Motorcyclist scolds woman reading while driving on Auckland motorway

Go-pro footage of a woman reading a book while driving on one of Auckland's main highways has sparked interest online and a warning from police. 

The woman in the video, which was posted to the Highway Express Truck NZ Facebook page yesterday, can be seen reading while driving on the Northern Motorway, which has a speed limit of 100km per hour.

The motorcyclist does a double take when he sees this and decides to slow down and confront her.

Once he's positioned his bike next to her car, he toots his horn and shouts "Put that f**** s*** away."

Oddly enough, members of the Facebook page weren't surprised by the woman's behaviour and commented how they see this all too often.

"Things we see on the motorway. I've seen plenty reading books/newspapers, folding washing, doing makeup, filling out a form the list goes on," commented one person. 

Another said "Sadly, it's all too common."

Senior Sergeant Brett Henshaw said it is important that all drivers drive without distraction, reports the NZ Herald.

"Nobody wants to share the road with a driver who isn't paying full attention. It just takes one person, being distracted for one second, to potentially cause a life-changing crash," he said.

Senior Sergeant Henshaw said the footage has been referred to the Road Policing team for review and further action where appropriate.

Anyone who witnesses dangerous driving behaviour is encouraged to report it immediately to the police via 111. Other traffic offences can be reported on *555.


Topics

MOST
POPULAR STORIES


Bug in IT system used to count euthanasia bill submission costs taxpayers $75,000

A bug in an IT system used to count submissions to the controversial euthanasia bill ended up costing $75,000 to find 700 missing forms.

There were an un-precedented 37,000 submissions to the End of Life Bill and more than half were hard copies and had to be manually scanned in.

During that process 700 went missing and a consultant was brought in to find them and make sure no more got lost.

William Devos from the Office of the Clerk said it was a massive task involving multiple searches on different databases.

The $75,000 cost included a $10,000 audit, $45,000 for the consultant and $20,000 for two temporary staff.

Mr Devos said the bug itself took only $3500 to fix.

The IT system was developed by Parliamentary Service and has only been in use since late last year.

rnz.co.nz

Mr Seymour, author of the End of Life Choice Bill, debated the pros and cons with Dr Peter Thirkell of the Care Alliance, which opposes euthanasia.
Source: 1 NEWS

TODAY'S
TOP STORIES

Snow in the deep south, rain and gales forecast for central New Zealand

The wintry blast that brought snow to high country areas of the South Island overnight is set to sweep up the country with gales and heavy rain.

Snow fell in high country areas of Otago and Southland overnight, closing roads.

MetService says snow fell down to 200m in Southland.

State Highway 94 between Te Anau and Milford is closed from Hollyford Road because of snow and a rising avalance risk, and is likely to remain closed until midday.

MetService forecaster Heath Gullery said the cold weather system wasn't over yet.

Heavy rain warnings and watches are in place for north west Nelson, the ranges of Buller and the Richmond Range.

Mr Gullery said Up to 100mm of rain could fall in north-west Nelson.

Gales of more than 90 km/h are also expected for the Kaikoura coast and in Wellington.

Yesterday, temperatures dropped rapidly as the front moved up the South Island.

rnz.co.nz

This was a delight for locals as a cold snap hit the lower South Island today. Source: 1 NEWS

TODAY'S
FEATURED STORIES

Motorcyclist dies after crashing into tree in Rotorua

A motorcyclist has died in a crash in Rotorua this morning.

Police were called to the crash at 1.51am.

The motorcycle was the only vehicle involved and the driver died at the scene after colliding with a tree.

The Serious Crash Unit is investigating.
 

Police car generic.
Police car generic. Source: 1 NEWS


Auckland church helping influx of homeless with mental health problems

An Auckland church providing housing for the homeless for more than a decade has had an influx of people dealing with poor mental health.

Faith Family Baptist Church in Panmure offers a 13-week programme to rehouse people in need.

Numeracy and literacy classes, and assistance with addiction and health were also included.

Church kaumātua Tom Ngapera said they had been putting a roof over people's heads for a while.

"We've been focusing on housing since 2005 but only on a small scale.

"But now, it's going to be here for a while 'til anybody gets their act together and start putting houses out there so that these people can get there."

About 15 people stay at the church and its buildings at any given time and tenants pay $200 a week for board, power and water.

Food was officially included and there was communal cooking and food donations.

Senior pastor Carla Perese said most people who came through ended up staying longer than 13 weeks but the church's aim is to provide transitional housing.

She said one lady had been there for two years and as part of getting people back on their feet it was important to find accommodation.

"We need the best care for her that we can get so that she can be able to have that self-worth of having her own home, living in her own house and having her own carers going through there.

"She can't have that here because of all the people who live here - there's that quality of life."

But Ms Perese said what the church did was more than just finding people a place to stay.

Housing coordinator Jason Tai said in recent months a lot of people had arrived with mental health problems.

That made it difficult to find out basic information.

"A lot of them don't even have identification, they don't have a bank account, they don't have driver licenses, 18-plus cards, anything like that."

Mr Tai said knowing how to communicate and support people struggling with their mental health could be tough.

"Not [being] professional social workers or anything like that, we engage with the people, we track them and we try and make the best decisions from there so sometimes it [can be] challenging."

It was about balancing their care with others also staying at the church.

But in all the years the church had tenants there was been only one incident where there were safety concerns.

Ms Perese was investigating which services they could get for tenants with mental health problems.

"If things go out of hand, if people start rising up, we just call the police because we can't deal with that.

"But a few days ago I did have a meeting with organisations just to talk about that and what support we can get in here."

Jesse Chiang

rnz.co.nz

Homeless person (file picture).
File picture. Source: Supplied