being outside less and tethered to screens more than any generation previously.

But Ms McAnally said today she remains optimistic that the situation could change. As happened with smoking, studies about the health implications could help prompt government initiatives that eventually see healthier outcomes.

The $7 million plan to tackle the fat is being deemed too weak. Source: 1 NEWS

She suggested ad campaigns and increased opportunities for people to be active.

"I know in Australia some schools have an afternoon dedicated to physical activity so that people don't have to organise taking their kids to sports outside of school hours," she said. "So there are things like that we could change that would be systematically embedding physical activity in young people's day-to-day routines.

"Investing in the health and wellbeing of our young people now is going to save money in the long term, so I think it's a sensible move."

Researchers tested the 15-year-old children of teens who were studied in the 1980s, researcher Helena McAnally explained to Breakfast. Source: Breakfast

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Murder charge laid after man stabbed to death in Upper Hutt

A murder charge has been laid after a man was stabbed to death in Upper Hutt yesterday.

A 37-year-old man will appear in the Hutt Valley District Court this morning, Detective Inspector John van den Heuvel said in a statement.

The incident took place on Golders Rd, Upper Hutt, yesterday afternoon.

Police believe it was an isolated incident and aren't looking for anyone else.

Police car
Police car Source: 1 NEWS

The victim died at the scene.


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Labour MPs stand behind Jacinda Ardern's decision to strip Meka Whaitiri of her portfolios

Meka Whaitiri will be expected back at Parliament next week despite the prime minister stripping her of her ministerial portfolios yesterday.

Jacinda Ardern said she had lost confidence in the Ikaroa-Rawhiti MP on the back of an investigation into an altercation with her press secretary at an event in Gisborne in August.

Jacinda Ardern. (Richard Tindiller) Source: rnz.co.nz

Ms Ardern has seen the final report - on which she's based her decision to strip Ms Whaitiri of her portfolios - but the public will have to wait until the Department of Internal Affairs (DIA) has been through it before they get to see it.

She will not say what happened, only that Ms Whaitiri still disputes the allegation against her.

But Ms Ardern has promised some of that detail will be released in due course.

"I've asked DIA to prepare a version of the report that can be released in order to address some of those outstanding questions."

Ms Whaitiri's associate portfolios in agriculture, Crown-Māori relations, forestry and local government will all fall to lead ministers.

Mana MP Kris Faafoi, who recently became the Minister of Broadcasting when Clare Curran resigned from Cabinet, will pick up the full customs portfolio.

It avoids a full Cabinet reshuffle.

Ms Ardern said she would work with Ms Whaitiri to address her staffing matters, but made it clear no other formal grievances had been laid.

"I'm going to work with the member, at this point we are talking more about managing employees.

"Support through training and so on, human resource management."

Ms Whaitiri remains an electorate MP and will keep her role as co-chair of Labour's Māori caucus.

Fellow co-chair Willie Jackson could not be reached for comment, but one of its members, Labour MP Paul Eagle, said he was pleased remained at the helm.

"She's certainly served her weight in gold over the last 11 months, and I'd hope to see her stay."

Senior Cabinet Minister Andrew Little backed the Ms Ardern's call on the matter.

"I haven't seen the report but what I do know of Jacinda Ardern is that she is scrupulously fair, she has waited until she's obviously had information and has made her judgement and I stand with her on that."

Labour MPs Ginny Anderson and Greg O'Connor agreed.

Green MP Gareth Hughes felt for his Parliamentary colleague.

"There's always the personal reaction, and I feel sorry for her as an individual. Obviously though the decision was one for [the] prime minister."

In Napier, in the heart of the Ikaroa-Rawhiti electorate, many voters said they remained supportive of Ms Whaitiri. Others backed Ms Ardern.

By Gia Garrick

rnz.co.nz

The Prime Minister says she took action after an investigation deemed an incident did happen. Source: 1 NEWS