Meet the ordinary Kiwis who've quit their jobs to make money full time through property investment

A group of enterprising Kiwis think they've hit on the right formula when it comes to investing in the property market.

My Properties is a group of about 30 property investors, who specialise in renovations, helping each other out to make the most of their investments.

"It's a community that's based on sharing rather than competition, we love helping each other out," My Properties founder Armin Morrison said.

Each member pays around $6000 a year for advice, contacts and weekly house hunting trips and tips.

The group is made up of Kiwis from all walks of life including vets, hairdressers, teachers and even an ex-bin company delivery owner.

Property investment allows them to be their own boss, take holidays when they want and feel like they're helping out the community at the same time.

"We're happy to put in hard work take properties that people can't do the renovation on because it's too big," Ms Morrison said.

The group called My Properties reckon they've got the right formula. Source: Seven Sharp



New law in California limits plastic straws in restaurants

People who want straws with their drinks at California restaurants will have to ask for them under a new state law.

The law signed today by Governor Jerry Brown makes California the first US state to bar full-service restaurants from automatically giving out single-use plastic straws. It takes effect next year.300

The law doesn't ban plastic straws outright like some cities have.

Restaurants that don't comply will get two warnings before being fined up to NZ $450 per year. It will apply only to full-service restaurants, not fast food establishments.

Democratic lawmakers who support the law call it a small step toward reducing ocean pollution.

Plastic is bad, including straws, but the trouble is other options don’t always do the trick. Source: Seven Sharp

The law comes as cities and businesses around the world experiment with ditching the plastic products.

In April, 26 bars, restaurants, cafes and food trucks along Wellington's waterfront pledged to go plastic straw free.

"Our primary position is no straw if we can get away with it, but if somebody request one we will put one in the glass," Munchen Bar owner John Henderson told 1 NEWS at the time.

Businesses in Rangiora in North Canterbury have made similar moves, and politicians in the United Kingdom have announced straws will be banned there as early as next year.

Critics argue California's new law is government overreach that won't significantly improve the environment. Some say restricting straws hurts disabled people who rely on them.

Allison Franklin from Christchurch is passionate about the environment, but she also wants to use a plastic straw. Source: 1 NEWS

But straws are an eyesore that litter beaches around the world, and banning them is a step in the right direction, advocates in New Zealand agree.

"If you walk along beaches, especially Oriental Bay and Evans Bay (in Wellington), you'll see plastic straws strewn around the beaches," Oliver Vetter of Sustainable Oceans told 1 NEWS after the voluntary business ban in Wellington.

"We pick up about ten thousand straws a year just as part of our Love Your Coast program in Wellington."

Twenty-six bars, cafes, restaurants and food trucks on the waterfront are trialling a plastic straw-free future. Source: 1 NEWS

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1080 case goes to Māori Land Court as two Northland men challenge DOC's right to drop on Russell State Forest

Two Northland men challenging DOC's right to drop 1080 on Russell State Forest say it needs to show it has consent from Māori and the community.

Riki Ngakoti and Hayward Brown have applied to the Māori Land Court for an injunction to stop the pesticide drop that's set to happen in the next fortnight.

Auckland opponents of 1080 trying to stop a drop in the Hunua Ranges, have taken their case to the Environment Court.

But Mr Ngakoti said he had sought advice from the Tikanga Māori Law Society and believed the Māori Land Court had jurisdiction.

"There will be arguments by the settlers of New Zealand - our fellow Kiwis - and government officials, that the Department of Conservation manages Crown land. We had that argument from the court when we applied, but we...interpret that land to be Māori customary land."

Mr Ngakoti said he and Mr Brown were not so much anti-1080 as anti-risk and DOC had not provided a forum in which that risk could be publicly evaluated and debated.

"We have tried to do a bit of research but some of the risks we haven't been able to satisfy ourselves about are the effect of 1080 on the environment below the ground... the micro-organisms, the works, the bugs - there hasn't been thorough research."

The Māori Land Court will hold the injunction hearing on Monday in Whangarei.

Meanwhile the lawyer acting for the Auckland 1080 opponents, Sue Grey, said further court challenges to the use of 1080 were inevitable.

"There has been no forum for public conversation and it got much worse last year when the former Minister for the Environment Nick Smith passed...regulations exempting 1080 from all the usual resource consent processes.

"You need resource consent if you want to extend your fence - but DOC doesn't have to get a consent or have any public consultation for dropping poison into public areas."

That had led to a build-up of pressure because people had genuine concerns and nowhere to air them, she said.

DOC has linked the anti-1080 spam campaign on Facebook to threats against its staff, based on misinformation about the toxin

But Ms Grey said she stood by her advice to 1080 opponents to use social media to promote their cause.

"I would never advocate any threats or violence. My view is that the court processes are there and we need to use them and that's what I encourage my clients to do."

Ms Grey said there had been a lot of allegations made about threats but she had her doubts.

"I've just seen an OIA response from the police and it seems that very few of those alleged incidents did happen," she said.

"There seems to be a pattern of exaggeration of these threats."

However DOC and Forest and Bird sources told RNZ there had been very serious threats made and staff were worried.

By Lois Williams

rnz.co.nz

Source: rnz.co.nz

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Private housing tenants evicted over meth contamination should also be compensated, says advocate

Tenants in private housing incorrectly evicted as a result of methamphetamine contamination testing should also be in line for compensation, according to Action Against Poverty.

Ricardo Menendez, from Action Against Poverty, said as many as 2400 evicted tenants should be in line for compensation despite Housing Minister Phil Twyford announcing yesterday that around 800 Housing NZ tenants would be reimbursed for costs related to their evictions.

“These (the 800) would have the Housing NZ tenants that would have fallen into the catchment but I do feel that all tenants should be up for compensation as well even though some (were in) private housing,” Mr Menendez told TVNZ1’s Breakfast.

“A lot of these tenants were evicted through the testing as a way to pave for redevelopments or developments for housing so I think it was just an excuse to push people out of their communities."

Housing NZ tenant Kathleen Paraha said she the meth contamination evictions had taken an enormous toll, with WINZ blaming innocent people for being evicted.

"These people have lost their furniture, their clothing, and when they go to WINZ, they’ve been declined of clothing and stuff because they think it’s been contaminated so they’re not offering enough,” she said.

“They’ve been put in debt because they’ve been evicted, because WINZ have been saying that they did this themselves, it’s their fault.”

“For one thing they should clear the debt that the government has put them in the first place.”

“They’ve been told to pay for their motel bills if they put them into motels, they’ve been told to pay for it because it’s their fault.”

Kathleen Paraha said the Housing NZ evictions took an enormous personal toll on those evicted, putting people in debt and often leading to drug use among those left homeless. Source: Breakfast


Police seeking information over terrifying early morning robbery at Tauranga home involving an axe

Police are seeking public information after a terrifying assault and robbery at a Tauranga home where two offenders broke into the house early this morning armed with an axe and crowbar.

Officers responded to an aggravated burglary on Waterford Park Drive in Papamoa at approximately 4.30am, Detective Sergeant Darryl Brazier said.

Two men had entered the property and assaulted two occupants of the house, a man and woman, before stealing two cars from the property.

The two victims received minor injuries but did not require ambulance treatment though they are receiving continued support from police, Detective Sergeant Brazier said.

Police have recovered the vehicles nearby and are currently examining them while a scene examination is also underway at the property.

If anyone in the area has any information which could assist with the Police investigation we encourage them to ring Tauranga Police on 577 4300.

Information can also be given anonymously via Crimestoppers on 0800 555 111.

Man with axe
Source: istock.com