TODAY |

Government investing almost $5 million into cutting edge cancer treatment research

The Government is investing almost $5 million into cutting-edge cancer treatment research, Research, Science and Innovation Minister Megan Woods announced today.

The investment is part of a $14.4 million investment by the Government into new scientific research programmes which also include vertical farming.

The trial, manufacture and delivery of novel cancer therapies will be conducted alongside a leading Chinese biotech.

The programmes involve the Malaghan Institute of Medical Research, Hunan Zhaotai Enterprise Management, Malcorp Biodiscoveries Limited and Wellington Zhaotai Therapies Limited.

The research has the potential to deliver breakthrough immunotherapy treatment that uses a patient’s own T-cells, modifying them to recognise and eradicate cancerous cells with a high degree of precision.

The proposal also focuses on the economic benefits that can be captured in New Zealand by developing a new form of cancer therapy with potential to compete on the world stage, the government said in a statement.

The other programmes to receive funding include research in farming, clean green food production and forestry.

Ms Wood said in statement that the research programmes would provide lasting economic benefits as well as making the economy more sustainable.

"These investments will help us find the answers to some of our greatest challenges – cures to deadly diseases, improving food resilience, and transitioning to a lower carbon and more productive economy."

"These projects demonstrate New Zealand’s growing strength in applying cutting edge technology to real-world problems. They will see companies and industry bodies partnering to perform ground-breaking research."

"Science and innovation are major drivers of economic growth and international competitiveness. These partnerships will see lasting benefits for New Zealand’s economy."

The breakthrough immunotherapy cancer treatment uses a patient’s own T-cells, modifying them to recognise and eradicate cancerous cells with a high degree of precision.