Photos: Sneak peek at the 25 new KiwiBuild homes announced today for Auckland's Onehunga

Construction on 25 new KiwiBuild apartments in the Auckland suburb of Onehunga starts today. And balloting for the highly sought after dwellings begins next week, officials announced this morning.

Apartments priced up to $600,000 are available, but the opposition says it’s not the kind of housing families want. Source: 1 NEWS

"This is a unique opportunity for those who have been locked out of the property market to buy a modern, new home in an increasingly popular area that might otherwise have been out of reach for first home buyers," Housing Minister Phil Twyford said in a statement.

An artist's rendering of the @340 Onehunga KiwiBuild development planned for Auckland.
An artist's rendering of the @340 Onehunga KiwiBuild development planned for Auckland.

The homes, which are expected to take a year to build, include six studio apartments, 12 one-bedroom apartments and seven two-bedroom apartments. They will range in price from $380,000 to $600,000, and include washer/dryers and dishwashers – "high quality fittings" described by Mr Twyford as "often hidden costs for first home buyers".

The Government has set a goal of building 10,000 KiwiBuild homes, targeting first time homebuyers or people deemed
"second chancers", by June 2021.

The planned interior for apartments at @340 Onehunga KiwiBuild, a new KiwiBuild development in Auckland.
The planned interior for apartments at @340 Onehunga KiwiBuild, a new KiwiBuild development in Auckland.

Earlier this week, the ballot began for the first 18 homes in Auckland – stand-alone dwellings in Papakura selling for $579,000 for three bedrooms and $649,000 for four bedrooms.

The 18 homes at the McLennan development in Papakura will be sold through a ballot. Source: 1 NEWS

"Our Government is opening the door to families locked out of home ownership by building affordable starter homes where the market failed to do so," Prime Minister said earlier this week.

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For more on this story, watch 1 NEWS at 6pm. Source: 1 NEWS

The latest development, named @340 Onehunga, has been praised for its central location and it's proximity to public transportation – including a planned light rail route.

Open days at 340 Onehunga Mall begin this weekend. They will remain open from 11am to 2pm daily until the ballot closes on 15 October.

Those who win the ballot will be required to pay a 10 per cent deposit while the homes are being built. Only those who have an income of less than $120,000 for a single buyer, or no more than $180,000 for more than one purchaser, are eligible.

An artist's rendering of @340 Onehunga apartments, a KiwiBuild project in Auckland.

They must also be a New Zealand citizen or permanent resident, or a resident visa holder who is "ordinarily resident in New Zealand" and must intend to own and live in the home as their primary place of residence for at least three years.

Construction has started on 25 apartments in Auckland’s Onehunga. Source: 1 NEWS



Water meters likely for all New Zealand households in the future, expert says

New Zealand may be blessed with a plentiful supply of fresh water, but our system for getting it to our taps leaves a lot to be desired.

In places like Wellington, our pipe system has a water leakage rate of roughly 15 to 20 per cent, Water New Zealand CEO John Pfahlert told TVNZ1's Breakfast today.

"It's a fairly aging piping network, quite leaky," he said, adding that the situation isn't any different in "many, many communities" throughout Aotearoa. "You compare that, for example, to places like the Netherlands where you'd probably have less than 3 per cent leakage - a much higher investment in their reticulation network."

And as scientists predict more extreme weather events in coming decades, including extreme drought, that inefficiency paired with our "excessive consumption" throughout the country will have big consequences if we don't prepare for it now, he predicted.

Mr Pfahlert's warnings come as a report in Wellington suggests demand for water there will outstrip supply by 2040 if residents keep consuming at their current rate.

While replacing the piping networks throughout New Zealand is expensive, there is one way to dramatically cut down our consumption, Mr Pfahlert said. Install water meters and charge for it.

The measure is already in place in Auckland, where it costs about $1.80 per cubic metre of water.

"When those meters were introduced, there was an immediate reduction in water consumption by people of about 30 per cent," he said.

"When they did the same thing on the Kapiti Coast a few years ago, they were facing the necessity to build a water treatment plant at a cost of something like $50 million," he added. "They installed water meters, and (there was) an immediate 30 per cent drop in consumption in water by locals.

"It does drive behaviour."

There has been some opposition to installing meters in Wellington, with fears - unfounded, officials say - that it could lead to privatisation of the water supply. But the measure seems inevitable, not just for Wellington but for all of New Zealand, Mr Pfahlert told Breakfast.

"As we approach a world where the weather's going to be drier, I suspect it's going to be something that most communities are forced to do," he said. "It just makes good common sense. It's not only a means of conserving water, it's just a good way to behave in terms of treating the environment."

Our water supply might be abundant, but our pipe systems are inefficient and leaky, says Water NZ CEO John Pfahlert. Source: Breakfast

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Greenpeace wants Government to use funds for solar panels instead of oil and gas

Greenpeace is calling on the Government to kit out New Zealand homes with solar panels by using the funds currently subsidising the oil and gas industry.

Earlier this year the Government banned offshore exploration, and Greenpeace said the $88 million used to subsidise it could be used for solar panels and batteries for 1.5 million New Zealand homes over the next ten years.

Greenpeace climate and energy campaigner Amanda Larsson said a report on the future of energy from the national grid operator showed that energy systems were increasingly shifting to electricity, and she said that meant New Zealand needed to increase the amount of electricity that was produced.

"One of their forecasts is that 1.5 million households will need to go solar, and what we're saying is that it's time to kick start that right away by getting 500,000 homes kitted out with panels and batteries over ten years," she said.

Going solar would be financially beneficial for homeowners who would not have to deal with any upfront costs and would provide zero interest loans, she said.

"The plan would provide additional support to 100,000 lower income homes through a Government grant that would cover at least half the system cost. The zero interest loans would be attached to the house that receives the solar panels and batteries, not to the individuals who own it or rent it. They could be administered through Regional Councils, and paid back through rates."

The plan was launched yesterday as the organisation's flagship, Rainbow Warrior, arrived in Auckland to celebrate the Government's April announcement banning offshore oil and gas permits.

rnz.co.nz

Solar Panels Source: 1 NEWS

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Dying patients with rare chemotherapy reaction paying for own drugs

Dying patients who suffer a rare reaction to chemotherapy are having to pay for their own drugs because their cases are not considered exceptional.

A 50-year-old Auckland woman, Patricia Tear, a sole caregiver to children aged 9 and 11, was diagnosed with bowel cancer last year.

She had surgery followed by chemo but suffered from cardio-toxicity from the chemo drug, known as 5-FU.

It recurred in a second attempt and doctors decided it was too risky to repeat.

Instead they applied to drug-buyer Pharmac for access under an exceptional circumstances scheme to an alternative, unfunded drug - raltitrexed, brand name Tomudex.

That was declined as Ms Tear was not considered truly exceptional. Instead, Pharmac said Ms Tear would be part of a wider group who, when exposed to the 5-FU drugs, would develop heart pain or toxicity. It added they should be considered for funding under the regular method, listing on the Pharmaceutical Schedule, but that's not currently available.

It's left Ms Tear feeling abandoned by the health system. "Up the creek without a paddle as far as I'm concerned. I'm one of the ones that have just been sent home, forgotten about."

She lives at home with her children while under hospice care, and doesn't know how long she'll have left: "I don't know, two years maybe, at the most."

Wellington woman Janet McMenamin, who's a fit 71-year-old, was also diagnosed unexpectedly with bowel cancer three months ago. It was aggressive and has spread to her liver. She also applied unsuccessfully to Pharmac's Named Patient Pharmaceutical Assessment, or NPPA, exceptional circumstances scheme. Similarly to Ms Tear, Ms McMenamin suffered cardiac chest pain, similar to a heart attack, when she went on two different kinds of chemo.

She said the condition is rare at one patient in a thousand, but even so she was refused funded Tomudex. She and her partner Bob Cijffers are paying $4000 a month to get it privately from Bowen Icon Cancer Centre every three weeks, to buy time for Ms McMenamin. About half of that amount was for the drug itself and the remainder for costs associated with having it administered in a private hospital, because of the lack of public funding for the drug.

"It's not a cure," Ms McMenamin said. "It's to make me as comfortable as they can and to extend my life as long as they can."

The couple say say it is discriminatory and unfair that patients like them can afford the drug privately, but that others, like Ms Tear, cannot.

"Pharmac is saying it's no longer an unusual circumstance and therefore they will be applying to put it on the official list of medicines that will be funded," Mr Cijffers said. "This process unfortunately will take at least two years and will not be of any use to Janet or Patricia or anybody else who's in the same position."

Cancer Society medical director Chris Jackson said it was leaving patients in this category "in the lurch".

"We don't know how long that will take. For many cancer drugs that is years, and unfortunately people do not have years to wait when they have cancer because people will literally be dead by the time the process is complete. And people are dying while they are waiting for Pharmac to go through these slow machinations and bureaucratic considerations."

Pharmac records show eight patients received funding under the NPPA exceptional circumstances scheme between 1 March 2012 and 31 August 2017.

Pharmac would not comment on Ms Tear's case but said it had received an application for raltitrexed to be funded for bowel cancer patients who are intolerant or unable to take the fluoropyrimidine treatment because of cardiac toxicity.

"We're not able to provide a timeframe for when the application for raltitrexed will be progressed for funding but further details will be posted on our Application Tracker as this application progresses."

Health Minister David Clark said he felt for Patricia Tear and her family. "However, as Health Minister it is not appropriate for me to intervene in individual cases. We can't have politicians second-guessing clinicians."

He said he was advised that the Auckland District Health Board, which had been overseeing Ms Tear's care, was doing its best to treat and support her.

By Karen Brown

rnz.co.nz

Cancer patient Patricia Tear with son Riley, 9,and Ruby, 11. (Photo: Karen Brown) Source: rnz.co.nz


SBW, Ryan Crotty among host of All Blacks stars returning to face the Springboks

Strike weapons Beauden Barrett and Rieko Ioane are back in an All Blacks team looking to wrap up the Rugby Championship when they face South Africa in Wellington on Saturday.

Coach Steve Hansen has made nine personnel changes and a positional switch to his experimental starting team that saw off Argentina 46-24 in Nelson.

A fourth bonus point win from four matches would guarantee a third straight Rugby Championship crown for the world champions with two rounds of matches still to play.

Few would bet against it given the Springboks are coming off successive losses on the road and haven't won in New Zealand for nine years.

It hasn't stopped Hansen naming close to his strongest available team.

Barrett returns at five-eighth in place of Richie Mo'unga, in a first appearance since his four-try, 30-point haul against Australia at Eden Park.

One more Barrett try would give him 24 in the No.10 jersey, matching the world record set by his All Blacks predecessor Dan Carter.

Tryscoring specialist Ioane returns to the left wing, having recovered from a hamstring problem.

Six backline positions have new faces with Ben Smith the only player retained, although he moves to the right wing, with Jordie Barrett restored at fullback.

The halves and centres are both overhauled. Aaron Smith is halfback and Anton Lienert-Brown the outside centre while inside centre Ryan Crotty returns from a month on the sideline following a concussion early in the opening Bledisloe Cup Test in Sydney.

There is a place on the bench for Sonny Bill Williams, whose recuperation from a shoulder injury stretches back nearly three months.

Up front is more settled.

First-choice flankers Sam Cane and Liam Squire are recalled while Luke Whitelock replaces fellow lock veteran Brodie Retallick, who is injured.

Barrett carried the bottles for the team against the Pumas and said he learned from the experience. Source: 1 NEWS

The other lock is Scott Barrett, who will start alongside brothers Jordie and Beauden.

Whitelock's return means three centurions are in a battle-hardened pack, alongside Owen Franks and captain Kieran Read.

Forwards Patrick Tuipulotu and Liam Coltman have won rare selections, both on the bench.

ALL BLACKS: Jordie Barrett, Ben Smith, Anton Lienert-Brown, Ryan Crotty, Rieko Ioane, Beauden Barrett, Aaron Smith, Kieran Read (capt), Sam Cane, Liam Squire, Scott Barrett, Sam Whitelock, Owen Franks, Codie Taylor, Karl Tu'inukuafe. Res: Liam Coltman, Tim Perry, Ofa Tuungafasi, Patrick Tuipulotu, Ardie Savea, TJ Perenara, Sonny Bill Williams, Damian McKenzie.

Sonny Bill Williams and Ryan Crotty during the warm-up.
New Zealand All Blacks v Australian Wallabies. Bledisloe Cup and Rugby Championship test match. Eden Park, Auckland, New Zealand. Saturday 25 August 2018. © Copyright photo: Andrew Cornaga / www.Photosport.nz
All Blacks midfielders Sonny Bill Williams and Ryan Crotty during the warm-up. Source: Photosport


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