Jacinda Ardern's newborn 'hungry and alert' with mum 'a bit tired' after staying up all night feeding her

That concludes 1 NEWS NOW's live updates as New Zealand waits for Jacinda Ardern, Clarke Gayford and their baby girl to make their first public appearance.

11.05am: The PMs office has confirmed she recently received a private congratulatory message from the Queen via email on the birth of her baby.

The Prime Minister's Office says it was a private message so it won't be made public.

10.40am: A little bit of info from Auckland City Hospital: the average stay for a first time mother there is 2.3 days.

A billboard in Christchurch congratulating Jacinda Ardern on the birth of her girl.
A billboard in Christchurch congratulating Jacinda Ardern on the birth of her girl. Source: 1 NEWS

10.21am: A large electronic advertising billboard on Moorhouse Ave and Lincoln Rd in Christchurch Central has a message of congratulations for Jacinda and the Baby.

9.55am: The Maori Party has this morning released a statement expressing their "great joy" at the birth of Jacinda Ardern and Clarke Gayford's first child.

"We congratulate Jacinda and Clarke for embracing so publicly a concept that is very much part of a Māori worldview – that children are seen as belonging to, and being the responsibility of the wider whānau and community." Maori Party co-vice-president, Kaapua Smith said.

Google has added this hook to its New Zealand homepage in celebration of the baby. Source: 1 NEWS

9.41am: Google has celebrated Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's first child with a Google home-page graphic - an interpretation of the original 'fish hook' image from her pregnancy announcement. The illustration is by Stephen Templer, a Wellington based artist.

9.23am: The PM was reportedly up most of last night feeding her baby - who is described as "hungry and alert" by nurses.

Ardern's baby was one of 24 born yesterday at Auckland City Hospital.  

9.14am: Reports from the Auckland City Hospital say Jacinda Ardern  has just woken after a "pretty brief sleep", says 1 NEWS political editor Jessica Mutch.

"Everyone is really well, if not a bit tired," Mutch said.

"Nurses have described the baby as ‘very alert and one hungry baby'.

"After her efforts the PM had a dinner of marmite toast and milo last night."

9.05am: Jacinda Ardern will not appear today publicly outside Auckland City Hospital to front the media.

An update from the Labour Party this morning said she is set to spend another night in hospital.

After Jacinda Ardern gave birth to a healthy baby girl at 4.45pm last night, New Zealanders are today eagerly waiting to hear the Prime Minister speak publicly.

The Labour Party is set to give an update at 9am on whether the Prime Minister will emerge from Auckland City Hospital today to front the media.

Ardern announced a few weeks out from her due date that she would hold a media conference outside hospital following the birth of her first child, before retiring for six weeks maternity leave. 

The newborn weighing 3.31kg arrived at 4.45pm today. Source: 1 NEWS

A key point of speculation is what name name Ardern and Gayford will give their baby girl.

Last night, news of the first baby of New Zealand was revealed on Jacinda Ardern's Instagram.

"Welcome to our village wee one," Ms Ardern wrote.

"Feeling very lucky to have a healthy baby girl that arrived at 4.45pm weighing 3.31kg (7.3lb) Thank you so much for your best wishes and your kindness. We're all doing really well thanks to the wonderful team at Auckland City Hospital."

Ardern now becomes the first elected world leader to take maternity leave - and only the second to have a child while in office - having handed over her duties to her deputy earlier in the day.

The PM's first child is due June 17, and yesterday she released some details around photo ops and hospitals to address public interest. Source: Breakfast

The announcement of the birth spurred celebrations and an immediate outpouring of congratulations on social media and across the political spectrum.

Former prime minister and senior UN official Helen Clark described it as "inspirational", while the leader of the opposition, Simon Bridges, said he was delighted for the new parents.

Meanwhile major media organisations in the United States, Britain, Australia, Europe and Asia launched breaking news banners with the announcement.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull told the ABC he was "really thrilled", while Britain's Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn also sent his congratulations.

British Prime Minister Theresa May retweeted Clarke Gayford's announcement of the birth and added, "Congratulations to @JacindaArdern and @NZClarke on the birth of your little girl."

For her part, Ms Ardern has played down the global attention she's received as a role model in recent months.

"I am able to do what I'm doing because I have enormous support around me and it makes me quite privileged," she said recently.

Determined to keep working until the final moment, Ms Ardern travelled until last week and her office yesterday confirmed she was still texting staff after going into labour to make sure they were fine.  



MP Meka Whaitiri dumped as Customs Minister after investigation into alleged misconduct

Customs Minister Meka Whaitiri has been dumped as Customs Minister after an investigation by ministerial services into an incident with a staffer during an event in Gisborne in late August.

Ms Whaitiri, the MP for Ikaroa-Rāwhiti, was alleged to have assaulted a staff member at the event, 1 NEWS reported last month.

Asked about the incident on her return to Parliament a few days later, Ms Whaitiri told media: "I'm cooperating fully with the investigation. I've got no further comment," she told media. "I am here as the MP for Ikaroa-Rāwhiti."

It comes after the MP was accused of assaulting a staff member in Gisborne. Source: 1 NEWS

But today, after ministerial services returned their findings to Jacinda Ardern, the prime minister dropped the axe.

"Based on the context and conclusions of the report I no longer have confidence in Meka Whaitiri as minister at this time," Ms Ardern said this afternoon.

She said the decision was based solely on the Gisborne incident, which Ms Whaitiri was disputing. 

"I'm not getting into any details around the incident. I've asked DIA (Department of Internal Affairs) to prepare a version of the report that can be released in order to address some outstanding questions."

When pushed on whether this was a pattern of behaviour often exhibited by Ms Whaitiri, Ms Ardern refused to say whether she'd learned of other incidents involving Ms Whaitiri.

"The minister has not had any other grievances raised against her. I've made a decision based on this incident and this report.

"Kris Faafoi will retain the role of Minister of Customs and Meka Whaitiri's associate minister responsibilities will sit with the lead portfolio ministers.

"There are no plans to undertake a cabinet reshuffle," Ms Ardern said.

Ms Ardern said Ms Whaitiri continued to defend herself but had accepted her decision and was keen to stay on as the MP for Ikaroa-Rāwhiti.

"I spoke to Meka Whaitiri this morning.

"I have been advised by colleagues in her caucus that they wish to still support her in that role [speaking of Māori Caucus co-chairwoman role].

"I have confidence in her continuing as a member of Parliament and in those roles as member of Parliament."

She said Ms Whaitiri was likely to return to Parliament next week.

"I have a view that the member works incredibly hard across Ikaroa-Rāwhiti, that she will continue to be able to fulfil those roles, however based on what I have seen, I do not have confidence in her retaining her role as minister," Ms Ardern reiterated.


The Prime Minister says she took action after an investigation deemed an incident did happen. Source: 1 NEWS


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Six 'cowboy' car traders banned for five years amid increased online trading

Six rogue car dealers have been banned from trading for five years for serious breaches, including failing to comply with orders from the Motor Vehicle Disputes Tribunal.

Car keys

In the past year, the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment prosecuted and fined 18 traders for unregistered trading, including seven in the last month alone.

The Registrar of Motor Vehicle Traders and manager of Trading Standards, Stephen O'Brien, said the number of "cowboy" traders was increasing, largely due to the growing online motor vehicle market.

"The purchase of a motor vehicle is likely to be one of the largest purchases a consumer will make and it is vital that consumers have confidence in the industry," Mr O'Brien said.

"Unregistered motor vehicle traders are not subject to the checks that apply to those who are registered and consumers may have less protection when something goes wrong."

Under the Motor Vehicle Sales Act 2003, registered motor vehicle traders are required to display a Consumer Information Notice, keep a record of the contract for sale, and prohibit tampering with the odometers of a motor vehicle.

Mr O'Brien said the ministry's main objective was to get "voluntary compliance" from traders.

"In the cases where the trader does not engage with the registrar, or refuses to comply, we will investigate and take the necessary action."

Consumers can check if a trader is registered online through Trading Standards Motor Trader website.

rnz.co.nz

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East Coast forestry company's illegal logging history revealed

The Malaysian owner of a forestry company blamed for tonnes of debris washing up in Tolaga Bay has been fined twice for illegal logging overseas, but it took the Overseas Investment Office nine years to realise.

The penalty could have affected Samling Group's Hikurangi Forest Farm's good character status, but the OIO decided it was too late to take any action.

Separately, a Malaysian billionaire who owns another Tolaga Bay forestry company was granted 24 consents to buy sensitive land between 2005 and 2017, even though another of his companies has faced accusations of environmental and human rights abuses overseas since 2004.

The admission of OIO's tardy response to the Samling's illegal logging fine has prompted calls for the OIO to beef up its monitoring of foreign investors and for changes to the way the good character test is applied.

Hikurangi Forest Farms, owned by Malaysia's Samling Group, was granted consent to buy 22ha of land in Gisborne in May 2007.

Five months later one of Samling's subsidiaries, Barama Company, was fined for illegal logging in Guyana. In January 2008 it was fined again.

The Norwegian Pension Fund quit all its Samling investments in 2010 because of ethical concerns about its operations in Guyana and Malaysia and Samling's palm oil operations in Myanmar were last year accused of illegal deforestation indigenous land grabs and environmental abuses by civil rights groups in that country.

The OIO said it was aware of online reports of the company's practices in Myanmar but it had not been able to verify them.

It only became aware of the illegal logging fines in 2017.

"After considering various matters, including limitation issues and the age of the fine, and how long ago Samling got OIO consent, we considered the fine was too long ago for us to act on this information alone," Land Information New Zealand's Overseas Investment Office manager Vanessa Horne said.

That action could have included forcing the sale of assets owned by Samling.

Meanwhile, a second Malaysian-owned company also implicated in the Tolaga Bay flooding, has continued to buy sensitive land in New Zealand despite its owners facing allegations of human rights and environmental abuses abroad.

Ernslaw One, owned by Malaysia's Tiong family, is one of the three companies whose activities are being investigated by the Gisborne District Council after the June floods.

Its founder Tan Sri Tiong Hiew King made his fortune in forestry and palm oil plantations and his assets here included New Zealand King Salmon, Winstone Pulp and Neil Group.

One of his logging companies Rimbunan Hijau faces accusations of illegal operations and human rights and environmental abuses in Papua New Guinea and Malaysia, first documented by Greenpeace in 2004, and more recently this month by the Oakland Institute.

But it hasn't affected his business in New Zealand with 24 consents to buy sensitive land being granted since 2005.

The Tiong family has been investing in New Zealand for more than 20 years, with more than 90 approved consents to the companies controlled by the family, OIO's Vanessa Horne said.

"For the OIO to take enforcement action after consent has been granted for any breach of a good character condition, it would need to prove that a person is not fit to hold an asset.

"We need to consider the nature of the allegation, the evidence of the allegation and the public interest in taking action, such as the impact on New Zealanders from taking action. The commission of an offence by a person may provide evidence as to whether they are fit to hold an asset. But this is not the only matter the OIO would need to consider," she said.

Both Samling and the Tiong family's Rimbunan Hijau were yesterday named as irresponsible palm oil producers in a report published by Greenpeace.

Campaign Against Foreign Control of Aotearoa (CAFCA) said the OIO's good character test was not rigorous enough.

"To prove companies are of good character representative of the company usually a New Zealand lawyer has to sign a bit of paper certifying they're of good character - that's it," CAFCA spokesperson Murray Horton said.

Council of Trade Unions policy director Bill Rosenberg said the test also only applied to individuals, not the company itself. But he would like to see that changed.

"If you have companies with a consistent poor record of ignoring good environmental practice, no action can be taken under the current law."

East Coast environmental and indigenous rights advocate Tina Ngata said she was "appalled" to learn of the actions that Hikurangi Forest Farms and Ernslaw One's parent companies were accused of in other countries.

It was up to the OIO to monitor foreign investors more stringently and take action if necessary, she said.

"The OIO need to be taking a better role in monitoring the behaviour of these companies if they allow them into our economy so they don't make these kinds of impacts on our landscape."

It was especially important where public money was used to clean up environments impacted by companies failing to follow good practices, she said.

The OIO had nine permanent staff, up from just two in 2015, so it had more capacity to monitor and enforce consent conditions, including good character requirements, Vanessa Horne said.

Oregon Group declined to comment, and several attempts to contact its Malaysian owner were unsuccessful. Hikurangi Forest Farms and its owner Samling could also not be reached for comment.

By Anusha Bradley

rnz.co.nz

Slash debris after flooding in Tolaga Bay. (Emma Hatton) Source: rnz.co.nz


Hamilton shooting which left man in hospital was 'targeted attack'

Police say the shooting of a man in Hamilton last night was a "targeted attack".

The incident occurred on Derby Street at approximately 10:25pm yesterday, leaving a 35-year-old man in Waikato Hospital with moderate but not life-threatening injuries.

The man is in a stable condition in a high dependency unit.

Hamilton City Area Commander Inspector Freda Grace said a group was involved in the attack.

"Investigations so far have established a group of offenders arrived at Derby Street and approached a house they believed belonged to the target of their attack and knocked on the door," she said.

"A man who lived at the address opened the door and an altercation occurred. He was uninjured but understandably shaken by the event.

"Following this, the group of offenders went to the house next door. A number of shots were fired and the 35-year-old man they were targeting was hit inside his address.

"The group have then fled the scene in vehicles."

Police are continuing a scene investigation today but it is not yet known whether the incident involves members of organised crime groups.

Inspector Grace says there is nothing to suggest the shooting is connected to a number of serious incidents involving people being harmed across Waikato in recent months.

Police are keen to talk to anyone who was in the area around 10:25pm yesterday who may have witnessed anything suspicious or have information of interest to the investigation.

People can contact Hamilton Police on 07 858 6200 or call Crimestoppers anonymously via 0800 555 111.

The incident took place in Nawton at 10.25pm yesterday – the offender fled the scene by car. Source: Breakfast