More foreign winemakers travelling to Marlborough to learn their trade

A growing number of young winemakers from around the world are travelling to Marlborough to learn their trade.

The first fruits of the region's wine season are being harvested and young wine enthusiasts have travelled to New Zealand for a taste of the action.

It's estimated around 1000 workers go to Marlborough each year for vintage. A high proportion of those are from foreign countries.

"In all restaurants in the world now, you have a Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc on the wine list, so young people that are learning about wine and are learning about making great wines from around the world know of Marlborough and they know of Marlborough Sauvignon Blanc," says Framingham wines managing director Tom Trolove.

Chloe Mills told 1 NEWS back home in the United States, she mostly worked with Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

"So Sauvingnon Blanc and Riesling is going to be a new experience for me."

Ms Mills is one of several international interns working at Framingham winery for around six weeks.

"The people that are coming are winemaking professionals, typically they've done their degree, they've maybe done a couple of vintages and now they're doing what they call 'vintage abroad'. So they'll do two or three of these stints around the world," Mr Trolove says.

The Marlborough wineries act as modern-day classrooms.

"In the old world it's always like, 'Okay, well this region produces this grape and that's what it's known for'. But in the new world you just have that much more experimental side," explains British visitor Gracie Matterson.

The industry is welcoming the extra hands for harvest, putting on a concert to mark their arrival and raising a glass to the next generation.

The region will draw in around 1000 for this year's harvest. Source: 1 NEWS



Most read: Auckland bar responds to Pink's outburst: 'It was a bit of a shock'

This story was first pubksihed on Wednesday September 12.

The pop star wasn’t happy her group wasn’t allowed into Deadshot, and let her millions of followers know. Source: Seven Sharp

After seven world class concerts Pink decided to celebrate and head to Auckland's food and beverage hotspot of Ponsonby on Tuesday.

Pink’s first choice of bar was Deadshot, but unfortunately, her large group was turned away.

Soon afterwards, the whole world heard about it when the pop star Tweeted about the encounter to her millions of followers.

After the unwanted publicity, manager Heather Garland spoke to Seven Sharp.

“One of the crew came in earlier in the day and spoke to Brian over the bar and he told them we just couldn’t take a group that big, and offered to find them somewhere else," she said.

“But they showed up anyway and we couldn’t fit them in.”

Garland said they simply couldn’t cater for 30 people.

“They just went on their way and we didn’t realise there was a problem.”

Pink then took to Twitter saying, “She’s been to some cool bars around the world and Deadshot is not one of them.”

Garland said it came as a bit of a shock, but was pleased by the support they had been shown.

“We never even saw her, we didn’t even know she was part of the group.”

But when Deadshot couldn’t cater for them, they went across the road to the Revelry bar.

Alex Dunn was about to shut up shop when the superstar and her crew dropped in.

“She came to the bar herself, so we were just sitting down together discussing what cocktail she was going for.”

It turns out Pink likes pink drinks so she had a blush negroni.

Dunn says, ‘It wasn’t intentional but I had a feeling that she might like the colour and that I might get a few extra bonus points.”

Her posts here were a little kinder calling the Revelry bar, “The perfect place in Auckland.”

Pink got down to some Kiwi tunes and the party ended around 2am.


Russian troops sweep across Siberia in war games with China amid tensions with US

Hundreds of thousands Russian troops have swept across Siberia in the nation's largest ever war games also joined by China - a powerful show of burgeoning military ties between Moscow and Beijing amid their tensions with the US.

Moscow said the weeklong Vostok (East) 2018 manoeuvres will span vast expanses of Siberia and the Far East, the Arctic and the Pacific Oceans and involve nearly 300,000 Russian troops - nearly one-third of the country's one-million-strong military. They will feature more than 1,000 aircraft, about 36,000 tanks and other military vehicles and 80 warships.

Russian Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu has described the drills as even bigger than the country's largest Cold War-era exercise called Zapad 1981 that put NATO allies on edge.

A retired Russian general said that the giant war games come as a warning to the US against ramping up pressure on Russia.

"The manoeuvres are aimed at deterring the aggressive intentions of the US and NATO," Retired General Leonid Ivashov said. He was quoted by the Interfax news agency as saying that the drills are "also a response to the US sanctions."

China is sending about 3,200 troops, 900 combat vehicles and 30 aircraft to join the drills at a Siberian firing range, a significant deployment that reflects its shift toward a full-fledged military alliance with Russia. Mongolia also has sent a military contingent.

Asked if the US is worried about a possible military alliance between Russia and China, Defence Secretary Jim Mattis told Pentagon reporters on Tuesday that, "I think that nations act out of their interests. I see little in the long term that aligns Russia and China."

As the manoeuvres kicked off, Chinese President Xi Jinping visited Russia on Tuesday to attend an economic forum in Vladivostok. 

President Vladimir Putin treated Xi to pancakes with caviar and shots of vodka in a show of their warm rapport.

Moscow and Beijing have forged what they described as a "strategic partnership," expressing their shared opposition to the "unipolar" world, the term they use to describe perceived US global domination. However, the military drills they had until now were far smaller in scale, reflecting China's caution about alliances.

Some experts pointed out that the US helped spawn closer Russia-China military ties by labelling them strategic competitors.

"They feel they need to embrace to deal with the increasingly high pressure and containment from the US," said Yue Gang, a military expert and retired Chinese army colonel.

He noted that China feels that the Washington's hostile attitude and actions, such as deploying the THAAD missile defense system in South Korea, relieve it of any need to take US views into consideration when deepening strategic trust with Moscow.

"The war games have laid a foundation for China and Russia to enhance cooperation on international arena and will lift the combat proficiency of both sides," he said.

The Chinese media touted the Chinese involvement in the manoeuvres as the country's largest-ever dispatch of forces abroad for war games.

Some noted that the People's Liberation Army, which hasn't fought a war since the attempted invasion of Vietnam in 1979, is keen to learn from Russia's experience in the Syrian campaign, where it tested its latest weapons and tactics.

Around 300,000 troops will take part in the Vostok war games, as well as 1000 aircraft and 900 tanks. Source: 1 NEWS


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Watch: Jeremy Wells goes on the hunt for the Kiwi classic Frying Saucer 'superfood'

After a recent investigation into the origin of the chop suey pattie, Seven Sharp is now looking into what happened to the Frying Saucer.

Jeremy Wells remembers the culinary delight fondly, calling it the superfood of the 70s and 80s.

"It was a perfectly balanced meal in one pattie, meat, vegetables and potato enjoyed by our family in front of the television on a Sunday night watching It's A Dog Show.

"But then in 1990 all of sudden the Frying Saucer disappeared from supermarket shelves," the Seven Sharp co-host said.

Wells met a man who is on a mission to bring the Frying Saucer back to Kiwi supermarkets.

Check out his adventure in the video above. 

In 1980s New Zealand, Frying Saucers represented the future of food convenience. Source: Seven Sharp


Are there cracks in the coalition? Disagreement with NZ First forced Labour to abandon announcing details of Crown-Māori Relations portfolio

Cracks are appearing in the coalition Government with the the big influence of Winston Peters putting heat on the Prime Minister and hampering policy announcements and the passing of legislation.

1 NEWS understands disagreements within the coalition forced Labour to abandon announcing detail of its Crown-Māori Relations portfolio earlier this week.

Monday's cabinet meeting was a chance for the Government to lay out the detail of its new Crown-Māori portfolio, but in an unusual twist the information didn't follow.

"I'm not going to pre-announce cabinet papers," Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said after the meeting.

1 NEWS now understands it was due to New Zealand First and Labour disagreeing over the detail in cabinet, postponing the announcement

In Parliament today, National's Gerry Brownlee said New Zealand First Leader Winston Peters "still hasn't stopped acting as prime minister. He is the veto on everything this Government does".

Mr Peters was unwilling to answer questions about the matter today.

Asked by 1 NEWS if New Zealand First veted the establishment of an agency for the Crown-Maori portfolio in the Ministry of Justice, he replied: "Well look I can't answer that question 'cause I don't have any recall of that."

"Send me a written question, I'll give you an answer because I'm not going to do it off the top of my head. I don't have a very present recall of that."

Asked why he can't recall given that cabinet was only held on Monday, Mr Peters said: "Well because I want to know the exact detail on that before I answer the question."

But NZ First minister Shane Jones didn't hide his contempt just yesterday, telling reporters: "[We] need to be realistic about what we can achieve in the next 24 months."

During Question Time today, National leader Simon Bridges asked the Prime Minister: "Can we no longer believe ministerial press statements unless they're signed off by Mr Peters?"

Ms Ardern replied: "No, ridiculous."

It is the latest issue in a string of disagreements.

Labour was set to repeal the three strikes law but was forced by NZ First to back down.

Then there's the refugee quota. Labour is keen to double it, but NZ First is in no hurry. 

And recently there's been disagreement on employment law, including whether to scrap the youth pay rate.

Asked recently on TVNZ1's Q+A if Labour can't get rid of the youth pay rate because NZ First won't agree, Employment Minister Willie Jackson said: "We agree to disagree sometimes."

Mr Bridges said today he thinks "people are talking about the tail wagging the dog for the first time right now in this Government".

Ms Ardern said: "We debate a number of issues, this is one of many, and we have good robust processes for each."

The Prime Minister was sticking to her mantra today, saying in the House: "All other policies go through a cabinet process."

It's a Cabinet process that's not always straight forward with a coalition government.

The influence of Winston Peters is also believed to be putting the Prime Minister under pressure from rival MPs. Source: 1 NEWS