TODAY |

NZ Rugby accepts help from women's advocates after Chiefs stripper scandal

New Zealand Rugby has been forced into damage control over the Chiefs' stripper scandal after more graphic details of her claims were aired.

The stripper named Scarlette wants to leave the issue behind her. 

And while New Zealand Rugby may want the same thing, it's been forced into some serious soul searching after the release of the new details of the stripper's claims about what happened at the Chiefs' end-of-season party. 

Radio New Zealand released more audio from an interview with her last month, including claims the players threw gravel at her, touched her genitalia, and attempted to pull out their penises.

New Zealand Rugby chief executive Steve Tew says none of these claims were substantiated in its investigation.

"The players have already said that they're sorry for what they have caused. And I think we can all say that I - think the whole game I'm the representative of it - the game is very sorry that we're in this position," Tew said.

But he has been doing some thinking on the issue.

"We're obviously not where we want to be in terms of the culture of the game. Attitudes to women are really important to us and frankly we're not where we would like to be," Tew said.

So the organisation is accepting help from sexual violence advocates to see how it can improve.

New Zealand Rugby's investigation came in for criticism from a raft of high-profile Kiwi women for being an inside job, which cleared the Chiefs players of any wrongdoing.