Homicide investigation launched after man fatally stabbed in Northland's Moerewa

A homicide investigation has been launched following the fatal stabbing in the Northland town of Moerewa last night.

Emergency services were called to an address at 8.45pm.

Police say a 57-year-old man died at the scene.

A woman is currently assisting Police with inquiries.

Police say the pair are known to each other and no one else is being sought over the incident.

A post mortem examination will be carried out tomorrow.

Police car generic.
Police car generic. Source: 1 NEWS

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Kiwi artist's carving made from bone of stranded whale in Scotland on display in Dunedin

When a stranded whale dies on the shores in New Zealand, it is likely artist Chris Charteris will get a call.

The artist uses whale bone as part of his traditional Māori carving.

One of his latest carvings uses bone that travelled around the world to reach New Zealand.

It's the focus of an application to the Department of Conservation to hold, import and export the carved sperm whale jaw bone to Australia for its new owner.

The bone was originally harvested from a dead sperm whale that was stranded on a beach in Scotland in 1977.

Accomplished Māori carver Major H Woods acquired it later that year from the British Museum before he exported it to New Zealand in 1994.

Mr Woods sent a crate with the bone in it to New Zealand, intending to return to his country.

However, he passed away before he could travel back to carve with it.

Mr Charteris was asked whether he was interested in buying the bone from Mr Woods' estate in 1998 as he was supplying Auckland Museum with carvings.

Two decades later, the finished carved bone sculpture was exhibited at Milford Galleries Dunedin.

Only 37.2 centimetres in height, it's a small, but valuable piece.

The jaw bone was particularly prized as the most solid part of the skeleton, he said.

"I'd consider all of the skeleton remains of the whale are equally precious to me."

Mr Charteris has been working with whale bone since the 1980s.

It's a controversial material to be working with, even though the bone is collected from dead beached whales.

He described a guilt people still appeared to feel about the slaughtering of whales to "light the lamps of London".

"I think we still have a residue of guilt.

"I feel that if I have the opportunity to work with that material then it's my job to honour and to do the best that I can with it.

"It is a part of my heritage to be involved in using whale bone, there's quite a strong connection to the material and to the whales."

Technology made bone carving a lot simpler and quicker, he said.

"It has made what would have been a number of years ago a very labour intensive process, a lot more efficient."

Submissions close for the permit to export the carved jaw bone on 20 September.

 Image courtesy of Milford Galleries Dunedin. Glenn Frei.
Image courtesy of Milford Galleries Dunedin. Glenn Frei. Source: Image courtesy of Milford Galleries Dunedin. Glenn Frei.


Work starts for Hundertwasser Art Centre in Whangārei

Work's begun in earnest this week on Whangārei's Hundertwasser Art Centre.

Contractors have finished demolishing the old Harbour Board building on the site and started driving the piles.

A spokesman for the $28 million project, Greg Hayes, said the foundations would be supporting the largest earth-roof in the southern hemisphere.

Mr Hayes said 75 steel tubes will be driven 33 metres into the ground, then augured out and filled with steel and concrete to lock into the bedrock.

The job should take about a month, he said.

Mr Hayes said neighbours of the Hundertwasser project were braced for some serious thumping as the piles went in but there had been a lot less vibration than expected.

By Lois Williams

rnz.co.nz

Contractors have to drive 75 steel tubes 33 metres into the ground.
Contractors have to drive 75 steel tubes 33 metres into the ground. Source: rnz.co.nz