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Judith Collins says accusations she politicised her faith 'utterly offensive'

National leader Judith Collins says accusations she is politicising her faith is "utterly offensive". 

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The National leader visited St Thomas Tāmaki yesterday and prayed in the chapel. Source: 1 NEWS

The National leader visited St Thomas in Tāmaki yesterday and prayed in the chapel before casting her vote. 

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The National leader says choosing to vote for her party was easy. Source: 1 NEWS

"I was simply asked by the Minister if I would like to make a prayer," Collins said today. "As an Anglican I see no problem with it. After all it was Sunday."

New Conservative leader Leighton Baker told 1 NEWS he thought Collins was "concerned New Conservatives are taking a bit of the vote, she wants to try and grab that". The party received 1.4 per cent support in the latest 1 NEWS Colmar Brunton Poll

Collins said today claims she was politicising her faith "deeply offensive". 

"I'm not ashamed of being a Christian. I'm happy to be one."

She said she goes to church several times a year. 

"If you think about any other religion and people take a moment to pray, people don't actually say anything do they?"

"I'm a confirmed Anglican... of course, I’m going to take that moment to pray. Faith is a personal thing. I didn't ask the media to come with me."

Labour leader Jacinda Ardern said she considered herself agnostic after being asked about her religion today. 

"I was raised in a religious (mormon) household. I’ve always been proud of my upbringing but I now consider myself agnostic."

In Collins' 2002 maiden speech, she said she believed "in God, and I believe that every human being is created with free will to do either good or evil".