One pie to rule them all! Meet the baker behind New Zealand's champion pie

The secret behind New Zealand's top pie? Good filling and great pastry.

That combo helped the owner of a Taupo bakery take home the title of New Zealand's top pie with his venison, bacon, mushroom and cheese delicacy. 

"It is a big seller," said creator Lee Ing of Taupo's Fast & Fresh Bakery. 

Mr Ing treated TVNZ1's Breakfast team to the pie, which took out the nationwide competition at the Bakels' Pie Awards last night. 

It comes at a modest price of $4.90, which Mr Ing says will not change, despite its new status. 

He said the most important part of a pie is the filling, "but for the [awards] entry, the pastry". 

"If the pastry isn't right, you haven't got a chance to get into the final."

The pie took out a Gold Award in the Gourmet Meat section, before going on to win the overall award. 

Last year, Mr Ing received a 'Highly Commended' for the same section, and a Bronze Award for steak and cheese. 

Mushroom, cheese and bacon are also in Lee Ing's award-winning Taupo pie. Source: Breakfast



Weekend's most read: Pregnant women refusing prenatal care after children taken by social services

This story was first published on Sunday September 16.

More than 6000 children are in the care of Oranga Tamaraki – a 22 per cent increase from six years ago. Source: 1 NEWS

Health professionals say women whose children have been taken by social services are refusing to seek prenatal care when they fall pregnant for fear of having their newborns taken, too.

One Kaitaia couple, Mary and Warren, had their first child taken into care by social services because of domestic violence and mental health problems.

Mary believes social services' decision to remove their child from their care was fair at the time, but she claims they "also said that I'd be able to get him back and that I'd get a house in six months".

When Mary became pregnant for a second time, it was six months before she sought prenatal care.

Mary and Warren's fears were realised when their second child was taken from them at birth, with Oranga Tamariki saying their baby was at risk.

"I just cried and wouldn't give her to them. The nurse actually had to take her off me," she said.

The couple's children are among more than 6000 New Zealand kids under the care of Oranga Tamariki this year – a 22 per cent increase on the number of children in care six years ago.

The agency says it only takes such drastic action when there are concerns of a serious nature, and only when all other options have been explored.

However, Northland midwife Colleen Brown is concerned the move is putting pregnant mothers off seeking help.

"There is no way, unless you are gonna go bush and have your pepe (baby), that you are gonna keep that pepe," Ms Brown said.

1 NEWS has spoken to several pregnant mothers who are considered at risk.

Some are expecting mothers who would like help with their drug and alcohol abuse but have not reached out for help out of fear of losing their children. Some have children who have already been removed from their care.

But Oranga Tamariki says those who do not seek help are putting their babies at further risk.

Deanne 'Dee' McManus-Emery, the regional manager for Oranga Tamariki South Auckland, says, "We are hearing stories from our families that we do know, but we're also hearing it from our community organisations, colleagues and also our health providers".

"What we're trying to do is work in partnership with those providers, ensuring that there is a jointed approach to ensure the right support services are wrapped around them," Ms McManus-Emery explained.

"We certainly would want families to be accessing their prenatal care because that gives children the best start in life."

Ms Brown is urging mothers with fears of losing their child "to take ownership of it" and get the help they need.

"They need to come forward because there is help available for them," she said.

Mary and Warren visit their children twice a week and are working with social agencies to get them back permanently.

"I'd like our kids back. I’d like to be given a chance," Warren said.

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Jacinda Ardern outlines Government's top 12 priorities for New Zealand over next 30 years

The Prime Minister has announced 12 priorities as part of a 30-year plan that will be a focus of the Government's ongoing work.

Jacinda Ardern outlined the plan during a speech in Auckland today.

"The Coalition Government’s long-term plan is a blueprint which sets out our priorities and the steps we are taking to build a more modern and fairer New Zealand that we can all be proud of," says Ms Ardern.

"This plan represents our shared vision and priorities; Labour, New Zealand First and the Greens. It establishes the foundation for the Government’s work and includes issues of particular importance to each of the parties which are supported by all of them.

"Our Government has a firm eye on the future. That's why our plan is looking 30 years ahead, not just three."

The Government's 12 priorities are: 

- To grow and share more fairly New Zealand's prosperity

- Supporting thriving and sustainable regions

- Transitioning to a clean, green carbon neutral New Zealand

- Delivering responsible government with a broader measure of success

- Ensuring that everyone is either earning, learning, caring or volunteering

- Supporting healthier, safer and more connected communities

- Ensuring everyone has a warm, dry home

- Making New Zealand the best place in the world to be a child

- Committing to deliver transparent, transformative, and compassionate government

- Building closer partnerships with Māori

- Valuing who we are as a country

- Creating an international reputation we can be proud of

The Prime Minister gave details of the Government plan during a speech in Auckland. Source: 1 NEWS

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SH1 Desert Road closed after stock truck rolls

Part of the North Island's Desert Road  (SH1) has been closed after a stock truck rolled today.

Emergency services were called to the scene near Paradise Valley Road at 1.10pm.

The truck driver was uninjured following the incident but cattle are on the road.

A vet is in attendance to attend to the animals.

Diversions are in place and motorists have been asked to avoid the area and delay travel if possible.

The road is expected to closed for some time while the scene is cleared.

A road closure sign in front of a Police vehicle
A road closure sign in front of a Police vehicle. Source: 1 NEWS


Canterbury engineer hopes to quake-proof buildings with old tyres

A University of Canterbury team is a million dollars closer to its goal of developing quake-proof building foundations from old tyres.

The money from the Endeavour Fund, administered by the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment, will go to researching new foundation systems for low-rise homes and buildings.

The project's science leader said waste tyres were an affordable source of building materials that could be adapted for wider use.

Gabriele Chiaro, a senior engineering lecturer at Canterbury University, said 3.5 million used tyres were sent to landfills or dumped each year in New Zealand.

"This gives rise to stockpiles of tyres that cause enormous environmental issues."

Mr Chiaro and his team planned to use them to create what was described as an "eco-rubber, seismic-isolation foundation system" for buildings throughout the country.

It is a system that filters the energy of an earthquake by combining two critical elements: A rubber-gravel mixture that disperses seismic shock waves and a flexible "raft" foundation made of steel fibre-reinforced rubberised concrete, that does not crack like regular concrete.

The system would not only absorb the shock, but also prevent damage, Mr Chiaro said.

There were similar studies elsewhere in the world, but mainly in countries that did not have the same earthquake risk.

"In New Zealand we are trying to assess the problem of tyre waste management, and by doing so we are also able to minimise the seismic damage for medium-density, low-height residential buildings."

He said the development was aimed for use in housing developments, which was where a gap existed in earthquake strengthening, but the technology could also be used in small-scale commercial developments.

Mr Chiaro said preliminary studies were done in 2015, which revealed the potential for development. A prototype could be ready within two years before laboratory testing was done, and field trials could be expected within five years.

"After than, we anticipate that in 10 years' time this foundation will be used in most of the buildings built in New Zealand."

Mr Chiaro did not think it would be hard convincing regulatory authorities of its merits, provided it was affordable and resilient.

The $1m Endeavour Fund is New Zealand's largest contestable research fund, aimed at ambitious research projects to improve the lives of New Zealanders.

Mr Chiaro expected the project to attract interest.

"There is potential for great collaboration with Japan and the USA, with whom we already have a connection, and also with Europe."

By Tracy Neal

rnz.co.nz

Gabriele Chiaro, a senior engineering lecturer at Canterbury University, said 3.5 million used tyres were sent to landfills or dumped each year in New Zealand.
Gabriele Chiaro, a senior engineering lecturer at Canterbury University, said 3.5 million used tyres were sent to landfills or dumped each year in New Zealand. Source: University of Canterbury