Most read: Samoan family heartbroken after losing two babies to rare genetic condition following MMR jabs - 'Living the nightmare all over again'

As Samoans grieve for two infants who died within minutes of receiving the MMR vaccine, another mourning family has come forward after two of their babies also died after being immunised.

Grieving parents Karl and Christine Laulu lost their babies, Alana-Rae and Jamie Ray, shortly after they received the MMR vaccine in Samoa.

"Children are supposed to be the ones that put their parents to rest but in our case, it’s both of them. We have been so unfortunate to have this happen," Mr Laulu told 1 NEWS' Pacific correspondent Barbara Dreaver. 

Alana-Rae died in April at Starship Hospital after being medivacced to New Zealand from Samoa.

Her brother, Jamie Ray, died two years ago.

Both children deteriorated steadily after receiving the MMR vaccine in Samoa.

"He was in so much pain. I told him everything is going to be OK, we're just going to fix this then go home," Mr Laulu said.

However, Jamie Ray never made it home after high fevers led to massive organ failure.

Doctors suspected typhoid, sepsis and dengue, but "there was never the conclusion that it was the MMR shot", Ms Laulu said.

"That's why we never linked it until Alana-Rae."

After Alana-Rae was immunised, she developed the same symptoms as her brother.

"It was like living the nightmare all over again for a second time," she said.

Starship Hospital specialists discovered she possibly had a life-threatening immunodeficiency, and it was likely her brother did, too.

"Once the MMR injection was given to them, their bodies went into hypodrive and that's not supposed to happen," Mr Laulu said.

The extremely rare disorder affects one in a million children.

However, despite the tragedies, the couple don't blame anyone for what happened to their two babies, even thanking the Samoan government and medical services in Samoa and New Zealand for their help.

They do, however, want answers, and remain in New Zealand as they wait for the results of genetic testing.

"We wont be able to get that back in Samoa. There's no resources for them to help us," Ms Laulu said.

"I don't think we have the strength to go back and pick up the millions and millions of pieces," Mr Laulu said.

The Laulus have come forward after hearing about the recent deaths.

"It's just sad that we had to hear that another two families have to go through the same thing without knowing why.”

*The MMR vaccine is recommended for all children in New Zealand, and the Ministry of Health says it has an “excellent safety record”.

Alana-Rae and Jamie Ray Laulu are thought to have had a life-threatening immunodeficiency that affects one in a million children. Source: 1 NEWS



'My god she can run' - woman at centre of hilarious Kawakawa dog escape video says Lily is enjoying her 15 minutes of fame

A Bay of Islands woman told TVNZ1's Seven Sharp she is "never going to live this down" after footage of her rescue dog Lily dragging a bakery's flag down the main street of Kawakawa went viral around the globe.

CCTV footage of the freedom-seeking furball's runner — accompanied by Yakety Sax, the song made famous by the Benny Hill Show — has been viewed more than 500,000 times since it was posted to Facebook last night.

Lucie Green, a volunteer with Bay of Islands Animal Rescue, was taking the basset hound for a walk last week when she decided to stop at a local business to buy Lily a treat.

But the Basset Hound received a fright and bolted despite being tied to a large Coca-Cola flag forcing Lucie to give chase.

"For an animal with just little legs, my god she can run," Lucie told Seven Sharp.

Lily, Lucie and the rogue flag brought Kawakawa's State Highway 1 strip to a standstill, the whole escapade captured on CCTV.

"My partner owns a local CCTV company I got to the office and I told him what had happened.

"He didn't tell me he'd done it, but he edited footage and put the music on and uploaded it to Facebook and tagged me in it.

"I knew it was trouble when basically by the time we'd gone to bed last night it had hit 100,000 views," Lucie said.

Thousands of people have since commented on the video, with many of them admiring the dog’s spirit.

"I'm laughing my guts out it's so funny," wrote Facebook user Annie Hicks.

Lucie does see the funny side of events however.

"They say every dog has their day, so I guess Lily is enjoying her 15 mins of fame." 

Lily made a run for it when owner Lucie Green stopped at a shop in the Northland town. Source: Seven Sharp

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Pasifika leaders call for action after Florida bar trademarks Fijian bula greeting

Pasifika leaders in New Zealand are calling for people to post one-star reviews for a Florida bar that has trademarked the word 'bula'.

The commonly-used Fijian greeting was trademarked this month by United States businessman, Ross Kashtan.

This sparked outrage online.

Ross Kashtan owned three "bula" businesses spread across Florida - Bula Kafe, Bula on the Beach and Bula Coco Beach.

He probably did not expect a huge backlash when he went to trademark the word "bula".

But he got one.

Among those to express their fury online was Josiah Tualamali'i, who is one of the members of the Mental Health and Addictions Inquiry panel and the chairperson of New Zealand Pasifika youth charity PYLAT.

Mr Tualamali'i wanted people to leave one-star reviews on the Facebook page of one of Mr Kashtan's bars.

"I just thought 'well they have 4.9 as their overall rating so let's pull that back a bit'," said Mr Tualamali'i.

"We know they are listening because they removed my comment and some others, so this has got to them and that was the point."

Dozens of angry people have left such reviews.

The word Bula itself is a commonly-used traditional Fijian greeting.

Trademarking it meant Mr Kashtan could attempt to prevent other businesses like his using the word.

"They are trying to steal something that doesn't belong to them," said Mr Tualamali'i. "It really has to end."

Mr Kashtan's bula logo appeared on many of his business' products and advertising, from signage and bottle branding, to "bula babe shorts".

Checkpoint repeatedly tried to get in touch with Mr Kashtan, but only got as far as one of his workers who was well aware of the unfolding drama.

"It's not to inhibit anyone to use it, we just don't want anyone calling their businesses that because we have a ten-year-old business called 'bula'," the worker said.

"It's not too hurt anybody...we are really good people I promise."

He said he would pass along Checkpoint's contact details to Mr Kashtan, but we have not heard back.

It's not the first time United States businesses have been accused of cultural appropriation.

Illinois restaurant chain Aloha Poke Company copped criticism just last month for sending cease and desist letters to other restaurants using the word 'aloha'.

The US Patent and Trademark office lists 43 companies which have trademarked the word 'bula".

The New Zealand government was unimpressed with this recent trademark.

The Minister for Pacific Peoples, Aupito William Sio, said more needed to be done to stop this kind of thing happening.

"This is a disturbing revelation and will be distressful not only to Fijians in New Zealand but to all Fijians throughout the world," he said.

"It is unbelievable that a company from another country can trademark what belongs to another group of people."

- by Logan Church

rnz.co.nz

Bula Kafe. Source: Facebook

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Tracking down New Plymouth youth MP candidates after Andrew Little's 'hip' appeal

Labour MP Andrew Little released a tongue in cheek video encouraging young people from New Plymouth to get involved in politics today.

The video inspired TVNZ1's Seven Sharp to travel to Mr Little's old school to find the perfect candidate for its new youth MP.

Judge for yourself if New Plymouth Boys' High students Thomas Foy and Jarrod Wilson have what it takes in the video above.

Tamati Rimene-Sproat is on the case after the Labour MP's piece of political theatre. Source: Seven Sharp


Watch: Take a tour inside Kate Sheppard’s former house where suffragists worked to get women the right to vote

Suffragist Kate Sheppard's old house in Christchurch goes up for auction next month - so Seven Sharp host Hilary Barry took a tour.

Ms Sheppard was instrumental in gaining New Zealand women the right to vote in 1893. She carried out important work for the suffrage movement in the house during the late 19th Century.

Today saw celebrations around the country marking 125 years since women gained the right to vote in New Zealand.

Jacinda Ardern has indicated the Government is interested in buying the house for the nation. It's expected to fetch in excess of $3 million when it goes under the hammer on October 17.

Hilary Barry met with the home's current owner Julia Burbury who showed her around the dwelling set on one acre of gardens.

The house has a category one heritage listing.

The piece of New Zealand history in Christchurch, worth more than $3 million, is up for auction. Source: Seven Sharp